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H.T. Kraus, S.L. Warren, G.J. Bjorkquist, A.W. Lowder, C.M. Tchir and K.N. Walton

are generally higher ranging from 90 to 255 mg·L −1 N applied daily with a 2:1:2 N:P:K ratio ( Bailey and Nelson, undated ). Although many herbaceous perennials have the same accelerated growth rate as annual plants, they also store nutrients in roots

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Gitta Shurberg, Amy L. Shober, Christine Wiese, Geoffrey Denny, Gary W. Knox, Kimberly A. Moore and Mihai C. Giurcanu

containerized plants in a nursery or greenhouse setting ( Dubois et al., 2000 ; Hipp et al., 1988 ; Macz et al., 2001 ; Nau, 1996 ). Nau (1996) reported that rates for producing optimal growth of herbaceous perennial plants during production generally fell

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Nicholas J. Flax, Christopher J. Currey, James A. Schrader, David Grewell and William R. Graves

Floriculture sales in the United States totaled $5.87 billion in 2014 [ U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), 2015 ], of which potted herbaceous perennials [excluding hardy/garden chrysanthemums ( Chrysanthemum × morifolium )] represented $742

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Yan Chen, Regina P. Bracy, Allen D. Owings and Joey P. Quebedeaux

studies have investigated the nutrient requirements of herbaceous perennials and the possibility of grouping them by their nutrient requirements during landscape establishment ( Proctor et al., 2004 ; Strother et al., 2002 ). Nitrogen recommendations for

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Nickolee Zollinger, Richard Koenig, Teresa Cerny-Koenig and Roger Kjelgren

which irrigation water does not come in contact with leaves. A limited number of commonly grown herbaceous perennials have native distributions in saline environments and are thought to have some tolerance to salinity. For example, Leucanthemum

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Mara Grossman, John Freeborn, Holly Scoggins and Joyce Latimer

together when pulled from the plug tray ( Dole and Hamrick, 2006 ). The objective of this study is to evaluate the effects of the application of BA to herbaceous perennial plants during liner production, specifically during Stage 3, on root growth and shoot

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Benjamin K. Hoover

; Free et al., 2010 ; Graber et al., 2010 ; Van Zwieten et al., 2010 ; Vaughn et al., 2013 ), root length ( Free et al., 2010 ; Solaiman et al., 2012 ), or leaf area ( Graber at al., 2010 ; Paneque et al., 2016 ). Herbaceous perennial seedling dry

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Margaret G. Aiken, Holly L. Scoggins and Joyce G. Latimer

://www.glplants.com/plants/3792-Verbena-bonariensis-Lollipop > Grossman, M. Freeborn, J. Scoggins, H. Latimer, J. 2011 Branching agents improve quality of herbaceous perennial liners. OFA Bulletin No. 930. p. 4–7. Nov./Dec. 2011 Haver, D.L. Schuch, U.K. 2001 Influence of root

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Mara Grossman, John Freeborn, Holly Scoggins and Joyce Latimer

To produce uniform plants, growers of herbaceous perennials control plant growth by using both cultural controls, including plant nutrition, light, and temperature, and chemical controls, i.e., PGRs ( Albrecht and Tayama, 1992 ; Whipker et al

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Raul I. Cabrera, L. Rahman, Genhua Niu, Cynthia McKenney and Wayne Mackay

In this preliminary study, we evaluated the salinity tolerance of selected herbaceous perennials. Liners of Rudbeckia hirta `Becky Orange', Phlox paniculata `John Fanick', Coreopsis grandiflora `Early Sunrise', Lantana ×hybrida `New Gold' and Cuphea hyssopifolia `Allyson' were transplanted to 4-gal plastic containers filled with peat moss: pine bark: sand (3:1:1) medium amended with dolomite, Micromax and Osmocote 18-6-12 (at 2, 0.6, and 6 kg·m3, respectively). The plants were irrigated for 14 weeks with tap water containing 0, 1.5, 3, 6, 12, and 24 mM of NaCl: CaCl2 salt mixture (2:1 molar ratio). Increasing salt stress had differential effects on plant growth and quality, with Rudbeckia and Phlox being the most adversely affected even by the lowest salt treatment of 1.5 mM, with dry weight reductions of ∼25% compared to the controls. Conversely, Lantana and Cuphea tolerated extremely well salinity up to 12 mM, where dry weight reductions were less than 10% of the nonsalinized controls. The Lantana and Cuphea plants also presented the lowest leaf Cl accumulation with increasing salinity, whereas Coreopsis showed the highest Cl accumulations at any salinity level. Plots of leaf Cl concentration against dry weights showed steeply declining relationships for Rudbeckia and Phlox plants, confirming our observations and assessment that these species are to be considered salt-sensitive. Leaf Na accumulation is currently being analyzed.