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Mark E. Uchanski, Kulbhushan Grover, Dawn VanLeeuwen, and Ryan Goss

–plant science majors alike. We add to this educational research by including students’ assessment of group work and their own participation in the activity. An agricultural science research project was designed to assess the impacts of hoop house glazing on

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Elsa Sánchez and Richard Craig

A variety of cooperative activities are part of the plant systematics course at The Pennsylvania State University: a learning fair hosted by the students enrolled in the course for elementary school students, applied laboratory examinations, and applied laboratory exercises. Each activity was constructed to engage students in the learning process as well as to aid in developing useful skills for future employment. A survey administered to students enrolled in the course from 2003 to 2005 revealed that most students “strongly agreed” or “agreed” that they liked working in cooperative groups and learned from other group members. Student participation in the lecture portion of the course increased as cooperative activities were completed. Organization and planning were vital to using these activities, as were small groups and adequate incentives for completing activities.

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Elsa Sanchez and Richard Craig

The Plant Systematics course at Penn State University was reformatted in 1995 based on a three-dimensional model. It now includes several collaborative learning activities: a learning fair hosted by the enrolled students for elementary school students; applied laboratory exercises; and applied laboratory examinations. Each activity has a specific objective and was constructed to strengthen teaching effectiveness and to aid students in developing useful skills for future employment. A survey was administered to students enrolled in the course from 2003 through 2005 in part to assess the collaborative learning activities. Most students “strongly agreed” or “agreed” that they liked working in collaborative groups and learned from other group members. Students preferred working in groups for laboratory examinations more than for the Asteraceae Fair and learned more from their peers while completing the laboratory exercises than in laboratory examinations. Student participation in the lecture portion of the course increased as collaborative learning activities were completed. Camaraderie with peers through group work may have created an atmosphere conducive to participation and/or involvement during lectures. Organization and planning were vital to the success of these activities, as were using small groups and providing adequate incentives for completing activities. These activities engaged students to become active participants in the teaching and learning process.

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response to the performed techniques. Real-world Group Work Improves Student Learning Experience A hands-on hoop house construction project was successfully integrated into an undergraduate, general education, plant science course at New Mexico State

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Lauren C. Garner

-solving skills ( Brooks and Schramm, 2007 ; Eyler and Giles, 1999 ; Pinzon-Perez and Perez, 2005 ), communication skills ( Kalivas, 2008 ; Pinzon-Perez and Perez, 2005 ), group-work skills ( Brooks and Schramm, 2007 ; Pinzon-Perez and Perez, 2005 ), and

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Catherine C. Lavis and Laura A. Brannon

and reflect upon the task at hand ( Hansen, 2006 ; McCormick and Whittington, 2000 ). A common complaint about group work is freeloading ( Lou et al., 1996 ); for that reason, the crews are given guidelines to encourage accountability. Additionally

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Elizabeth T. Barton, Emily A. Barton, Susan Barton, Cheryl R. Boyer, Jim Brosnan, Paul Hill, Jared Hoyle, Judson Reid, Jamie Seger, and Eric Stafne

informal communication at work, p. 243–252. (Proc. Assn. Computing Machinery Intl. Conf. Supporting Group Work). doi: 10.1145/1531674.1531710

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Sin-Ae Park, A-Young Lee, Ki-Cheol Son, Wang-Lok Lee, and Dae-Sik Kim

group work with confused elderly people: A development of sensory integration therapy Brit. J. Occup. Ther. 54 187 192 Buford, T.W. Anton, S.D. Judge, A.R. Marzetti, E. Wohlgemuth, S.E. Carter, C.S. Leeuwenburgh, C. Pahor, M. Manini, T.M. 2010 Models of