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Lyn A. Gettys and Kimberly A. Moore

use traditional greenhouse production techniques to grow littoral aquatic plant species to meet market needs for these plants without costly infrastructure upgrades. With the exception of visual quality of blue-eyed grass, overhead irrigation did not

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Dewayne L. Ingram, Charles R. Hall and Joshua Knight

objective in this study was to add to the knowledge about the range of nursery and greenhouse production systems, by analyzing the environmental impact potentials of a model production system in the northeastern region of the United States for finished

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Yanjun Guo, Terri Starman and Charles Hall

ranked number one for total amount of potted plants sold (32 million pots) ( USDA, 2016 ). The greenhouse production process of poinsettias could have an influence on its economic value, especially when the poinsettia production margin is low due to

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Lynn Brandenberger, Todd Cavins, Mark Payton, Lynda Wells and Tina Johnson

trials in the greenhouse; Joshi et al. (1992) evaluated six cultivars and found differences in yield and leaf area. The objective of this work was to determine the suitability of spinach cultivars for greenhouse production in Oklahoma. Production

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Andrea R. Garfinkel and Karen L. Panter

greenhouse production system that can be easily integrated into the current capabilities of the majority of Wyoming greenhouses, many of which are not currently producing cut flowers and may not have access to cut flower benches or lighting capabilities

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K.C. Ting

Availability and capability of labor have become dominating factors affecting agriculture's productivity and sustainability. Agricultural mechanization can substitute for human and animal physical power and improve operational uniformity. Automation complements mechanization by implementing the capabilities of automatic perception, reasoning, communication, and task planning. Fixed automation is traditionally cost-effective for mass production of standard items. In addition, flexible automation responds to make-to-order batch processing. The appropriateness of each automation type depends on the situation at hand. Because of their vast memory and high calculation speed, computers are highly effective for rapid information processing. Incorporating state-of-the-art hardware and software, computers can generate status reports, provide decision support, gather sensor signals, and/or instruct machines to perform physical work. It is no surprise, therefore, that computerization is essential to the evolutionary process, from mechanization through fixed automation to flexible automation. Fundamentals of agricultural mechanization, automation, and computerization applied to greenhouse production are discussed. Recent research activities conducted at Rutgers Univ. are presented for illustrative purposes.

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Yanjun Guo, Terri Starman and Charles Hall

water, but could also reduce the greenhouse production time and costs by reducing water-related energy, labor, fertilizer, pesticides, growth regulators, and overhead costs, thus increasing sustainability ( Lichtenberg et al., 2013 ). Also, studies show

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Kimberly Moore, Scott Greenhut and Wagner Vendrame

technology gaps and generate data to clarify jatropha cultivation and production practices. Our objective was to examine greenhouse production by investigating the use of different growing substrates, fertilizers, and irrigation frequencies to produce

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Andrea Crowell and Steven E. Newman

The cut-flower industry is continually searching for unique products to introduce to the floral industry. Our objective was to select potential species for trial as new greenhouse-grown alternative cut flowers. Hardy perennials from the Rock/Alpine Garden at the Denver Botanical Garden served as the selection pool. Plants in this collection were fitting due to their durability in Colorado conditions and their rugged unique beauty. Several trial cuts of potential species were taken, and the flowers were evaluated for flower size, stem length, stem strength, foliage, vase life, usefulness, and general aesthetic quality. Next, an informal survey of growers, retailers, researchers, and consumers was taken to determine which flowers had already been seen on the market and which flowers would be potentially successful in the trade. After assimilating the information, the following six species were selected for trial future greenhouse production: Anthyllis vulneraria, Dianthus giganteus, Diascia integerrima, Echium lusitanium, Heuchera sanguinea `Bressingham Hybrids', and Trollius yunnanensis.

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Christopher J. Currey and Roberto G. Lopez

confidence in their greenhouse plant production skills. Methodology The TCM activities were integrated into two different courses with greenhouse production emphases and experiences, one at PU (West Lafayette, IN) in 2011 and 2013 and one at ISU (Ames, IA) in