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Kim E. Hummer, Joseph D. Postman, John Carter, and Stuart C. Gordon

During Dec. 1997 and Jan. 1998, the gooseberry mite, Cecidophyopsis grossulariae Collinge, was observed to infest 48 currant and gooseberry (Ribes L.) cultivars in a field plantation in Corvallis, Ore. The mite was observed on 29 black currant, (Ribes nigrum L.), two red currant [Ribes rubrum L. and R. sativum (Rchbch.) Syme], 12 gooseberry [R. uvacrispa L., R. oxyacanthoides var. setosum (Lindley) Sinnot], and three R. ×nidigrolaria Bauer cultivars and the hybrid R. nigrum × R. pauciflorum Turcz. ex Pojark. A range of mite infestation levels was observed, with some cultivars not being infested, some with light infestation, having 1 to 100 adult mites per bud, and some heavily infested, with more than 100 mites per bud. On lightly infested buds, the mites were inside bud and leaf scales; in heavily infested buds, mites were also observed on floral primordia. Scales of infested buds were often loose and appeared more open than noninfested ones. Mite distribution varied by branch within a plant. Black currant cultivars with the heaviest infestation of C. grossulariae were of Scandinavian, Russian, Scottish, and Canadian origin. The Russian black currant cultivar Tunnaja was the most heavily infested with more than 1000 mites per bud. Floral primordia were damaged in heavily infested buds.

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Stanisław Pluta, Edward Żurawicz, Marcin Studnicki, and Wiesław Mądry

In Poland, gooseberry is an important small fruit crop. Plants are grown on commercial plantations as well as in home gardens. In addition, this crop is a good supplement to the cultivation of blackcurrant ( Ribes nigrum ) and redcurrant ( Ribes

Open access

Cristhian Camilo Chávez-Arias, Sandra Gómez-Caro, and Hermann Restrepo-Díaz

Cape gooseberry ( P. peruviana L.) is an herbaceous plant from the South American Andes that belongs to the Solanaceae family. P. peruviana is the second exported fruit species in Colombia with an export value of US$27.8 million during 2017

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José Luis Chaves-Gómez, Alba Marina Cotes-Prado, Sandra Gómez-Caro, and Hermann Restrepo-Díaz

Cape gooseberry ( Physalis peruviana L.) is a fruit bush native to the highlands of the Andean region of South America ( Fischer et al., 2007 ). In Colombia, this crop is considered promising for export because of the high demand in European

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Deric D. Picton and Kim E. Hummer

Powdery mildew (Sphaerotheca mors-uvae) severely infects young leaves and stems of gooseberry (Ribes uva-crispa) throughout the world. Environmentally friendly control measures are being sought as alternatives to sulfur or demethylation inhibiting fungicides. This study examined the effect of a mineral oil spray, the biological control agent Trichoderma harzianum Rifai strain T-22 (Trichoderma), a combination mineral oil + Tricoderma, and the chemical fungicide thiophanate, on powdery mildew severity in `Industry,' a susceptible gooseberry. Mineral oil at 8 mL·L-1 (1.0 fl oz/gal), Tricoderma at 4 g·L-1 (0.5 oz/gal) and thiophanate at 1.45 mL·L-1 (0.186 fl oz/gal), and mineral oil + Tricoderma mix was applied to plants until runoff at 2-week intervals from February 2002 through April 2002, on potted `Industry' plants growing in a greenhouse in U. S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, National Clonal Germplasm Repository (NCGR), Corvallis, Ore. The percent of infected leaves per plant were calculated and the percent of infected stem surface areas were visually rated in mid-April. The fungicide, mineral oil, and mineral oil + Tricoderma treatment applications significantly reduced powdery mildew severity inboth leaves and stems as compared with those of the unsprayed plants. The stem powdery mildew reduction levels of the mineral oil or a combination of mineral oil + Trichoderma treatments, were not statistically different than that of thiophanate, which is reported as commercially acceptable. We recommend mineral oil spray, or mineral oil + Tricoderma, as alternatives to fungicide control of powdery mildew on leaves and stems of young gooseberry plants.

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Tanjeet Singh Chahal*

A fertilizer trial was conducted to study the effect of Nitrogen (N), Phosphorus (P), and Potassium (K) on vegetative growth and fruit quality characters in cape gooseberry. The experiment consisting of three levels each of N, P, and K (at 5, 10, and 15 g/plant) along with their interactions was conducted in the experimental area, Dept. of Horticulture, Khalsa College, Amritsar, Punjab during the year 2001-2002. The increasing level of N, P, and K help to increase the plant height, where as application of N and K at 10 g/plant and P at 15 g/plant proved their worth for maximizing fruit size. The total soluble solids level of fruits increased significantly with the increment of N level, whereas in case of P and K the total soluble solids increased upto the moderate level and decreased with the further increment. On the other hand, the acidity per cent followed an increase with the each increasing level of all the fertilizers.

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John Carter and Kim E. Hummer

Black currant (Ribes nigrum L.) cultivars with heavy, light, and no gooseberry mite (Cecidophyopsis grossulariae Collinge) infestation levels (MIL) were tested for cold hardiness by visually determining the bud injury rating (BIR) after laboratory freezing in Jan. 1998. Lightly mite-infested cvs. Blackdown and Risager, usually thought of as less cold hardy than Nordic cultivars, survived -35 °C, while mite-infested buds of the Finnish cv. Brödtorp were injured at -35 °C. Heavily mite-infested buds of the Swedish R. nigrum L. cv. StorKlas from Corvallis, Ore., were injured at -20 °C while lightly infested buds were injured to -25 °C. Noninfested `StorKlas' buds from Pennsylvania and British Columbia survived laboratory freezing to -35 °C. Heavy mite infestation lowered the bud cold hardiness of `Brödtorp' and `StorKlas' by 10 °C, as estimated by a modified Spearman-Karber T50, relative to the hardiness of lightly mite-infested buds of these cultivars. Heavily mite-infested buds contained unusual tissues forming what appeared to be spherical blisters or eruptions, ≈100 μ in diameter. Other tissues in the region of heavy mite infestation appeared to be more turgid than their noninfested counterparts. Abiotic and biotic stresses can have a combined impact on field-grown black currants.

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Danny L. Barney

During the 1800s and early 1900s, red and white currants (Ribes L. subgenus Ribes), black currants (Ribes subgenus Coreosma), and gooseberries (Ribes subgenus Grossularia) were grown commercially in the United States. Because Ribes serve as alternative hosts of white pine blister rust (Cronartium ribicola J. C. Fischer) (WPBR), which was introduced from Europe, the federal government and many states either banned or severely restricted currant and gooseberry production beginning about 1933. The development of WPBR resistant pines and black currants (the most susceptible cultivated Ribes) renewed interest in commercial Ribes production. Climatic and soil conditions in selected areas of the U.S. inland northwest and intermountain west (INIW) are favorable for commercial currant and gooseberry production. Challenges to the establishment of a Ribes industry are labor, marketing, diseases, and pests. Careful site and cultivar selection are critical for successful commercial production. This article describes Ribes opportunities and risks associated with currant and gooseberry production in the INIW. The region includes Idaho and surrounding areas in Montana, Nevada, Oregon, Utah, Washington, and Wyoming.

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Steven McKay

Recent interest in expanding commercial currant and gooseberry (Ribes L.) plantings in the United States has put pressure on the states with Ribes restrictions to review their regulations. A meeting on 9 January 1998 initiated discussion between the state agriculture regulatory agencies, forest pathologists, and horticulturists. Since then a white pine blister rust (WPBR), Cronartium ribicola J.C. Fischer) World Wide Web (Web) site (McKay, 1998) and list serve have been activated to facilitate communication. Vermont is a state that has no regulations on the books at this time. Connecticut and New York also have mentioned that infection rates are low. Maine retains a Ribes reduction program, and Massachusetts is strictly enforcing their regulations. The following summarizes the general consensus among the majority of regulating states: 1) It is desirable to find a way for both white pines (Pinus L.) and commercial Ribes plantings to coexist. 2) More research is needed to survey existing Ribes and pines, the potential impact of commercial plantings versus the impact of existing Ribes, and the potential impact of escape /volunteer seedlings from immune Ribes cultivars. 3) There is interest in permitting immune Ribes cultivars to be planted. 4) There is interest in having consistency in regulations from state to state.

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Ed Mashburn

In North America for many years the commonly held solution to white pine blister rust (Cronartium ribicola J.C. Fischer) (WPBR) was to eradicate all currants and gooseberries (Ribes L.). That approach was tried to no avail. Can currants and gooseberries be successfully grown in North America? You bet they can! Vast areas of the United States and Canada are ideal for Ribes production. Black currants (Ribes nigrum L.) are a processed fruit and production may compare to that of grain. Many of the areas that presently grow other berries could easily grow Ribes. The main barriers for production in North America are state restrictions and the availability of up-to-date information and data for growers, processors, legislators and the consuming public. I suggest that this conference and the people herein form that task group and initiate the cooperative dialogue and set forth a process to approach the WPBR problem in a holistic manner.