Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 35 items for :

  • "glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase" x
  • All content x
Clear All
Free access

Shiow Y. Wang, Hong J. Jiao, and Miklos Faust

The activity of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH), 6-phosphate gluconate dehydrogenase (6PGDH), isocitrate dehydrogenase (ICDH), pyruvate kinase (PK), and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) were studied in apple (Malus domestics Borkh.) buds during dormancy and thidiazuron-induced budbreak. When buds were dormant, the activity of the glycolytic enzymes GAPDH and PK and the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle enzyme ICDH was low compared to that in nondormant buds. The activity of these enzymes increased during budbreak, peaked when buds were in the green tip stage just before the start of rapid expansion (at 8 days after thidiazuron treatment), and declined thereafter. The activity of pentose-phosphate cycle enzymes G6PDH and 6PGDH was higher in dormant buds than in nondormant buds. 6PGDH was about twice as high as G6PDH. During budbreak and resumption of growth, G6PDH and 6PGDH activity decreased.

Full access

Jianming Sun, Yiming Liu, Xianglin Li, and Bingru Huang

Comparative proteomic analysis of drought tolerance in the two contrasting Tibetan wild genotypes and cultivated genotype BMC Genomics 16 432 Yang, Y. Kwon, H.B. Peng, H.P. Shih, M.C. 1993 Stress responses and metabolic regulation of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate

Full access

Zongchang Xu, Meng Wang, Jinhui Zhou, Han Liu, Chengsheng Zhang, and Yiqiang Li

by 3% agarose gel electrophoresis. AvACTIN = sword-leaf dogbane actin gene; AvbTUB = sword-leaf dogbane beta tubulin gene; AvEF1α = sword-leaf dogbane elongation factor 1-alpha gene; AvGAPDH = sword-leaf dogbane glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate

Free access

Jose X. Chaparro, Ronald R. Sederoff, and Dennis J. Werner

Total cellular DNA has been extracted from leaves and\or seed of Prunus dulcis, P. persica, P. mira, P. davidiana, P. persica subsp. ferganensis, and P. triloba. Chloroplast restriction fragments have been visualized by Southern blot analysis using heterologous probes from a petunia chloroplast library. Analysis of preliminary data separates the species into three groups. The first contains P. dulcis, P. mira, and P. davidiana; the second P. kansuensis, P. persica, and P. persica subsp. ferganensis; and the third P. triloba.

PCR amplification using oligos for cytosolic glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase yields genomic fragments approximately 1kb in size from P. dulcis and P. triloba. Sequence analysis will be performed to determine species relationships at the gene level.

Free access

Brandon R. Smith*, Li-Song Chen, and Lailiang Cheng

Own-rooted one-year-old `Concord' grapevines were fertigated twice weekly for 11 weeks with 1, 10, 20, 50, OR 100 μmol iron (Fe) from ferric ethylenediamine di (o-hydroxyphenylacetic) acid in a complete nutrient solution. As Fe supply increased, leaf total Fe content did not change, whereas active Fe (extracted by 2, 2'-dipyridyl) and total chlorophyll content increased curvilinearly. CO2 assimilation and stomatal conductance increased curvilinearly with increasing active Fe, whereas intercellular CO2 concentrations decreased linearly. Activities of key Calvin cycle enzymes, Rubisco, NADP-glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, phosphoribulokinase, stromal fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase (FBPase), and a key enzyme in sucrose synthesis, cytosolic FBPase, all increased linearly with increasing active Fe. No difference was found in the activities of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase and sucrose phosphate synthase of leaves between the lowest and the highest treatments, whereas slightly lower activities were observed in the middle Fe treatments. Content of 3-phosphoglycerate increased curvilinearly with increased active Fe, whereas glucose-6-phosphate and fructose-6-phosphate did not change. Glucose, fructose, sucrose, starch, and total non-structural carbohydrates at both dusk and pre-dawn increased with increasing active Fe. Carbon export from starch breakdown during the night, calculated as the difference between dusk and predawn levels, increased as active Fe increased. In conclusion, Fe limitation reduces the activities of Rubisco and other photosynthetic enzymes, and hence CO2 assimilation capacity. Fe-deficient grapevines have lower concentrations of non-structural carbohydrates in source leaves, and therefore, are source limited.

Free access

Li-Song Chen and Lailiang Cheng*

To determine the cause of zonal chlorosis of `Honeycrisp' apple leaves, we compared CO2 assimilation, carbohydrate metabolism, xanthophyll cycle and the antioxidant system between chlorotic leaves and normal leaves. Chlorotic leaves accumulated higher levels of non-structural carbohydrates, particularly starch, sorbitol, sucrose, and fructose at both dusk and predawn, and no difference was found in total non-structural carbohydrates between predawn and dusk. CO2 assimilation and the key enzymes in the Calvin cycle, ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase, NADP-glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, phosphoribulokinase, stromal fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase, and enzymes in starch and sorbitol synthesis, ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase, cytosolic fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase, and aldose 6-phosphate reductase were significantly lower in chlorotic leaves than in normal leaves. However, sucrose phosphate synthase activity was higher in chlorotic leaves. Thermal dissipation of excitation energy was enhanced in chlorotic leaves under full sun, lowering the efficiency of excitation energy transfer to PSII reaction centers. This was accompanied by a corresponding increase in both xanthophyll cycle pool size (on a chlorophyll basis) and conversion of violaxanthin to antheraxanthin and zeaxanthin. The antioxidant system was up-regulated in chlorotic leaves in response to the increased generation of reactive oxygen species. These findings support the hypothesis that phloem loading and/or transport is partially or completely blocked in chlorotic leaves, and that excessive accumulation of non-structural carbohydrates may cause feedback suppression of CO2 assimilation via direct interference with chloroplast function and/or indirect repression of photosynthetic enzymes.

Free access

M.I. van Heemstra, L.P. Bruederle, and N. Vorsa

Diploid populations and progenies of controlled crosses of blueberry, Vaccinium section Cyanococcus, were analyzed by starch gel electrophoresis for nine enzyme systems, aconitase (ACO), aldolase (ALD), alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH), glyceraldehyde-3 -phosphate dehydrogenase (G-3-PDH), isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH), leucine aminopeptidase (LAP), malate dehydrogenase (MDH), 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (6-PGD), and phosphoglucose isomerase (PGI). Allozyme variants indicated the existence of three alleles at Ace-1, Ald, G-3-pdh-2, and Mdh-2; four alleles at Mdh-3 and 6-Pgd-2; five alleles at Aco-2, Idh, Lap-1, and 6-Pgd-1; six alleles at Adh-2 and Pgm-2; and nine alleles at Pgi-2. In addition, a null allele was found at Lap-1. In the majority of progenies, the inheritance patterns for each of these loci were consistent with mendelian laws for single gene control. Forty-seven pairs of loci were tested for independent assortment revealing two linked pairs, Pgi-2/Lap-1 and Pgm-2/6-Pgd-2, which appeared to represent two independent linkage groups.

Free access

Li-Song Chen and Lailiang Cheng

To determine the cause of a characteristic zonal chlorosis of `Honeycrisp' apple (Malus ×domestica Borkh.) leaves, we compared CO2 assimilation, carbohydrate metabolism, the xanthophyll cycle and the antioxidant system between chlorotic leaves and normal leaves. Chlorotic leaves accumulated higher levels of nonstructural carbohydrates, particularly starch, sorbitol, sucrose, and fructose at both dusk and predawn, and no difference was found in total nonstructural carbohydrates between predawn and dusk. This indicates that carbon export was inhibited in chlorotic leaves. CO2 assimilation and the key enzymes in the Calvin cycle, ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase, NADP-glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, phosphoribulokinase, stromal fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase, and the key enzymes in starch and sorbitol synthesis, ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase, cytosolic fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase, and aldose 6-phosphate reductase were significantly lower in chlorotic leaves than in normal leaves. However, sucrose phosphate synthase activity was higher in chlorotic leaves. In response to a reduced demand for photosynthetic electron transport, thermal dissipation of excitation energy (measured as nonphotochemical quenching of chlorophyll fluorescence) was enhanced in chlorotic leaves under full sun, lowering the efficiency of excitation energy transfer to PSII reaction centers. This was accompanied by a corresponding increase in both xanthophyll cycle pool size (on a chlorophyll basis) and conversion of violaxanthin to antheraxanthin and zeaxanthin. The antioxidant system, including superoxide dismutase and ascorbate peroxidase and the ascorbate pool and glutathione pool, was up-regulated in chlorotic leaves in response to the increased generation of reactive oxygen species via photoreduction of oxygen. These findings support the hypothesis that phloem loading and/or transport is partially or completely blocked in chlorotic leaves, and that excessive accumulation of nonstructural carbohydrates may cause feedback suppression of CO2 assimilation via direct interference with chloroplast function and/or indirect repression of photosynthetic enzymes.

Free access

Li-Song Chen, Brandon R. Smith, and Lailiang Cheng

Own-rooted 1-year-old `Concord' grapevines (Vitis labruscana Bailey) were fertigated twice weekly for 11 weeks with 1, 10, 20, 50, or 100 μm iron (Fe) from ferric ethylenediamine di (o-hydroxyphenylacetic) acid (Fe-EDDHA) in a complete nutrient solution. As Fe supply increased, leaf total Fe content did not show a significant change, whereas active Fe (extracted by 2,2′-dipyridyl) content increased curvilinearly. Chlorophyll (Chl) content increased as Fe supply increased, with a greater response at the lower Fe rates. Chl a: b ratio remained relatively constant over the range of Fe supply, except for a slight increase at the lowest Fe treatment. Both CO2 assimilation and stomatal conductance increased curvilinearly with increasing leaf active Fe, whereas intercellular CO2 concentrations decreased linearly. Activities of key enzymes in the Calvin cycle, ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco), NADP-glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), phosphoribulokinase (PRK), stromal fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase (FBPase), and a key enzyme in sucrose synthesis, cytosolic FBPase, all increased linearly with increasing leaf active Fe. No significant difference was found in the activities of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (AGPase) and sucrose phosphate synthase (SPS) of leaves between the lowest and the highest Fe treatments, whereas slightly lower activities of AGPase and SPS were observed in the other three Fe treatments. Content of 3-phosphoglycerate (PGA) increased curvilinearly with increasing leaf active Fe, whereas glucose-6-phosphate (G6P), fructose-6-phosphate (F6P), and the ratio of G6P: F6P remained unchanged over the range of Fe supply. Concentrations of glucose, fructose, sucrose, starch, and total nonstructural carbohydrates (TNC) at both dusk and predawn increased with increasing leaf active Fe. Concentrations of starch and TNC at any given leaf active Fe content were higher at dusk than at predawn, but both glucose and fructose showed the opposite trend. No difference in sucrose concentration was found at dusk or predawn. The export of carbon from starch breakdown during the night, calculated as the difference between dusk and predawn measurements, increased as leaf active Fe content increased. The ratio of starch to sucrose at both dusk and predawn also increased with increasing leaf active Fe. In conclusion, Fe limitation reduces the activities of Rubisco and other photosynthetic enzymes, and hence CO2 assimilation capacity. Fe-deficient grapevines have lower concentrations of nonstructural carbohydrates in source leaves and, therefore, are source limited.

Free access

Li-Song Chen and Lailiang Cheng

One-year-old grapevines (Vitis labrusca L. `Concord') were supplied twice weekly for 5 weeks with 0, 5, 10, 15, or 20 mm nitrogen (N) in a modified Hoagland's solution to generate a wide range of leaf N status. Both light-saturated CO2 assimilation at ambient CO2 and at saturating CO2 increased curvilinearly as leaf N increased. Although stomatal conductance showed a similar response to leaf N as CO2 assimilation, calculated intercellular CO2 concentrations decreased. On a leaf area basis, activities of key enzymes in the Calvin cycle, ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco), NADP-glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), phosphoribulokinase (PRK), and key enzymes in sucrose and starch synthesis, fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase (FBPase), sucrose phosphate synthase (SPS), and ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (AGPase), increased linearly with increasing leaf N content. When expressed on a leaf N basis, activities of the Calvin cycle enzymes increased with increasing leaf N, whereas activities of FBPase, SPS, and AGPase did not show significant change. As leaf N increased, concentrations of glucose-6-phosphate (G6P), fructose-6-phosphate (F6P), and 3-phosphoglycerate (PGA) increased curvilinearly. The ratio of G6P/F6P remained unchanged over the leaf N range except for a significant drop at the lowest leaf N. Concentrations of glucose, fructose, and sucrose at dusk increased linearly with increasing leaf N, and there was no difference between predawn and dusk measurements. As leaf N increased, starch concentration increased linearly at dusk, but decreased linearly at predawn. The calculated carbon export from starch degradation during the night increased with increasing leaf N. These results showed that 1) grapes leaves accumulated less soluble carbohydrates under N-limitation; 2) the elevated starch level in low N leaves at predawn was the result of the reduced carbon export from starch degradation during the night; and 3) the reduced capacity of CO2 assimilation in low N leaves was caused by the coordinated decreases in the activities of key enzymes involved in CO2 assimilation as a result of direct N limitation, not by the indirect feedback repression of CO2 assimilation via sugar accumulation.