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Dewayne L. Ingram, Charles R. Hall and Joshua Knight

systems were calculated as $25.251 and $24.857, respectively. Table 1. Global warming potential (GWP) and variable costs of production components for System A for greenhouse production of young foliage plants in a 72-cell tray in the southern United States

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Dewayne L. Ingram, Charles R. Hall and Joshua Knight

. Fig. 1. Global warming potential (GWP) for production components and activities for an 11.4-cm wax begonia plant ( Begonia × semperflorens-cultorum ) modeled as an 8-week crop from plugs in a greenhouse range in the northeastern United States. Fig. 2

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Dewayne L. Ingram, Charles R. Hall and Joshua Knight

.7%) than of variable costs (2.8%). Table 1. Global warming potential (GWP) and variable costs of production components (labor, materials, and equipment operation costs) incurred during outdoor production of 20-cm natural-day Chrysanthemum in the north

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Dewayne L. Ingram, Charles R. Hall and Joshua Knight

costs of inputs and processes in the green industry. The carbon footprint is expressed as the global warming potential (GWP) of a product or process reflected in the emissions of greenhouse gases (GHG). GWP is calculated as the potential impact over a

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Andrew K. Koeser, Sarah T. Lovell, Aaron C. Petri, Robin G. Brumfield and J. Ryan Stewart

biocontainers had nearly identical GWP values as a petunia grown in the conventional plastic pot (also 10 cm in diameter). Fig. 5. Comparison of petunia production global warming potential (GWP) when using one of nine biocontainers or a conventional plastic

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Dewayne L. Ingram, Charles R. Hall and Joshua Knight

to each scenario are presented below. Table 1. Global warming potential (GWP) and variable costs of production components for Scenario A for Buxus microphylla var. japonica ‘Green Beauty’ to be grown and marketed in a no. 3 container on the U

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Dewayne L. Ingram, Charles R. Hall and Joshua Knight

GHG during production. Table 1. Contribution of individual production system components on global warming potential (GWP) and variable costs ($) for an evergreen shrub, such as Ilex crenata ‘Bennett’s Compacta’, in a no. 3 container grown in an east

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Dewayne L. Ingram

The nursery industry is often referred to as part of the green industry. However, research to understand how system components of the production and use of landscape plants contribute to environmental impacts such as global warming potential is

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Robin G. Brumfield, Laura B. Kenny, Alyssa J. DeVincentis, Andrew K. Koeser, Sven Verlinden, A.J. Both, Guihong Bi, Sarah T. Lovell and J. Ryan Stewart

and transportation requirements for plastic pots included in emission analysis and their corresponding direct cost per plant and 18-cell flat, and percent contribution to the flat’s direct cost and global warming potential (GWP). The results of the

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Dewayne L. Ingram and Charles R. Hall

SimaPro estimations, whereas others were higher using SimaPro. Table 1. Comparison of previously published global warming potential of the production of field-grown red maple, blue spruce, and redbud using a spreadsheet approach or using SimaPro life cycle