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Li-Chun Huang and Yen-Chun Lin

alternatives, and are thus beneficial for the facilitation of social relationships ( SAF, 2012a ). Actually, gift giving is one of the primary forces driving the growth of the global floral industry: nearly 60% of Americans have given flowers or houseplants as

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Chengyan Yue and Charles Hall

previous research on flowers either focuses on a few specific gift-giving occasions or, at most, a few types of flowers. Shoemaker and Relf (1994) studied the attitude of recently bereaved consumers toward sympathy flowers. They found that most sympathy

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Yen-Chun Lai and Li-Chun Huang

, growing seasons, or stories, flowers are also used as gifts to convey the givers’ intentions to the receivers [ Connolly, 2004 ; Seaton, 1995 ; Society of American Florists ( SAF), 2012a ]. In fact, gift giving today has become the primary reason for

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Lori J. Anderson, Bridget K. Behe and Kenneth C. Sanderson

Two surveys (one of 101 florists and one of 122 businesses) determined that florists spend little time or money recruiting commercial accounts. Poor communication among businesses and florists was a problem. Of the responding businesses, 91% were never contacted by their florists for any reason, and the methods florists did use for recruiting commercial accounts were incompatible with the means that businesses used to choose florists. Because 79% of businesses made some type of purchase from a florist during the year, florists could pursue commercial accounts as a way of increasing sales. When recruiting new accounts, florists should consider businesses' product preferences, peak gift-giving times, and purchasing preferences.

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vigorous species when grown in the same container as less aggressive, non-regulated species. Behavioral differences in prepurchase processes between purchasers of flowers for self-use or gift-use Personal use and gift-giving are the two most prevalent

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Li-Chun Huang

, spiritual uplifting) and gift giving are the two most prevalent purchase intentions in the floral market. This is exemplified in the following empirical market reports: In Japan, the gift and commercial sectors account for an impressive 80% of cut flower

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Alicia L. Rihn, Chengyan Yue, Bridget Behe and Charles Hall

shown that gift giving often symbolizes levels of trust, cooperation ( Bolle, 2001 ), attractiveness, devotion, and the intensity of social relationships ( Huang and Yu, 2000 ). In addition, gifts implicitly communicate the giver's intentions and

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Chengyan Yue and Bridget K. Behe

were more likely purchase from a BS. Caplow (1984) reported that a primary motivation of gift givers is to fortify important relationships and maintain goodwill with gift recipients. A product perceived as cheap or inexpensive might not be able to

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Tzu-Fang Yeh and Li-Chun Huang

communicating care between the dyads of the givers and recipients of flowers. Thus, this value is referred to as “showing care to others.” This is consistent with the results of a previous study in that gift giving is one of the main product behaviors that

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Alicia L. Rihn, Chengyan Yue, Charles Hall and Bridget K. Behe

-gift items because a badly chosen gift harms the relationship between the gift giver and recipient ( Roster, 2006 ). Yue et al. (2009 ) found that cut flower gifts are perceived as riskier than cut flowers purchased for personal enjoyment or as decor items