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Xuan Wu, Shuyin Liang and David H. Byrne

Criteria to determine the horticultural quality of ornamental plants include plant architecture, flower characteristics, and resistance to biotic and abiotic stresses. The architecture of a rose (Rosa sp.) bush is linked to flower yield and ornamental value. The Texas A&M University (TAMU) Rose Breeding and Genetics program has the objective of developing garden rose cultivars that flower heavily and exhibit a compact full shape. To determine which architectural traits are key for the development of this desired shape, five rose seedlings with a desirable compact growth habit and five with an undesirable growth habit were selected from TAMU diploid rose breeding germplasm. This comparison indicated that the key traits for the selection of compact growth habit are the number of primary shoots followed by the number of secondary and tertiary shoots produced.

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Johnn Jairo Franco Hermida, Martha Cecilia Henao Toro, Miguel Guzmán and Raul I. Cabrera

micronutrients (Fe, Mn, Cu, Zn) by atomic absorption spectroscopy in DTPA (pH 7.3) extracts; and B by colorimetry in hot water extracts. Foliar analysis and flower productivity database The database included 1914 foliar analysis made between Jan. 2005 to Dec

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Shuyin Liang, Xuan Wu and David Byrne

, anthocyanin concentration), flower number (by increasing flower abscission), flower productivity (percent flower canopy cover, leaf area), the number of vegetative nodes before flowering, the time to flowering, and leaf appearance in both cut flower ( Dela et

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Uttara C. Samarakoon, David J. Woolley, Ed R. Morgan and Keith A. Funnell

predominates, GA 3 improved flower productivity qualitatively and quantitatively, in contrast to chilling, which could cause plant death. Inadequate chilling before emergence could lead to a wider spread in timing of flower harvest. GA 3 could be applied for

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Yun-Im Kang, Hyang Young Joung, Dae Hoe Goo, Youn Jung Choi, Mok Pil Choi, Hye Ryun An, Jae-Young Ko, Kang-Joon Choi, Ki Hwan Lee and Kye Wan Hong

This study investigated trends in lily (Lilium hybrids) cultivars and challenges for growing cut lily flowers using a survey of producers in the South Korean lily industry. A questionnaire requested information on various topics including the total growing area, length of farming experience, cultivars grown, factors considered when purchasing bulbs, cultivation systems, horticultural practices, disease and pest problems, and horticultural problems. The survey targeted the membership of the Korea Lily Producer Association and the number of respondents corresponded to 43% of all lily farmers in the country. Oriental-Trumpet (OT) hybrid ‘Yelloween’ and Oriental hybrids ‘Siberia’, ‘Medusa’, and ‘Sorbonne’ were mainly cultivated in South Korea. The main flower colors were yellow, white, and pink. Factors considered in choosing cultivars were the prices of bulbs and cut flowers affecting income of the farm. More than 90% of respondents used soil culture in a greenhouse to grow cut flowers. There were various horticultural practices used from planting to harvest. The main pests harming bulb and flower productivity were fungus gnat (Bradysia difformis) and bulb mite (Rhizoglyphus robini), and the most common horticultural problem was leaf scorch. Overall, the survey suggested that the stable production of lily bulb with low cost and high quality was required and practical techniques should be developed for increasing the cut lily production efficiency. In addition, the pests, diseases, and horticultural problems in the given local environmental conditions should be considered when breeding new cultivars and developing production technology.

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Raúl I. Cabrera, Alma R. Solís-Pérez and John J. Sloan

use has been based on the observation that plant performance and flower productivity in grafted plants is higher than in plants growing on their own roots ( Cabrera, 2002 ; Hanan and Grueber, 1987 ). Up until 2 decades ago, Rosa ‘Manetti’ (syn. R

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Genhua Niu, Raul I. Cabrera, Terri W. Starman and Charles R. Hall

impact on landscape performance. R. Cabrera is leading research projects on the characterization of daily and seasonal nutrient and water use and patterns by greenhouse roses, and the effect of localized root-zone water/nutritional stresses on rose flower

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Shuyin Liang, Xuan Wu and David Byrne

, but produced few flowers during the warm season. In contrast, the rose breeding lines M4-4 and J06-20-14-3 produced abundant flowers throughout the year and thus were classified as heat tolerant with respect to their flower productivity. Five to ten

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Xuan Wu, Shuyin Liang and David H. Byrne

breeding populations at first flush and later at the end of the year to understand the architectural components important in flower productivity and bush shape. The objective of this research was to evaluate the genetic variation and heritability of six

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Ossama Kodad and Rafel Socias i Company

coefficient show that the values obtained in the first evaluation year are not enough to predict the values that can be obtained in the following years, indicating the need to evaluate this character in several years to determine the real flower productivity