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Yen-Chun Lai and Li-Chun Huang

like to buy the flowers in person because they enjoy the sensory pleasure derived from their beauty and fragrance. Consumers also want the floral gifts to have good blooming quality and longevity because they hope to maximize their purchase value and

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Li-Chun Huang and Yen-Chun Lin

marketing have investigated some important factors behind floral gift purchases, such as consumers’ attitudes, purchase intention, purchase frequency, and the price they are willing to pay. For instance, a study by Scammon et al. (1982) has examined the

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Alicia L. Rihn, Chengyan Yue, Bridget Behe and Charles Hall

present study was designed to explore the use of floral gifts among Generations X and Y. This information could then be used by the floral industry to address the problem of the downward trend in floral sales (IBISWorld Inc., 2010; Silvergleit, 2004 ). To

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Bridget K. Behe and Dennis J. Wolnick

Market segmentation is an, efficient method of defining consumer groups to develop new markets. The purpose of this research was to determine the viability of market segmentation strategies based on volume and location of purchase. A sample of 401 Pennsylvania floral consumers was divided into groups based on the number and the primary location of floral purchases. Two discriminant analyses were conducted to determine differences between market segments. Heavy floral consumers exhibited a higher level of floral knowledge, purchased more floral products for themselves and from nonflorist retailers, and had higher incomes than light or medium floral users. Florist customers purchased fresh flowers more frequently, bought more floral gifts, and spent a higher amount per purchase than supermarket customers. Segmentation based on volume of purchase and primary retail location are both viable alternatives for market development strategies for floral consumers.

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Chengyan Yue and Bridget K. Behe

Competition among floral retailers has promulgated industrywide structural changes while giving consumers more choices in locations for purchase. Consumer panel data collected by the American Floral Endowment from 1992 to 2005 were used to evaluate consumers' choice of different floral retail outlets among box stores (BS), traditional freestanding floral outlets (TF), general retailer (GR), other stores (OS), and direct-to-consumer (DC) channels. Since 1992, market share and percentage of transactions decreased through TF but increased for BS. Mean expenditure per transaction in TF was higher than in BS and GR. Consumers who made floral gift purchases were more likely to patronize TF, but those who bought floral products for themselves were more likely to purchase from BS. Consumers patronizing TF or DC were more likely to buy arranged flowers rather than unarranged flowers. Consumers who purchased foliage plants and outdoor bedding or garden plants were more likely to buy them from BS. Reasons consumers who choose BS and GR cited for using those outlets included convenience and lower prices, whereas consumers who purchased from TF and DC cited delivery, reputation, and service as major drivers impacting their use. Demographic and geographic differences were also identified among consumers using the aforementioned outlets.

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Alicia L. Rihn, Chengyan Yue, Charles Hall and Bridget K. Behe

Florists, 2005b ). Behe et al. (1992) and Huang (2005) determined that having purchased a floral gift in the past positively affected consumers’ frequency of any floral purchase. However, studies have found gifts are perceived as riskier than non

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Chengyan Yue and Bridget K. Behe

about panelists, floral products, floral gift recipients, and flower colors purchased on specific calendar holidays and noncalendar occasions was recorded. Given the 13-year timeframe, large geographic area covered, and large sample size of the study, we