Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 12 items for :

  • "farmers’ perceptions" x
Clear All
Free access

Rukundo Placide, Hussein Shimelis, Mark Laing and Daphrose Gahakwa

their production packages, according to the needs of the growers in the country. Therefore, the objective of this study was to assess farmersperception, production and productivity constraints, preferences, and breeding priorities of sweetpotato in

Full access

Cesar Velasquez, Catherine Eastman and John Masiunas

Fresh-market vegetable production in the midwestern U.S. has been declining due to diminished returns received by farmers, competition from vegetables produced in other regions, older farmers retiring and not being replaced, and urban sprawl. To reverse this trend, midwestern-U.S. vegetable farmers must find ways to enhance the value of their production. One way might be the production of vegetable cultivars that have enhanced attributes desired by consumers. Our objective was to assess how Illinois farmers' current perceptions may affect acceptance and production of vegetable cultivars with enhanced health benefits. About 20% of Illinois fresh-market vegetable growers were surveyed. We found that the current media attention on genetically modified organisms (GMOs) infl uenced grower response. Farmers who were concerned about GMOs were 5 times more likely to reject growing new vegetable cultivars with enhanced health benefits even those developed with conventional breeding methods. However, farmers who were not concerned or who were undecided in their opinions concerning GMOs were 11 times more likely to adopt new cultivars. Education and research programs must be developed to supply information about vegetable cultivars with enhanced health benefits and to address farmers' concerns about GMOs.

Full access

David S. Conner and Kathleen Demchak

Strawberry (Fragaria ×ananassa) and caneberries (Rubus sp.) are popular crops that can bring revenue to farms and may improve farm profitability. High and low tunnels can bring a number of benefits to growers, including season extension and improved berry yield and quality, as well as management challenges. Few studies in the literature report directly on grower experiences using tunnels. We report the results of interviews of 10 independent growers who use tunnels to produce strawberries and caneberries. The results echo previous studies finding improved yield and quality, and highlight benefits and challenges around pest, weed, and nutrient management. One novel finding is the role of season extension in creating marketing opportunities. Interviewed growers caution of a learning curve and the need to start on a small scale and grow gradually. Future focus for research should include improved ventilation and mechanization.

Restricted access

Ariana P. Torres and Maria I. Marshall

agriculture, the perception of organic as a diversification strategy, the uncertainty to obtain organic price premiums, and if the farmer supported the philosophy of organic farming. The index variable bcerti measured farmersperceptions toward the process

Open access

, and determined concentration thresholds for phytotoxicity. Farmer Perspectives on Growing in High Tunnels Few studies have measured farmersperceptions of growing in high tunnels. Researchers Bruce et al. (p. 290) conducted interviews with 20 farmers

Open access

Analena B. Bruce, Elizabeth T. Maynard and James R. Farmer

their conclusions. There is a need for qualitative research focused on the human dimensions of high tunnel management because few studies have measured farmersperceptions of the factors that affect the outcomes and impacts of growing specialty crops in

Restricted access

Eric Hanson, Brent Crain and Joshua Moses

.P. Pritts, M. Handley, M. 2008 Raspberry and blackberry production guide for the Northeast, Midwest, and Eastern Canada. (Natural Resource Agr. Eng. Serv. NRAES-35, Ithaca, NY) Conner, D.S. Demchak, K. 2018 Farmer perceptions of tunnels for berry production

Full access

Dru N. Montri, Bridget K. Behe and Kimberly Chung

country. However, the research design purposely samples across a wide range of farmer experiences. Gaining a better understanding of farmer perceptions and preferences will help researchers and practitioners develop further research, policies, and programs

Free access

Penelope F. Measham, Audrey G. Quentin and Nicholas MacNair

Australia Inc. Apr. 2012. < http://www.cherrygrowers.org.au/ > Juana, J.S. Kahaka, Z. Okurut, F.N. 2013 Farmers' perceptions and adaptations to climate change in sub-Sahara Africa: A synthesis of empirical studies and implications for public policy in

Free access

Francisco Alcon, Mari Carmen García-Martínez, María Dolores De-Miguel and María Ángeles Fernández-Zamudio

Kington, E.A. Pannell, D.J. 2003 Dryland salinity in the Upper Kent River catchment of Western Australia: Farmer perceptions and practices Aust. J. Exp. Agr. 43 19 28 Lancaster, T. 1972 A stochastic model