Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 1,547 items for :

Clear All
Free access

Dan D. MacLean and D. Scott NeSmith

inhibiting loss of quality in numerous fruits and vegetables ( Watkins, 2006 ). A treatment of 1-MCP reduces the perception of ethylene by competitively binding to the ethylene receptors in the tissue ( Sisler et al., 1996 ; Sisler and Serek, 1997

Free access

Holly A. Little, Rebecca Grumet and James F. Hancock

possibility for pleiotropic effects that could cause ecologically relevant changes in phenotype ( Wolfenbarger and Grumet, 2002 ). In this review, we use modified ethylene production, perception, or response, collectively referred to as ethylene signaling, as

Free access

Jure Kolarič, Irena Mavrič Pleško, Stanislav Tojnko and Matej Stopar

cropping ( Greene, 2002 ). Ethylene induces (stimulates) organ abscission in numerous plants including apple ( Addicott, 1982 ; Arteca, 1995 ; Reid, 1985 ). There is evidence that apple fruitlet abscission may be related to increased ethylene evolution

Restricted access

Xia Ye, Xianbo Zheng, Dehua Zhai, Wen Song, Bin Tan, Jidong Li and Jiancan Feng

al., 2012 ; Lichter, 2016 ). Ethylene plays an important role in preharvest ripening in both climacteric and nonclimacteric fruit and is involved either directly or indirectly in the regulation of grape development and organ senescence ( Chervin et

Free access

Chikako Honda, Hideo Bessho, Mari Murai, Hiroshi Iwanami, Shigeki Moriya, Kazuyuki Abe, Masato Wada, Yuki Moriya-Tanaka, Hiroko Hayama and Miho Tatsuki

; Faragher, 1983 ; Marais et al., 2001 ). However, because the experimental conditions differed among the respective reports, comparing their results is difficult. Ethylene is a key plant hormone involved in fruit ripening in apples ( Saure, 1990 ). Whale

Free access

Teresa F. Wegrzyn and Elspeth A. MacRae

The activities of several cell wall-associated enzymes of the outer pericarp were assayed during softening of kiwifruit [Actinidia deliciosa (A. Chev.) C.F. Liang et A.R. Ferguson var. deliciosa cv. Hayward] treated with ethylene. The activity of polygalacturonase (EC 3.2.1.15) increased slightly during fruit softening, while β-galactosidase (EC 3.2.1.23) activity remained constant. Salt-extracted pectinesterase (EC 3.1.1.11) activity increased during ethylene treatment, then dropped rapidly to low levels as fruit softened. Residual pectinesterase activity, extracted after digestion of the cell wall pellet with a fungal enzyme mix, decreased on softening. The rapid softening of kiwifruit in response to ethylene treatment may be initiated by an induction of pectinesterase activity, causing increased de-esterification of cell wall pectins, followed by degradation of solubilized pectin.

Free access

Daryl C. Joyce, Michael S. Reid and Richard Y. Evans

Low concentrations of ethylene induced abscission of leaves and berries from cut branchlets of English holly (Ilex aquifolium L.) and American mistletoe [Phoradendron tomentosum (DC.) Engelm. ex Gray ssp. macrophyllum (Engelm.) Wiens]. Application of 1 μmol of Ag+ per branchlet (as the anionic silver thiosulfate complex, STS) via the transpiration stream was found to retard this abscission. A higher application rate (4 μmol Ag+ per branchlet) stimulated leaf abscission in mistletoe. There were marked differences in sensitivity to ethylene among various types of holly.

Free access

P. Perkins-Veazie, J.R. Clark, D.J. Huber and E.A. Baldwin

Fruit were harvested from an erect, thornless blackberry (Rubus L. subgenus Rubus Watson, `Navaho' to study ripening changes. Soluble solids content increased between the red (unripe) and dull-black (overripe) stages of ripening while titratable acidity decreased sharply between the mottled and shiny-black ripeness stages. Anthocyanin content increased sharply between the mottled and shiny-black stages. Firmness of drupelet and receptacle tissues decreased between the mottled and shiny-black stages of ripeness. In whole blackberries, total uronic acids decreased, and water soluble uronic acids increased between the green-red and shiny-black ripeness stages. Volatile production paralleled ripening changes, and was highest in dull-black fruit, with alcohols and aldehydes predominating. Respiration of intact fruit maintained in water decreased between the green and red ripeness stages and increased at the mottled (part-black) and black ripeness stages. Ethylene production remained below 10 nmol·kg-1·h-1 until the dull-black (overripe) stage of maturity. Free 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) and ACC oxidase did not increase in berries until the shiny-black stage, corresponding with the onset of detectable ethylene production. ACC oxidase activity decreased in the drupelet tissue (0.5 to 0.01 μmol·kg-1·h-1) and increased in the receptacle tissue (2 to 3.8 μmol·kg-1·h-1) as fruit changed from red to dull black. These results indicate that ripening in blackberries may be initiated in the receptacle tissue. Ripening in blackberries is likely independent of ethylene, but ethylene may regulate berry detachment from pedicels, thus controlling timing of fruit harvests.

Free access

Nancy Santana-Buzzy, Adriana Canto-Flick, Lourdes G. Iglesias-Andreu, María del C. Montalvo-Peniche, Guadalupe López-Puc and Felipe Barahona-Pérez

The in vitro production of ethylene and its effects on the development of Habanero pepper (Capsicum chinense Jacq.) plantlets were evaluated using nonventilated containers (NVCs) and ventilated containers (VCs). Shoots of Habanero pepper between 0.5 and 1.0 cm of height were cultivated in Magenta culture boxes and samples of the headspace atmosphere were taken every four days during the previously established culturing time of 40 days. The presence of ethylene was detected in the NVCs and produced a negative effect on the development of plantlets. In a second phase of this work, the effect of silver nitrate (AgNO3) and cobalt chloride (CoCl2) on ethylene production was evaluated during in vitro development of Habanero pepper plantlets. Concentrations of 50, 300, and 500 μm of each ethylene inhibitor were used in the culture medium. Although cobalt chloride partially inhibited the production of ethylene during in vitro culture of this species, at low concentrations the plantlets presented some degree of vitrification and the highest concentration proved to be toxic for the plantlets. Silver nitrate added to the culture medium did not inhibit ethylene production, however, it did inhibit the effect of this hormone on the plantlets. In fact, when high concentrations of silver nitrate were used (300 μm), high amounts of ethylene were detected in the headspace of the vessels and plantlets were actually healthier.

Full access

Sasivimon Chomchalow, N.M. El Assi, S.A. Sargent and J.K. Brecht

Green tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum `Sunny') fruit were stored at 2.5, 5, 7.5, 10, or 12.5 °C (36.5, 41, 45.5, 50, or 54.5 °F) for 1, 3, 5, or 7 days to determine their sensitivity to chilling injury. In subsequent experiments, fruit were treated with ethylene at 20 °C (68 °F) until the breaker stage was reached, either before or after storage at 12.5 °C for 0, 1, 3, 5, or 7 days, or 2.5 °C for 3, 5, 7, or 9 days. Number of days to reach the breaker stage was used as an indicator of initial maturity. The chilling threshold temperature for green `Sunny' tomatoes was near 7.5 °C, with delayed ripening occurring in fruit stored for ≥5 days. Longer exposure times at chilling temperatures resulted in reduced marketable life, dull color, flaccidity, and delayed, uneven (blotchy) and nonuniform ripening. Chemical composition was generally unaffected by chilling, while loss of firmness as a result of chilling exposure time rather than chilling temperatures per se was observed. Increased storage time at either 2.5 or 12.5 °C accentuated the initial differences in fruit maturity and thus resulted in less uniform ripening, especially for tomatoes stored before ethylene treatment, but the effect was much greater following 2.5 °C storage. Exposure to 2.5 °C for as little as 3 days before ethylene treatment caused blotchy ripening and decay, and reduced the marketable life of tomatoes by half compared to storage at nonchilling temperature. Treatment with ethylene before storage prevented chilling injury for up to 5 days at 2.5 °C and prolonged the marketable life of tomatoes stored at either chilling or nonchilling temperature. Tomatoes became less responsive to poststorage ethylene treatment with increased storage time at either 2.5 or 12.5 °C. More mature tomatoes and those treated with ethylene before 12.5 °C storage lost less weight. Vitamin C content was lower in more mature tomatoes, but ethylene treatment resulted in better maintenance of vitamin C by shortening the time to reach the red stage. No other significant differences in color, firmness or chemical composition at the red stage were found between fruit with different initial maturities or fruit treated with ethylene before or after 2.5 or 12.5 °C storage. Treating green tomatoes with ethylene before storage or transport is preferable to poststorage treatment because of faster and more uniform ripening, and also increased marketable life and reduced risk of injury in the event of exposure to chilling temperatures.