Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 158 items for :

  • "essential oil" x
Clear All
Free access

Victoria M. Anderson, Douglas D. Archbold, Robert L. Geneve, Dewayne L. Ingram and Krista L. Jacobsen

of calendula and other medicinal plants in a variety of contexts. Calendula grown for essential oil is often produced in semiarid and arid regions where agricultural water is limited (e.g., Khalid and Teixeira da Silva, 2010 ; Maleki et al., 2014

Free access

Kelly M. Bowes and Valtcho D. Zheljazkov

Field and laboratory experiments were conducted at two sites in Nova Scotia during 2001 and 2002 to assess the potential to grow fennel (Foeniculum vulgare Mill.) as an essential oil crop in the Maritime region of Canada. Three cultivars—`Shumen', `Berfena', and `Sweet Fennel'—and two seeding dates—24 May and 8 June—were evaluated. Essential oil yields and composition were determined and compared to commercially available fennel essential oil from the U.S. The highest herbage yields were produced by `Shumen' from the earlier seeding date. Essential oil content and yields were lowest in `Sweet Fennel' and highest in `Shumen'. The major component of the essential oil was anethole, 47% to 80.2%. Other major components of the essential oil were methyl chavicol, fenchone, α-phellandrene, α-pinene, ortho cymene, β-phellandrene, fenchyl acetate, β-pinene, and apiole. The essential oil composition was unique to each cultivar. The highest methyl chavicol content was in `Shumen', while the highest concentration of phellandrene, fenchyl acetate and apiole were detected in `Sweet Fennel' oil. Fenchone, ortho cymene, β-pinene, α-phellandrene, and α-pinene were the highest in `Berfena'. The composition of the oil was similar to the commercially purchased oil and met industry requirements of oil composition. The results suggest there is potential to grow fennel as an essential oil crop in Nova Scotia.

Free access

Linda M. Falzari, Robert C. Menary and Valerie A. Dragar

Fennel (Foeniculum vulgare Mill.) is grown commercially in Tasmania for the production of a steam-distilled essential oil, which is high in trans-anethole. Often, only the generative canopy is harvested since this contains the bulk of the oil and further this oil is higher in anethole than oil from other parts of the plant. Regardless of whether the whole crop is forage harvested or the generative canopy alone is removed using a combine-harvester, the most efficient oil production occurs when the greatest proportion of the canopy is generative, giving maximum oil yield from a minimum of fresh weight to be processed. A trial was conducted to examine the relationship between stand density and the various yield components of fennel in order to predict the likely effect on yield of increasing stem density as the short term perennial crop matures. As for most crops, planting density and biomass yield are closely related and the optimum planting density was predicted using a mathematical model. The results suggest that an initial stand density of 10 to 12 plants/m2, in a square layout, would produce the greatest yield of essential oil per unit area by maximising the production of the generative canopy. This density also maximises the yield of oil relative to the weight of material to be distilled.

Free access

Valtcho D. Zheljazkov, Tess Astatkie, Barry O'Brocki and Ekaterina Jeliazkova

Anise ( Pimpinella anisum L.) is one of the most widely used plants in the world; anise seed is used as a spice ( Leela and Vipin, 2008 ), and anise seed essential oil has a number of applications as an aromatic agent in the food and liquor

Free access

Stephen S. Miller and Thomas Tworkoski

, including sodium chloride, LS, acetic acid, and soybean oil, have been found to have potential flower-thinning application for organic apple orchards ( Moran et al., 2000 ; Stopar, 2008 ). Tworkoski (2002) reported that an essential oil was effective as a

Free access

Valtcho D. Zheljazkov, Tess Astatkie and Vicki Schlegel

Oregano ( Origanum vulgare L.) is a well-known medicinal, culinary, and essential oil plant that has been used as medicinal plant since ancient times in the Mediterranean region ( Stojanov, 1973 ). Indeed, the plant, the plant extract, and the

Free access

Valtcho D. Zheljazkov, Tess Astatkie and Vicki Schlegel

( Kalies et al., 2010 ). The essential oil of ponderosa pine also has antimicrobial properties ( Himejima et al., 1992 ; Krauze-Baranowska et al., 2002 ). Ponderosa pine essential oil has a wide internal and international market. For example, Krauze

Free access

Valtcho D. Zheljazkov and Tess Astatkie

., 2004 ; Clark, 1998 , Lawrence, 2007 ; Topalov and Zheljazkov, 1991 ; Zheljazkov et al., 1996a ). Japanese cornmint essential oil is rich in menthol and the species is currently the only commercial source for the production of natural menthol ( Clark

Free access

Valtcho D. Zheljazkov, Tess Astatkie and Ekaterina Jeliazkova

( Rumble and Gobeille, 2013 ; Scher, 2002 ). These animals play a major role in seed dispersal. Rocky Mountain juniper leaves contain a significant amount of strongly aromatic essential oil, which has been subject to some previous studies ( Adams and

Free access

Valtcho D. Zheljazkov, Tess Astatkie, Santosh Shiwakoti, Shital Poudyal, Thomas Horgan, Natasha Kovatcheva and Anna Dobreva

Garden sage ( Salvia officinalis L.) is a small herbaceous aromatic, medicinal, and culinary plant from the Lamiaceae family ( Pederson, 2000 ). Garden sage essential oil is extracted from the whole above-ground herbage and has numerous