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Gerald S. Dobbs and Diane Relf

Surveys taken in 1991 and 1992 in Virginia suggest that the enclave model of employment may be a more successful and long-term method of employing individuals with mental disabilities (IMDs) within Virginia college grounds departments. Individual, competitive placement of IMDs seems to be less successful, resulting in increased level of temporary and short-term employment. Additional research is needed to document the methods and benefits of employment used by other grounds departments, including colleges outside Virginia in the employment of IMDs.

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Brian J. Pearson and Kimberly Moore

professional skills for career success. Poor understanding of employment needs coupled with learning objectives that do not adequately address professional skill development may produce graduates that are at a competitive disadvantage when seeking industry

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Benedict Posadas

), annual employment, and workers’ earnings, skills, training, safety, and retention rates. This article is a spatially, temporally, and analytically expanded version of an earlier article which covered 87 growers located in the three northern Gulf of Mexico

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Mary Taylor Haque, Joseph P. Albano, William B. Miller, Ted Whitwell and Kristy Thomason

Student Teaching and Research Initiative through Volunteer Employment (STRIVE) is an innovative new program developed collaboratively by faculty and students to offer students work experience opportunities in the Dept. of Horticulture while assisting with horticultural needs. The program promotes volunteerism and education while strengthening participating faculty, staff, and students in areas of research, teaching, or public service. STRIVE requires a voluntary commitment of 3 h/week in an area agreed on by participants and their supervisors. Participants are formally acknowledged by the department for their contributions after completing the semester-long program. Students participating thus far have assisted in teaching laboratories, program development, and greenhouse management.

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T.M. Waliczek, P.D. O'Rourke and J.C. Bradley

Horticulture crops are a multimillion dollar industry in Illinois, providing employment opportunities as well as strengthening many local economies. In February 1998, about 300 surveys were mailed to members of the Illinois Nurserymen's Association, including owners and operation managers of retail and wholesale nurseries, greenhouses and garden centers. Questions included the pool of available labor, the total number of persons employed, including full and part-time workers, starting and average salaries for employees, retention rates and training procedures. Questions were also asked regarding employees' education and experience level, average compensation for various levels of employment and demographics of the employee pool. A 48% response rate was achieved with 147 surveys returned and analyzed. Respondents reported an average of 70 employees including sales staff, office staff and seasonal employees. Those businesses responding employed an average of 2.5 managers with an approximate annual salary of $48,000, and an average of 15 laborers with an approximate annual salary of $21,000. Correlations provided insight into which areas of the industry hired persons with horticulture degrees and the types of experience most valued by the respondents.

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T.M. Waliczek and P.D. O'Rourke

Horticulture crops are a multi-million dollar industry in Illinois, providing employment opportunities as well as strengthening many local economies. To help establish a “green-goods” industry basis for Illinois, ≈300 surveys were mailed to members of the Illinois Nurserymen's Association, including owners and operation managers of retail and wholesale nurseries, greenhouses and garden centers. The focus of the questionnaire was on the horticultural products and services provided and the value of these sales and services to residents of Illinois. Questions were included regarding the pool of available labor, the total number of industry employees, including full and part-time employees, and the starting and average salaries for employees. A 25% response rate was achieved with 76 surveys returned and analyzed. Results examined fundamental predictors in gaining industry employment such as education and experience, employee demographics and average compensation for those employed at various levels. Provided that survey responses were indicative of the overall Illinois horticulture industry, responses provided evidence that the horticulture industry contributes approximately $67 million in salary and wages to the Illinois economy. While universities are reporting an increase in the number of female horticulture graduates, respondents indicated that 74.8% of their employees were male. Businesses reported an average of 28 employees including sales and office staff. However, very few businesses had hired people with disabilities or were aware of the services the state can provide to businesses hiring people with disabilities. Businesses employed an average of 2.5 managers with an approximate annual salary of $48,000, and an average of 15 laborers with an approximate annual salary of $21,000. Correlations provided insight into which areas of the industry hired persons with horticulture degrees and the types of experience most valued by the industry.

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Alan W. Hodges, Charles R. Hall, Marco A. Palma and Hayk Khachatryan

. However, the industry has reached the mature stage of its life cycle and is now growing slowly or even declining in some segments ( Hall, 2010 ). According to the data from the Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages ( U.S. Department of Labor, 2015

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Alan W. Hodges, Charles R. Hall and Marco A. Palma

periods. However, the industry has reached the mature stage of its life cycle and has suffered as most businesses with the recession of 2008–09 ( Hall, 2010 ). Employment in the principal sectors of the U.S. green industry grew slowly or remained stable

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Alan W. Hodges and John J. Haydu

study for 2002, Florida's green industry had total employment impacts of 147,795 jobs, output impacts of $10.0 billion (B), and value-added impacts of $7.1 B ( Hall et al., 2006 ). These results represented significant increases in Florida since previous

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Joseph Krahe and Benjamin Campbell

In 2007–08, direct employment in the green industry was estimated as 1.2 million, of which almost 22% was devoted to production-related tasks ( Hodges et al., 2011 ). As noted by Posadas (2012) , laborers in the green industry “perform varied