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Rhuanito S. Ferrarezi, Stuart A. Weiss, Thomas C. Geiger, and K. Paul Beamer

flavor, texture, growth, and yield, they are very similar. For this reason, we will discuss the snow and sugar snap pea cultivars tested as simply edible-pod peas. Edible-pod peas are an alternative crop for small farmers due to the short cycle, high

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James R. Baggett and Deborah Kean

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Rebecca J. McGee and James R. Baggett

In crosses between stringless and stringy podded pea cultivars, all plants of the F1 and backcross to the stringy parent had stringy pods. F2 ratios varied widely among crosses, and populations always had more stringy plants than expected, based on a single locus. The ratio of nonsegregating (stringy): segregating F3 families derived from stringy F2 plants fit a single-gene hypothesis in half of the crosses. Backcrosses of F1 to the stringless parent fit the expected 1:1 ratio when the pollen parent was stringless, but the reciprocal backcrosses showed a deficiency of stringless plants, suggesting that poor competitive ability of pollen bearing the stringless factor was the reason for deficiencies of stringless plants. It is concluded that stringlessness is controlled by a single recessive gene for which the designation sin-2 is proposed. A reduction in pod size, plant height, and number of wrinkled seed segregates was associated with stringlessness.

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Rebecca J. McGee and James R. Baggett

There was no difference in percentage in vitro germination of pollen from stringless pea (Pisum sativum L.) cv. Sugar Daddy and stringy `Oregon Sugarpod II' (OSP) and `OSU 705' (705). However, pollen tubes of `Sugar Daddy' grew more slowly in vitro than those of OSP or 705. Differences in pollen tube growth rate were demonstrated in vivo following time-course pollinations involving reciprocal crosses of `Sugar Daddy' with OSP and 705, along with the selfed parents. After 8 hours, pollen tubes from stringless peas (“stringless” pollen) had entered 13% of the ovules compared with 51% for those from stringy peas (“stringy” pollen). Stringless pollen tubes entered 29% and stringy pollen tubes 66% of the ovules after 10 hours. The slower growth of stringless compared with stringy pollen tubes is a plausible explanation for previously observed deficiencies of stringless plants in segregating populations.

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Harbans Bhardwai and Ron Eitenmiller

Guar or cluster bean (Cyamopsis tetragonoloba (L.) Taubert), a leguminous plant, is grown in many parts of the world for consumption as green beans. However, information on green bean yield and their nutritional quality is lacking. Our objectives were to determine yield potential, optimum harvesting time, and nutritional quality of green guar beans. We planted 10 guar varieties in a RCBD with 4 replications on 1 June 1990 at Fort Valley, Georgia. The guar bean production was recorded at 55, 70, 85, and 100 days after planting (DAP). Significant variation for bean yield existed among genotypes. The bean yield (kg ha-1) varied from 9549 (Kinman) to 1629 (HG-75), at 85 DAP. The highest yield at 100 DAP was recorded for Lewis. The ideal harvesting time, based on degree of yellowness and bean texture, for Durga Jay, Esser, Hall, SPS-119, and Lewis seemed to be 100-115 DAP whereas the beans of Brooks, HG-75, HSB-130, Kinman, and Santa Cruz became tougher and yellow by 100 DAP. A comparison with published results of snap beans and edible-pod peas indicated that green guar beans contained greater amounts of protein, total carbohydrates, vitamin C, calcium, iron, manganese, phosphorus, potassium, and sodium. These results indicate that green guar beans can be a potential alternate source of income for farmers in Georgia and other states.

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Antonio M. De Ron, Jorge J. Magallanes, Óscar Martínez, Paula Rodiño, and Marta Santalla

We evaluated 33 edible-pod pea (Pisum sativum L.) lines selected from single plants within 11 snow pea landraces and three elite cultivars for their horticultural value in three field trials at Pontevedra and Lugo (northwestern Spain). Field performance was estimated according to six traits related to earliness and duration, while horticultural value was determined by five pod traits. The global pod quality was estimated by a taste panel. Lines showed significant differences in nine quantitative traits. Significant differences were found among means of five landraces and the lines selected within them for pod length, width and weight. Cluster and principal component analysis identified a main group of 16 lines derived mainly from landraces PSM-0112 and PSM-0227 that had desirable earliness and pod quality. Some of the lines, such as MB-0298, MB-0324, MB-0325, MB-0326, MB-0332, and MB-0334 are appropriate for vegetable production as edible pod snow pea varieties and for use in breeding programs. Moreover, the lines MB-0298, MB-0321, MB-0322, and MB-0324 showed stable earliness and MB-0330 and MB-0332 stable pod quality across the three environments evaluated.

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the highly preferred online format. Edible-pod Peas as High-value Crops in the U.S. Virgin Islands Snow pea and sugar snap pea are high-value crops typically grown in temperate regions. Temperature is the main factor limiting the production of edible-pod

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Rhuanito Soranz Ferrarezi, Thomas C. Geiger, Jayar Greenidge, Shamali Dennery, Stuart A. Weiss, and Gustavo H.S. Vieira

.A. Geiger, T.C. Beamer, K.P. 2016 Edible-pod peas as high-value crops in the U.S. Virgin Islands HortTechnology 26 683 689 Firoz, Z. 2009 Impact of nitrogen and phosphorus on the growth and yield of okra ( Abelmoschus esculentus L. Moench) in hill slope