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Wei-Ting Tsai and Chien-Young Chu

Phalaenopsis and Doritaenopsis , hybrids between Phalaenopsis and Doritis , are collectively referred to as Phalaenopsis , the major floral crop in Taiwan for exporting. Asymbiotic culture on an agar-solidified medium is the main method

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Pablo Bolaños-Villegas, Shih-Wen Chin, and Fure-Chyi Chen

features, including chromosome number, chromosome pairing behavior, frequency of normal tetrads, and pollen viability, of several Doritaenopsis and Phalaenopsis hybrids and to relate that information to capsule set and overall crossing ability. Such

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Linsey A. Newton and Erik S. Runkle

sold in the United States ( USDA, 2008a ). An estimated 75% or more of orchids sold are potted flowering Phalaenopsis , Doritaenopsis , and their related hybrids (subsequently referred to only as Phalaenopsis ; Griesbach, 2002 ). Phalaenopsis has

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Wagner A. Vendrame, Ian Maguire, and Virginia S. Carvalho

). Doritaenopsis Guillaum. & Lami is a popular hybrid between Phalaenopsis Blume and Doritis pulcherrima Lindl. and is used as a potted plant or cut flower ( Tsukazaki et al., 2000 ). General micropropagation procedures for Doritaenopsis and Phalaenopsis

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Po-Hung Wu and Doris C.N. Chang

percentage and flower count. Plants of two commercial phalaenopsis cultivars were selected, including phalaenopsis Luchia Pink ‘244’ and doritaenopsis Taisico Firebird ‘OX’. Mature plants (six leaves and the leaf spread was 25–30 cm) used in this experiment

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Yong Ha Rhie, Seonghwan Kang, and Jongyun Kim

al., 2011 ). The objective of the present study was to compare the flowering of Doritaenopsis Queen Beer ‘Mantefon’, potted with sphagnum moss and maintained at various substrate moisture levels, using soil moisture sensor-based automated irrigation

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Yin-Tung Wang*

It not clear how a prolonged period of cool days and warm nights affect Phalaenopsis hybrids which take up CO2 mainly at night. The `Lava Glow' clone of the hybrid Doritaenopsis (Phal. Buddha's Treasure × Doritis pulcherrima) 15 cm in leaf span were subjected to day/night (12 h each daily) temperatures of 30/25, 25/30, 25/20, or 20/25 °C at 170 umol.m-2 .s-1 PPF. After nine months, plants under the higher average daily temperature (ADT) produced more leaves. Those grown at 30/25 °C had the largest leaf span and total length of the new leaves. Plants under 30/25, 25/30, 25/20, or 20/25 °C had 5.0, 4.7, 3.6, and 2.8 new leaves and 72, 61, 42, and 28 cm in total new leaf length, respectively. Cool days and warm nights resulted in smaller leaf span and reduced leaf growth, particularly at 20/25 than at 25/30 °C. Within a given ADT, cooler days resulted in shorter leaves. Leaves produced by plants at the lower ADT had a smaller length to width ratio and the more desirable oval shape. The most striking effect of 20/25 °C was that 14 out of 15 plants bloomed, whereas only 5 plants under 25/20 °C and none in the 30/25 or 25/30 °C treatment flowered. In a second experiment, 18-22 cm plants were subjected to 30/20, 20/30, 25/15, or 15/25 °C. After 29 weeks, similar results were obtained. All plants under 15/25 °C bloomed, whereas none in the other treatments produced flowers. Long-term exposure to 15/25 °C resulted in slow leaf production and undesirable small leaves. These results suggest that, with day temperatures in the 20-15 °C range, nights 10-5 °C warmer are not desirable for rapid vegetative growth. However, cool days and warm nights may be used to effectively induce the flowering process.

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Linsey A. Newton and Erik S. Runkle

clones known to have tall inflorescences were obtained for experimentation: Miss Saigon ( Doritaenopsis Orglade's Puff × Phalaenopsis Naseweis), ‘Smart Thing’ (parentage unknown), and Andrew ( Phalaenopsis Ken Ciula × Doritaenopsis Orglade's Geos

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Yin-Tung Wang

Phalaenopsis and Doritaenopsis (intergeneric hybrids between Phalaenopsis species and Doritis pulcherrima Lindley and between their hybrids or species) require a relatively warm environment to grow quickly ( Krizek and Lawson, 1974 ; Lee, 1991 ; Lee

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Yin-Tung Wang

Since Phalaenopsis orchids are CAM plants, learning how they respond to night temperature warmer than the day would help regulate their production. On 1 Apr. 2003, P. amabilis plants were subjected to day/night temperatures at 30/25, 25/30, 25/20, 20/25, 20/15, or 15/20 °C under 140 μmol·m-2·s-1 PPF. After 4 months, the total length of new leaves was shorter as a result of fewer and shorter new leaves when nights were cooler than the days and as the average daily temperature declined. More spikes were produced at 25/20 and 20/25 °C than at 20/15 or 15/20 °C. In another experiment, P. amabilis plants were moved to the above conditions on 12 Aug. Plants exposed to 30/25 or 25/30 °C had more leaf growth than at lower temperatures, but no flowering. Plants that were exposed to 25/20 or 20/25 °C spiked in 2 weeks; but plants took 20 and 18 d to spike under 20/15 or 15/20 °C, respectively. Again, as average daily temperature decreased, there was less leaf growth. Cooler day than the night reduced vegetative growth, regardless of temperature. Plants at 25/20 or 20/25 °C had higher flower count (12) than those at 20/15 or 15/20 °C (8). In a third experiment, plants of a large-flowered Doritaenopsis hybrid spiked at 22–24 d when exposed to 25/20 or 20/25 °C, whereas 30-33 d were needed to spike under 20/15 or 15/20 °C. In a fourth experiment, a Doritaenopsis hybrid spiked after 22, 21, or 25 d under 25/25, 25/20, or 20/20 °C. However, 37 d was required to spike under 20/15 °C. These results suggest that the best temperature range for spiking these orchids is 25 to 20 °C and a day/night temperature differential is not needed for spiking when temperature is at or below 25 °C.