Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 584 items for :

  • "defoliation" x
  • All content x
Clear All
Free access

Michael W. Smith and Becky S. Cheary

particular genes for transcription ( Kouzarides, 2007 ; Nelissen et al., 2007 ). Premature defoliation, i.e., before a normal killing frost, of the entire tree markedly reduces pistillate flowers the next year ( Hinrichs, 1962 ; Worley, 1979a ). Early

Free access

Muntubani D.S. Nzima, George C. Martin, and Chic Nishijima

Early fall (September) defoliation and late spring (early June) shading of “off” and “on” pistachio trees were used to test two hypotheses: that 1) fall defoliation would reduce carbohydrate storage sufficiently to suppress spring growth and 2) spring shading would reduce carbohydrate status and increase inflorescence bud abscission. Defoliation suppressed initial leaf area expansion the following spring on current year shoots of “off” but not “on” trees respectively. Suppression of leaf size was correlated with the initial low concentration of carbohydrates in organs of individual branches of the tree. Fruiting and artificial shading in June had more dramatic effects on growth parameters than defoliating. Shading “off” trees for 14 days in early June accelerated abscission of inflorescence buds, reduced dry mass of individual leaves, buds, current year and 1-year-old shoots. Shading also reduced the concentration of total nonstructural carbohydrates (TNC) of these organs in “off” and “on” trees. Fruiting suppressed leaf size and leaf dry mass by 20% and 30% among individual branches of undefoliated and defoliated trees respectively. Low carbohydrate concentrations in individual branches and inflorescence buds following shading were closely correlated with the abscission of inflorescence buds.

Free access

Mokhles A. Elsysy and Peter M. Hirst

; Harley et al., 1942 ), and may be a practice to manipulate biennial bearing because partial defoliation in off-years prevents excessive flower formation in on-years ( Davis, 1957 ; Fulford, 1960 ). In these studies, partial defoliation reduced but did

Full access

Mokhles A. Elsysy and Peter M. Hirst

( Elsysy et al., 2019 ). Flower induction genes have been shown to be active in the leaves ( Hanke et al., 2007 ). Flower formation is affected by leaf area ( Sahulka, 1967 ), and defoliation decreased flower formation ( Elsysy and Hirst, 2017 ; Fulford

Free access

Francisco Javier López-Escudero, Miguel Ángel Blanco-López, Carmen Del Río Rincón, and Juan Manuel Caballero Reig

; Serrhini and Zeroual, 1995 ). Particularly, the disease has been described as a major problem in soils infested with highly virulent defoliating isolates of the pathogen in Andalucía (southern Spain) ( López-Escudero and Blanco-López, 2001 ), where more

Free access

Theo J. Blom and Richard B. Smith

Summer-grown Hydrangea macrophylla subsp. macrophylla var. macrophylla (Thunb.) were exposed for 1 week to CzH4 at 0,0.5,2.0,5.0,50, or 500 μl·liter-1 in dark storage at 16C for defoliation before cold storage. The number of leaves remaining per shoot for all cultivars decreased with C2H4 concentration, and >5 μl C2H4/liter was effective in defoliating `Kasteln', `Mathilda Gutges', and `Todi' but not `Merritt's Supreme'.

Free access

Guihong Bi and Carolyn F. Scagel

During production of florists’ hydrangea, defoliation before cold storage is required for prevention of diseases such as botrytis bud rot ( Bailey, 1989 ). Many hydrangea growers manually remove leaves before natural leaf abscission. This practice

Open access

Tripti Vashisth and Taylor Livingston

can be observed. On the other hand, vigorous vegetative growth following a pruning or defoliation treatment is a common observation in citrus ( Eissenstat and Duncan, 1992 ; Phillips, 1978 ). Consequently, it is likely that the new growth emergence is

Open access

David C. Zlesak, Darcy Ballantyne, Matthew Holen, Andrea Clark, Stan C. Hokanson, Kristen Smith, Jason D. Zurn, Nahla V. Bassil, and James M. Bradeen

/wet climates due to the potential for rapid defoliation of susceptible cultivars. Repeated defoliation events can weaken plants, leading to diminished aesthetics; in severe cases, they can contribute to plant death (e.g., winterkill). Outdoor-grown roses are

Full access

Thiago Vieira da Costa, João Alexio Scarpare Filho, and Matthew W. Fidelibus

practices that increase fruit exposure to the sun. Practices such as separating fruit-bearing canes from sterile renewal shoots and defoliation of the fruiting zone have been suggested as possible ways to improve fruit drying ( Fidelibus et al., 2007