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Xuelian Jiang, Yueling Zhao, Rui Wang, and Sheng Zhao

tomato production. A reasonable deficit irrigation strategy subjects crops to some degree of water deficit but maintains satisfactory yield ( Pereira et al., 2002 ). Such a strategy saves significant quantities of irrigation water, reduces production

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Xuelian Jiang, Yueling Zhao, Ling Tong, Rui Wang, and Sheng Zhao

factor in tomato growth, yield, and fruit quality ( Chen et al., 2014 ; Sun et al., 2013 ; Wang et al., 2015 ). Many studies have shown that deficit irrigation improves tomato fruit quality because it leads to increased amounts of sugar, VC, and beta

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Jinmin Fu, Jack Fry, and Bingru Huang

Engelke, 1999 ). Irrigation deficits can be achieved by lengthening periods between irrigations or applying water more frequently at levels less than actual ET, which has been the approach of the aforementioned researchers. Deficit irrigation in the

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Jason E. Stout, Joan R. Davenport, and R. Troy Peters

three regulated deficit irrigation treatments (−25%, −33%, and −45% of control) applied to ‘Concord’ grape from bloom through veraison for four growing seasons (2011–14). Initially, irrigation applications were tracked by constant communication with the

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David A. Goldhamer, Elias Fereres, Merce Mata, Joan Girona, and Moshe Cohen

To characterize tree responses to water deficits in shallow and deep rooted conditions, parameters developed using daily oscillations from continuously measured soil water content and trunk diameter were compared with traditional discrete monitoring of soil and plant water status in lysimeter and field-grown peach trees [Prunus persica (L.) Batsch `O'Henry']. Evaluation occurred during the imposition of deficit irrigation for 21 days followed by full irrigation for 17 days. The maximum daily available soil water content fluctuations (MXAWCF) taken at any of the four monitored root zone depths responded most rapidly to the deficit irrigation. The depth of the MXAWCF increased with time during the deficit irrigation. Differences relative to a fully irrigated control were greater in the lysimeter than the field-grown trees. Minimum daily trunk diameter (MNTD) and maximum daily trunk shrinkage (MDS) responded sooner than midday stem water potential (stem Ψ), predawn or midday leaf water potential (predawn leaf Ψ and leaf Ψ), or photosynthesis (A). Parameters based on trunk diameter monitoring, including maximum daily trunk diameter (MXTD), correlated well with established physiological parameters of tree water status. Statistical analysis of the differences in the measured parameters relative to fully irrigated trees during the first 10 days of deficit irrigation ranked the sensitivity of the parameters in the lysimeter as MXAWCF > MNTD > MDS > MXTD > stem Ψ = A = predawn leaf Ψ = leaf Ψ. Equivalent analysis with the field-grown trees ranked the sensitivity of the parameters as MXAWCF > MNTD > MDS > stem Ψ = leaf Ψ = MXTD = predawn leaf Ψ > A. Following a return to full irrigation in the lysimeter, MDS and all the discrete measurements except A quickly returned to predeficit irrigation levels. Tree recovery in the field-grown trees was slower and incomplete due to inadequate filling of the root zone. Fruit size was significantly reduced in the lysimeter while being minimally affected in the field-grown trees. Parameters only available from continuous monitoring hold promise for improving the precision of irrigation decision-making over the use of discrete measurements.

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Jinmin Fu, Jack Fry, and Bingru Huang

Water availability is becoming limited across many areas of the United States. In recent years, deficit irrigation, or application of water at levels less than maximum evapotranspiration (ET) demand, has been practiced as a strategy to minimize

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Reagan W. Hejl, Benjamin G. Wherley, James C. Thomas, and Richard H. White

One means of achieving water conservation in turf management is by providing water at rates below a plant’s maximal consumptive water use, otherwise known as deficit irrigation ( Feldhake et al., 1984 ; Fry and Butler, 1989 ; Qian and Engelke

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Clinton C. Shock, Erik B.G. Feibert, and Lamont D. Saunders

Potato response to water stress and changes in soil available-N levels in relation to irrigation management were evaluated in 1992, 1993, and 1994. Potatoes were grown on silt loam with sprinkler irrigation in an adequately irrigated check (100% of crop evapotranspiration replaced at –60 kPa) and three deficit irrigation regimes. Water stress treatments were achieved by partial or complete replacement of crop evapotranspiration when soil water potential reached –80 kPa. In 1992 and 1994, relatively warm years, tuber yield and grade were significantly reduced by water stress. In 1993, a relatively cool year, yield was reduced by water stress, but grade was not. Each year, soil available-N accounting for the season showed large surpluses for all treatments. Potato cultivars grown as subplots varied in their response to deficit irrigation.

Open access

Kuan Qin and Daniel I. Leskovar

optimized practices with high-yielding varieties ( Tilman et al., 2011 ). Several abiotic stresses can be alleviated through appropriate management strategies. For example, deficit irrigation is a well-established method used to save water while maintaining

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Daniel I. Leskovar, Shinsuke Agehara, Kilsun Yoo, and Nuria Pascual-Seva

stressing plants to a certain profitable level. This management technique is generally known as deficit irrigation. If irrigation rates are reduced at predetermined developmental stages where deficits would not severely impact productivity, it is called