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Erik S. Runkle, Royal D. Heins, Arthur C. Cameron, and William H. Carlson

In 1996 and 1997, eight cultivars of cold-treated field-grown Astilbe were grown in a 20 °C green-house with short days (SDs = 9-h natural days) or long days (LDs = 9-h natural days with night interruption with incandescent lamps from 2200 to 0200 hr) to determine how photoperiod influences flowering. Cultivars studied were Astilbe × arendsii Arends `Bridal Veil', `Cattleya', `Fanal', and `Spinell'; A. chinensis Franch. `Superba'; A. japonica A. Gray `Deutschland' and `Peach Blossom'; and A. thunbergii Miq. `Ostrich Plume'. Flowering percentage was highest (≥90%) for `Cattleya', `Deutschland', `Fanal', `Ostrich Plume', and `Peach Blossom', regardless of photoperiod. Photoperiod did not affect the time to visible inflorescence or flower number for any cultivar studied. The time from visible inflorescence to first flower took 27 to 36 days, irrespective of photoperiod. Time to flower varied by cultivar; `Deutschland' was the earliest to flower (31 to 41 days) and `Superba' was the last to flower (51 to 70 days). `Fanal' and `Ostrich Plume' flowered slightly but significantly faster (by 1 to 6 days) under LDs than SDs. For five cultivars, the inflorescence was taller under LDs than SDs. All cultivars reached visible inflorescence and flower significantly faster (by 1 to 15 days) in 1997 than in 1996.

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W. Garrett Owen, Qingwu Meng, and Roberto G. Lopez

in response to different photoperiods, the six crops in our study can be divided into three categories: long-day plants (petunia and snapdragon), short-day plants (african marigold and sunflower), and day-neutral plants (pansy and zinnia). High DLIs

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Amanda M. Miller, James M. Garner, and Allan M. Armitage

Five cultivars of the Angel Mist series of Angelonia angustifolia L. were evaluated in the Univ. of Georgia New Crop Program to determine the influence of temperature, irradiance, and photoperiod on crop growth and flowering. When the temperature was increased from 15 to 30 °C, days to visible bud and days to flower significantly decreased while height of flowers, vegetative height, and total height significantly increased. As irradiance increased, plant growth increased but little influence on flowering time was observed. Angelonia angustifolia appears to be a day-neutral plant with respect to flowering. The influence on growth regulators will also be discussed.

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Abraham H. Halevy, Eitan Shlomo, and Ofra Ziv

Experiments aiming to adapt the perennial balloon flower (Platycodon grandiflorus) as a commercial cut flower crop were conducted for 4 years under various growing conditions: four controlled-temperature rooms at two photoperiods in a phytotron, heated and unheated greenhouses, and a saran net-house (15% shade). Best flower yield was obtained following crown cooling for 12 weeks at 2 to 4 °C. Platycodon is a day-neutral plant, but produce more flowering stems under long days. Flower initiation and development is enhanced with increased growing temperature from 17/12 °C (day/night) to 27/22 °C. At very high temperatures (32/24 °C), however, only a few flowers are formed. Best quality stems were produced at 12 to 14 °C night temperature. At higher night temperatures, flowering stems were thin and weak. Gibberellin treatments to the crowns and the plants did not affect flowering time. Chemical name used: gibberellin (GA3).

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Erik S. Runkle, Royal D. Heins, Arthur C. Cameron, and William H. Carlson

Thirty herbaceous perennial species were treated at 5°C for 0 or 15 weeks. Critical photoperiods for flower initiation and development with and without a cold treatment were determined. Photoperiods were 10, 12, 13, 14, 16, or 24 hours of continuous light or 9 hours plus a 4-hour night interruption. Continuous photo-periodic treatments consisted of 9-hour natural days extended with light from incandescent lamps. Species were categorized into nine response types based on the effects of cold and photoperiod on flowering. Plants had three flowering responses to cold treatment: obligate, facultative, or none. The perennials were obligate long-day, facultative long-day, or day-neutral plants. For example, Campanula carpatica `Blue Clips' had no response to cold and was an obligate long-day plant requiring photoperiods of 16 hours or longer or night interruption for flowering. Rudbeckia fulgida `Goldsturm' had a facultative response to cold and required photoperiods of 14 hours or longer or night interruption for flowering. Veronica longifolia `Sunny Border Blue' had an obligate cold requirement and was day-neutral. Some species responded differently to photoperiod before and after cold. Leucanthemum ×superbum `Snow Cap' flowered as an obligate long-day plant without cold and as a facultative long-day plant after cold. Response categories are discussed.

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Brooks Whitton and Will Healy

Aeschynanthus `Koral' plants were grown in photoperiods of 8 to 14 hr (8 hr natural daylight plus 0-6 hr incandescent light of 3 μmolm-2s-1) beginning January, March, or June. The number of weeks to anthesis and number of leaves on shoots reaching anthesis were not affected by photoperiod, but differed when treatments began. Number of shoots reaching anthesis per plant was greatest in photoperiods of 13 hr for treatments beginning January or June. Time of year influenced flowering more than photoperiod, suggesting a temperature interaction. A. `Koral' plants were given photoperiods of 12 or 24 hr (daylight fluorescent lamps at 100 or 50 μmolm-2s-1 respectively) at temperatures of 18 or 24 C. After 8 weeks, 18 C plants had fewer nodes before the first flower bud than 24 C plants. Number of nodes to the first flower bud was decreased under the 24 hr treatments at 24 C, while no difference to photoperiod was observed at 18 C. Flowering of A. `Koral' appears to be promoted by 18 C temperature where the plant behaves as a day neutral plant. At 24 C, A. `Koral' responds as a long day plant.

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Mei Yuan, William H. Carlson, Royal D. Heins, and Arthur C. Cameron

Most plants have a postgermination juvenile phase in which flower induction will not occur. Some species require a cold period for flower induction and will not respond to the cold treatments during the juvenile phase. We determined juvenile phases of Coreopsis grandiflora `Sunray', Gaillardia grandiflora `Goblin', Heuchera sanguinea `Bressingham', and Rudbeckia fulgida `Goldsturm'. Plants were exposed to 5C for 0, 10, or 15 weeks when Coreopsis had 0, 2, 4, 6, 8, or 10 leaves (>1 cm); Gallardia, 4, 8, 12, or 16 leaves; Heuchera, 8, 12, 16, or 20 leaves; Rudbeckia, 5, 10, 15, or 20 leaves. Plants were grown under a 4-h night interruption lighting (LD) or under a 9-h photoperiod (SD) after cold treatments. Based on time to flower and final leaf count, the juvenility of Coreopsis, Gaillardia, Heuchera, and Rudbeckia ended when they had about 6, 10, 12, and 15 leaves, respectively. Cold treatments were necessary for flower induction of Coreopsis and Heuchera and they increased the flowering percentage of Gaillardia and Rudbeckia. Heuhera was a day-neutral plant, Rudbeckia was on obligate LD plant, and Gaillardia and Coreopsis were quantitative LD plants.

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Teresa A. Cerny, James E. Faust, Desmond R. Layne, and Nihal C. Rajapakse

Growth chambers constructed of photoselective plastic films were used to investigate light quality effects on flowering and stem elongation of six flowering plant species under strongly inductive and weakly inductive photoperiods. Three films were used: a clear control film, a far red (FR) light absorbing (AFR) film and a red (R) light absorbing (AR) film. The AFR and AR films intercepted FR (700 to 800 nm) and R (600 to 700 nm) wavelengths with maximum interception at 730 and 690 nm, respectively. The phytochrome photoequilibrium estimates of transmitted light for the control, AFR, and AR films were 0.71, 0.77, and 0.67. The broad band R:FR ratios were 1.05, 1.51, and 0.77, respectively. The photosynthetic photon flux was adjusted with neutral density filters to provide similar light transmission among chambers. Zinnia elegans Jacq., Dendranthema×grandiflorum Kitam. (chrysanthemum), Cosmos bipinnatus Cav., and Petunia×hybrida Vilm.-Andr. plants grown under the AFR film were shorter than control plants. The AFR film had no effect on height of Antirrhinum majus L. (snapdragon) or Rosa×hybrida (miniature rose). Anthesis of zinnia, chrysanthemum, cosmos (short-day plants), and miniature rose (day-neutral plant) was not influenced by the AFR films. Anthesis of petunia and snapdragon (long-day plants) was delayed up to 13 days by AFR films under weakly inductive photoperiods. In petunia, initiation and development of floral structures were not affected by the AFR films during strongly inductive photoperiods. However, during weakly inductive photoperiods, initiation of the floral primordia was significantly delayed and overall development of the floral meristem was slower than control plants indicating that the AFR films could increase the production time if long-day plants were produced off-season. Daylength extension with electric light sources could overcome this delay in anthesis yet achieve the benefit of AFR films for height reduction without the use of chemical growth regulators.

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James Hancock, Cholani Weebadde, and Sedat Serçe

’, Weebadde et al. (2008) found the proportion of day-neutral plants to be ≈50% in Maryland, Michigan, and Minnesota, whereas percentages were over 80% in California and Oregon. This environmentally induced variation in the percentage of day-neutral progeny

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Stephanie A. Beeks and Michael R. Evans

). Cyclamen was chosen for this study because it was a long-term greenhouse crop and a day-neutral plant. All containers were placed in a glass-glazed greenhouse in Fayetteville, AR, on 1 m × 1 m × 15-cm ebb-and-flood benches. Greenhouse air temperatures