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Anthony L. Witcher, Eugene K. Blythe, Glenn B. Fain, and Kenneth J. Curry

Cutting propagation is the most widely used method for cloning nursery and floriculture crops. Some of the factors that affect successful cutting propagation include stock plant quality, timing of propagation, propagation environment, container size

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Eugene K. Blythe and Jeff L. Sibley

IBA + 0 ppm NAA to 1000 ppm IBA + 500 ppm NAA. The elimination of unneeded steps is critical to improving nursery production processes ( Blythe and Sibley, 2001 ). Baldwin and Stanley (1981) , in discussing work flow and costing in cutting propagation

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Eugene K. Blythe

., 2007 ). Materials and methods This experiment was initiated with collection, preparation, treatment, and placement of cuttings on 4 Feb. 2008. Cutting propagation material was collected from mature plants of 18 different, unnamed clones (each clone

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Eugene K. Blythe and Jeff L. Sibley

stem cuttings of Heller’s japanese holly could be propagated without use of a conventional basal quick-dip in auxin, thus eliminating one step in the cutting propagation process and reducing chemical use. Materials and methods Cutting propagation

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Kathryn M. Santos, Paul R. Fisher, Thomas Yeager, Eric H. Simonne, Hannah S. Carter, and William R. Argo

Appropriate timing and concentration of nutrient supply in vegetative cutting propagation affects root development, uniformity of plant growth, uptake efficiency [(nutrient taken up/total nutrient applied-nutrients in substrate)*100], nutrient

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Kathryn M. Santos, Paul R. Fisher, and William R. Argo

during vegetative cutting propagation can be divided into tissue, substrate, and leachate. Tissue uptake was calculated by change in percent nutrient × DW from week 0 to week 4, and uptake efficiency was calculated from Eq. 4, in which A = tissue uptake

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Rachel Emrick, D. L. Creech, and G. Bickerstaff

This project tested rates of lignite-activated water (LAW) for its influence on seed germination, cutting propagation, and plant performance. LAW is a product of CAW Industries, Rapid City, S.D. LAW is water-activated by lignite in a process that includes the addition of sulfated castor oil, calcium chloride, magnesium sulfate, sodium meta silicate, and fossilized organics from refined lignite. LAW is reported to improve many plant performance traits. Four rates were used in this study. Seed germination trials indicated no significant differences in germination percentage with LAW applications with the two species tested, Echinacea purpurea and Hibiscus dasycalyx. In a “closed” system, LAW enhanced cutting propagation success of Aster caroliniana, Cuphea micropetala, and Verbena `Homestead Purple', as measured by percent rooting and dry weight of roots produced. Cutting propagation of two woody species, Illicium henryi and Rosa banksiae, was not improved with LAW additions. In the SFASU Arboretum, pansy performance, as measured by plant dry weight, was improved one month after establishment.

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Brian K. Maynard and Nina L. Bassuk

In a study of stock plant etiolation and stem banding, stem cuttings of upright European hornbeam (Carpinus betulus L. `Fastigiata') were taken at 2-week intervals over 4 months following budbreak and rooted under intermittent mist for 30 days. Percent rooting and root counts declined with increasing cutting age. Stock plant etiolation and stem banding increased percent rooting and root counts throughout the study, with the combination of both treatments yielding the best rooting. In nontreated stems, > 75% rooting was achieved only within 4 weeks of budbreak. Etiolation and stem banding resulted in rooting ≥ 75% up to 3 months after budbreak. In two shading studies, stock plants were grown in a glass greenhouse under 0%, 50%, 75%, or 95% shade, or initially etiolated (100% shade) for 1.5 days. Cuttings were taken after 2.5 and 60 days and treated with IBA concentrations ranging from 0 to 4.9 mm before rooting under intermittent mist for 30 days. Percent rooting increased proportionally to the degree of shading, with a maximum response at 95% shade. Cuttings taken at 60 days were less responsive to etiolation and shading than those harvested at 25 days. Auxin concentration interacted with shading to yield, at 95% shade and 3.7 mm IBA, the highest rooting percentage and the greatest root counts and lengths. Light exclusion by etiolation, stem banding, or shading can extend the cutting propagation season by increasing rooting responses and increasing the sensitivity of stem cuttings to exogenously applied auxin. Chemical name used: 1H-indole-3-butyric acid (IBA).

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Jun Gu Lee*, Jong Nam Lee, Eung Ho Lee, and Byoung Yil Lee

Lowbush blueberry (Vaccinium angustifolium Ait.) have some potential agricultural benefits for soil covering and high nutritive antioxidant fruit production in highland of South Korea. As a preliminary research step to introduce and to rapidly propagate the lowbush blueberry in South Korea, we evaluated the cutting propagation efficiency under several cutting conditions. The pH of peatmoss media were adjusted to five target values of 4.5, 5.0, 5.5, 6.0, and control with air-slaked lime. Peat-moss were mixed with perlite at five levels of volume ratios in separate experimental design. The cuttings were also prepared with the three cutting regions from mother stock shoots and the number of nodes per cutting. The rooting of V. angustifolium cuttings initiated at 50 days after cutting in nursery bed, and at 70 days after cutting, shallow root ball were developed by 0.5 cm diameter. The rooting rate and root ball development were favorable in the pH 4.5 and nonadjusted control (pH 4.15) while the mixed ratio of perlite did not affect on rooting efficiency ranging from 30% to 50% mixed treatment. Terminal and intermediate region from newly developed shoot performed higher cutting efficiency compared to the basal region, and four to six nodes per each cutting showed favorable shoot growth and root ball development compared to the 2-node cutting. Thus the cutting of upper shoot region having four to six nodes in acidic peatmoss nursery containing 30% to 50% perlite might be suitable preliminary screened conditions. The cutting propagation efficiency of the five lowbush blueberry clones were also evaluated depending on the summer and early spring cutting.

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Christopher J. Currey and Roberto G. Lopez

. (2008) reported large variation among fertilization application practices in propagation facilities. It is common practice for producers to begin providing WSF during the first week of cutting propagation, either through mist application or substrate