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Jeff B. Million and Thomas H. Yeager

investigated the capture of sprinkler irrigation by container-grown plants. Beeson and Knox (1991) reported CF less than 1 for two Rhododendron species and Pittosporum tobira indicating that these three species directed water away from the container. CF

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Diane Feliciano Cayanan, Mike Dixon, Youbin Zheng and Jennifer Llewellyn

study was to determine whether a free chlorine concentration of 2.4 mg·L −1 would harm common container-grown nursery plants when applied under commercial nursery practices during the period of shoot emergence and growth and whether such a treatment

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Rick A. Boydston, Treva Anderson and Steven F. Vaughn

The use of herbicides in container-grown ornamentals is often limited as a result of the lack of registered products for use in greenhouses and the difficulty in assuring crop safety on numerous species grown in ornamental nurseries. Typically

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Jayesh B. Samtani, Gary J. Kling, Hannah M. Mathers and Luke Case

weeds in a more cost-effective manner. Issues pertaining to direct herbicide application in container-grown ornamental plants include the need for repeated herbicide application, nonuniform applications of herbicide, herbicide loss to the environment

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Nastaran Basiri Jahromi, Amy Fulcher, Forbes Walker, James Altland, Wesley Wright and Neal Eash

microirrigation used during the greenhouse experiment. The goal of this study was to evaluate the impact of on-demand irrigation scheduling and hardwood biochar amendment on plant water use and biomass gain of container-grown Hydrangea paniculata ‘Silver Dollar

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Carolyn F. Scagel, Guihong Bi, Leslie H. Fuchigami and Richard P. Regan

Container-grown nursery plants commonly exhibit low recovery of nutrients from fertilizer, suggesting nutrient management practices can be improved by understanding when and how plants most efficiently take up nutrients ( Colangelo and Brand, 2001

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Aaron L. Warsaw, R. Thomas Fernandez, Bert M. Cregg and Jeffrey A. Andresen

Container-grown plants require frequent irrigation because substrate volumes and fast drainage limit the quantities of water and nutrients available for plant uptake. Water draining from containers carries nutrients and potentially other

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Amanda J. Taylor, R. Thomas Fernandez, Pascal Nzokou and Bert Cregg

conventional, once-a-day irrigation. The objectives of this study were to 1) determine effects of cyclic irrigation programs on growth of container-grown conifers; and 2) explore underlying physiological mechanisms including various indicators of WUE. Materials

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Andrew G. Ristvey, John D. Lea-Cox and David S. Ross

grown in the nursery and landscape industry throughout the United States. There are few data on nutrient uptake and use efficiency for container-grown azalea. A few studies on other species such as poinsettia ( Euphorbia pulcherrima Wild.) ( Ku and

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Carolyn F. Scagel, Guihong Bi, Leslie H. Fuchigami and Richard P. Regan

for certain nutrient deficiencies ( Buljovcic and Engels, 2001 ; Scheiber et al., 2008 ; Silber et al., 2003 ; Xu et al., 2004 ). Many commercially important qualities of container-grown plants are a function of nutrients and water availability