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T.R. Roper, D.L. Mahr, and P. Kaarakka

Cranberry Crop Manager is a predictive software package for commercial cranberry growers. The package consists of linked modules. Predictive models for insect, disease, and weed development are the most important features. With appropriate weather and scouting information the models will make control or no control recommendations. To support the predictive models the program will maintain weather records of air temperatures, evapotranspiration, irrigation, and rainfall. Data can be imported or entered by hand. The program will maintain bed records including pesticide applicators, pesticide and fertilizer applications, and scouting reports. Output options include screen or printed reports or data export. An electronic encyclopedia of cranberry disease, insect and weed pests on CD will accompany the package. Minimum computer requirements are 486 CPU, 6 MB RAM, 6 MB hard drive space.

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W.R. Stevenson, D. Curwen, K.A. Kelling, J.A. Wyman, L.K. Binning, and T.R. Connell

The Wisconsin potato crop is managed intensively through multiple inputs of pesticide, fertilizer, and irrigation. Beginning in 1979, a multidisciplinary team at the Univ. of Wisconsin developed an effective Integrated Pest Management Program to address key management decisions associated with this crop. The program fostered the development of several private IPM businesses and continues to help increase the acceptance of IPM technology by the potato industry. Results of component and integrative research, funded by industry, state, and federal sources, provided the essential ingredients for development of computer software now used for managing the potato crop on ≈ 70,000 acres (28,330 ha) of potatoes in a multistate area. The software helps growers determine the need for and timing of critical crop inputs. By reducing or eliminating unneeded pesticide and irrigation applications, the software helps to improve overall production efficiency. Industry adoption of this software is providing the impetus for development of more comprehensive software that includes additional aspects of potato production as well as the production of crops grown in rotation with potato.

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Shahrokh Khanizadeh

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P.C. St. Amand and D.R. La Bonte

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D. Bassi, E. Muzzi, P. Negri, and R. Selli

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James Nienhuis, Mary K. Slocum, Dawn A. DeVos, and Roger Muren

Genetic similarities were calculated among 89 Brassica oleracea L. genotypes, which included 62 broccolis (var. italica), 16 cauliflowers (var. botrytis), and 11 cabbages (var. capitata). These entries represented a wide range of commercially available germplasm, including open-pollinated cultivars, commercial hybrids, the inbred parents of several hybrid cultivars, and 27 entries that were provided as unknowns. Sixteen random genomic clones were used as probes in Southern hybridizations to detect restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP). From each of the random probes, an average of four polymorphic bands were classified as to their presence or absence for each genotype. The genetic similarity between ail pairs of genotypes was calculated. A multidimensional scaling (MDS) plot indicated that the broccoli, cauliflower, and cabbage groups were clustered with very little overlap. Within groups, genetic similarity corresponded to relationships based on available pedigree information. Comparison of banding patterns between hypothetical and actual hybrids was used to correctly identify the parents of several parent-hybrid combinations. The RFLP pattern of a hybrid and one of the parents (female) were used to predict the genotype and identity of the other parent (male).

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John W. Scott

where the images will be processed with the computer software. Table 1. Required field passport data for tomato standardized phenotype trials. Table 2. Standardized phenotype descriptions for tomato SolCAP project

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T.M. Waliczek, P. Logan, and J.M. Zajicek

The main objective of this study was to investigate the impact of an outdoor environmental program, Math and Science in the Outdoor Classroom, on elementary grade students' creative and critical thinking, and attitudes toward math and science. Math and Science in the Outdoor Classroom is an on-campus nature program in Santa Fe, N.M. Students participated in half-day programs focusing on topics such as water, insects, soil, and weather. Twenty-one teachers from five schools volunteered 175 second through sixth graders to participate in the program and research study. Surveys were administered to students, teachers, and volunteers after completion of the program. Interview data was analyzed using QSR NUD*IST (Nonnumerical Unstructured Data Indexing Searching and Theory-building) computer-assisted qualitative data analysis system to examine respondents' perceptions of the program using Bloom's taxonomy as a theoretical framework. Results indicated that students not only learned math and science at the lower levels of Bloom's taxonomy, but were also thinking at the higher levels of synthesis and evaluation within the framework.

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Robert L. Wample, Guy Reisenauer, Andy Bary, and Fred Schuetze

A computerized system capable of controlling the freezing rate and collecting, storing, and analyzing data from multiple samples to determine their freezing point using low-temperature exotherm analysis is described. Details include electrical diagrams of modifications to the multiplexer/amplifier interface to provide additional signal amplification and permit control of the freezer's compressor. Computer software is described that permits variable temperature decline rates. Data analysis consists of a program in “C” that sequentially compares each data point in a low-temperature exotherm profile. Low-temperature exotherms are identified by a user-specified minimum differential between sequential data points. Examples of exotherm output and data analysis are given.

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Bruno C. Moser

Information on the Internet relative to the landscape and nursery industries is rapidly expanding. However, finding reliable sites on subjects of interest to the field of commercial landscape horticulture is a difficult task. PLANT: Purdue Landscape and Nursery Thesaurus, is an extensive database of links to Internet information for professional landscape contractors/managers and nursery growers in Midwest and Northeast states. PLANT currently consists of 21 independent pages on topics from “Computer Software” to “Winter Hardiness”, with >2500 links to appropriate Internet information. A search mode allows one to search the database by key words as well. This extension-based tool is also an excellent resource for class assignments in the area of ornamentals and landscape horticulture. As a work in process, PLANT is regularly updated and expanded to provide multiple sources if Internet information on topics of interest to the landscape and nursery industries. PLANT can be found at bluestem.hort.purdue.edu/plant/.