Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 12 items for :

  • "community forestry" x
  • All content x
Clear All
Full access

Virginia I. Lohr and Caroline H. Pearson-Mims

This research protocol was approved by the WSU Human Subjects Institutional Review Board. Financial support was provided in part by the U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service Urban and Community Forestry Program on the recommendation of the

Free access

M.L. Witt, W.M. Fountain, R.L. Geneve, and D.L. Olszowy

America the Beautiful and Urban and Community Forestry grant programs, part of the expanded Forestry Title of the 1990 Farm Bill, authorized funding to encourage citizen involvement in creating and supporting long-term and sustained urban and community forestry programs. U.K. Woody Ornamental scientists and the KY Division of Forestry Urban Forestry Coordinator planned and implemented the following educational programs to this end: 1) comprehensive training manual on Managing Trees in the Urban Environment, including a guide for the care and protection of trees, grant application, and managing of volunteers; 2) three publications on small, medium-sized, and large trees for urban spaces; 3) interactive hypertext version of tree selector publications; 4) statewide workshops on Trees in Communities; 5) annual statewide Urban Forestry Short Course; 5) Plant Health Care and Hazard Trees workshops for arborists. The comprehensive program brings city planners, government personnel, public work's personnel, arborists, builders and developers, horticulturists and landscape architects, tree board members, homeowners' associations, Master Gardeners, and other community volunteers together to support quality programming for preservation and enhancement of valuable natural resource of trees.

Full access

Charles R. Hall, Alan W. Hodges, and John J. Haydu

This research was made possible by a grant from the National Urban and Community Forestry Advisory Committee of the U.S. Forest Service, along with funding from the American Nursery and Landscape Association (ANLA) and the Associated Landscape

Full access

Susan D. Day, Sheri T. Dorn, Diane Relf, and J. Roger Harris

The Virginia Cooperative Extension (VCE) Advanced Master Gardener-Tree Steward (AMGTS) program provides advanced training in leadership development and arboriculture to MG volunteer educators so they may expand the influence of extension through leadership in community forestry. A statewide survey of agents, MGs, and foresters served as the basis for developing the training package, which was funded in part by the Virginia Department of Forestry. According to a statewide survey, 70% of VCE MGs and extension agents with MG programs would like to be involved in community tree programming, while only 26% was currently involved. Typically, agents cited limited staff and volunteer resources as the primary factors in restricting program expansion. Furthermore, 90% of municipal foresters indicated they would like to work with trained volunteers. The AMGTS program simultaneously answers the desire of MGs to expand their role in the community landscape and the need of VCE to expand its outreach with increasingly limited resources. AMGTS training, guided by a 10-unit resource book, integrates technical and program management expertise to foster volunteer pride and self-sufficiency. This allows MG tree stewards to coordinate much of their own training and recruit and manage non-MG volunteers to whom they can provide limited training for specific projects, thus allowing program expansion without additional staff. The training is designed for delivery by knowledgeable professionals in the local community, such as arborists, horticulturists, college professors, extension specialists, MGs, and others who can provide quality training following the program guidelines.

Free access

Susan D. Day, Sheri T. Dorn, Diane Relf, and J. Roger Harris

Virginia Cooperative Extension's (VCE) Master Gardener!Tree Steward program (MGTS) provides advanced training in leadership development and arboriculture to Master Gardener (MG) volunteer educators so that they may expand the influence of extension through leadership in community forestry. According to a statewide survey, 70% of VCE MGs and agents with MG programs would like to be involved in community tree programming. Only 26% were currently involved. Typically, agents cite limited staff and volunteer resources as the primary factors in restricting program expansion. Furthermore, 90% of municipal foresters indicated they would like to work with trained volunteers. The MGTS program simultaneously answers the desire of MGs to expand their role in the community landscape and the need of VCE to expand its outreach with increasingly limited resources. MGTS training, guided by a 10-unit resource book, integrates technical and program management expertise to foster volunteer pride and self-sufficiency. This allows MGTSs to coordinate much of their own training and recruit and manage large numbers of non-MG volunteers to whom they can provide limited training for specific projects, thus, allowing program expansion without additional staff.

Free access

Nicholas Polanin, Madeline Flahive DiNardo, William T. Hlubik, and Barry Emens

New Jersey has two active quarantines currently under the jurisdiction of the USDA's Cooperative Asian Longhorned Beetle (ALB) Eradication Project. Encompassing just over twenty (20.2) square miles, these quarantines are located in the northeastern and central coastal regions of the state, in close proximity to the ports of New York, Newark, and Elizabeth. Public education and media outreach have been instrumental in confirming the presence of ALB in New Jersey, as both quarantines are the result of citizens' reports. Twenty five personnel have been directly assigned to this eradication effort, with outside contractors taking up the remaining effort. Nearly 33,000 trees have been inspected, resulting in 11,000 (33%) removals of infested or high-risk host species trees. Major losses have occurred in populations of Norway and red maple, London planetree, and American elm, species which have received widespread praise (and unfortunate over-planting) for their tolerance of urban planting sites. Regulatory Contracts (597) and Compliance Agreements (137) were necessary to formalize the quarantine and to create strong working partnerships between the USDA, municipalities, and industry to gain access to all trees and to control the movement of all “green material” in the quarantine areas. Municipalities currently cooperating in the New Jersey Community Forestry Program have begun offsetting this major deforestation and canopy cover loss with the planting of 2,545 nonhost trees, with full reforestation expected over the next several years. In addition, >22,000 trees have been treated with Imidacloprid as a possible deterrent to any activity or spread of ALB in the Garden State.

Free access

Roland Ebel and Clinton C. Shock

concerning community forestry at the turn of the century. Regional Community Forestry Training Center, Bangkok, Thailand Reed, H. 2009 Occupational profile horticultural consultant. Association of Graduate Careers Advisory Services. 16 Jan. 2017. < http://130

Free access

John J. Haydu, Alan. W. Hodges, and Charles R. Hall

Impacts of the Green Industry in the United States USDA/NUCFAC Final report to the National Urban and Community Forestry Advisory Committee, 81 pages < http://www.utextension.utk.edu/hbin.greenimpact.html >. Haydu, J.J. Beeson

Open access

Ariana P. Torres, Susan S. Barton, and Bridget K. Behe

. Econ. Stat. 73 318 330 Hall, C.R. Haydu, J.J. Hodges, A.W. 2005 Economic impacts of the green industry in the United States: Final report to the National Urban and Community Forestry Advisory Committee. 3 Mar. 2019. < https

Free access

Melinda Knuth, Bridget K. Behe, Charles R. Hall, Patricia T. Huddleston, and R. Thomas Fernandez

urban forest ecosystems, p. 25–46. In: J.E. Kuser (ed.). Urban and community forestry in the northeast. Springer, Dordrecht, The Netherlands Randolph, B. Troy, P. 2008 Attitudes to conservation and water consumption Environ. Sci. Policy 11 5 441 455