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Brent Tisserat and Amy Stuff

The effects of aqueous solutions applied as foliar spray and drench applications of glycerol were tested on the ‘Chantenay’ carrot (Daucus carota L.) family Apiaceae, corn (Zea mays L.) family Poaceae, and spearmint (Mentha spicata L.) family Lamiaceae under greenhouse conditions. Foliar sprays and drenches were administered to carrots at concentrations of 0, 1, 3, 5, 10, 25, or 50 ml·L−1. Fresh weights, dry weights, and taproot diameter from carrot seedlings sprayed with a solution containing 5 mL·L−1 (50 mm) glycerol increased 105.6%, 158.4%, and 53.8%, respectively, when compared with untreated carrots. Foliar sprays were administered to corn at concentrations of 0, 0.1, 0.3, 0.5, and 1 ml·L−1 and spearmint at concentrations of 0, 1, 5, and 10 mL·L−1. Growth responses increased in corn and spearmint by using certain glycerol concentrations. Fresh weights, dry weights, and shoot length from corn seedlings sprayed with a solution containing 0.5 mL·L−1 (5 mm) glycerol increased 83.5%, 154.6%, and 90.9%, respectively, when compared with untreated corn. Fresh weights, dry weights, and shoot length from mint plants sprayed with a solution containing 5 mL·L−1 (50 mm) glycerol increased 46.6%, 68.7%, and 102.5%, respectively, when compared with untreated plants. Glycerol applications can stimulate growth responses in diverse plant species.

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Jennifer K. Boldt and James E. Barrett

A daminozide plus chlormequat chloride tank mix spray was applied to six Coleus cultivars or breeding lines at different times during propagation. For UF 03-8-10 and `Coco Loco', plants sprayed on day 7 or day 10 were shorter than control plants at transplant, but plants sprayed on day 13 were not. Other cultivars did not respond to single applications. Five of the six cultivars responded to application on days 7 and 13. Plants of UF 03-8-3 and `Coco Loco' were significantly shorter than control plants at transplant. Plants of UF 03-8-10, UF 03-6-1, and UF 03-17-8 were shorter than control plants at 3 weeks after transplant. `Hurricane Louise' did not respond to the tank mix. A second study found a cultivar specific response to three chemical treatments applied as a spray on day 10 of propagation. At transplant, UF 03-8-10, UF 03-8-3, UF 03-6-1, and `Coco Loco' plants sprayed with the tank mix at 2500 plus 1500 mg·L-1, respectively, were significantly shorter than the control plants. A uniconazole spray at 2 mg·L-1 reduced elongation in UF 03-8-10, UF 03-8-3, and UF 03-6-1, compared to control plants. Ethephon at 250 mg·L-1 reduced elongation in UF 03-8-10, UF 03-8-3, and `Coco Loco' plants. None of the chemical sprays reduced elongation in `Hurricane Louise' at the concentrations applied. Ethephon increased axillary branching in all cultivars, and induced lower leaf abscission in UF 03-17-8 and `Hurricane Louise'; leaf malformation in UF 03-6-1 and `Coco Loco'; and color alteration in UF 03-6-1, UF 03-8-3, and `Coco Loco'.

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Neil O. Anderson and Natalie J. Walker

methods of color alteration? How does the marketing of these flowers differ from classic offerings? All of these questions pose a concern for use of genetically modified carnations in the retail floral setting. Testing GMO Carnation in Hort 1013. Students

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Jorge M. Fonseca, Hyun-Jin Kim, Wesley L. Kline, Christian A. Wyenandt, Murshidul Hoque, Husein Ajwa, and Ned French

resistance of fresh-cut lettuce to color alteration upon storage; and 2) not all factors or elicitors that enhance phenolics decrease quality of fresh-cut product resulting from oxidation and triggers increased activity of PPO, should be considered further