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Cecil T. Pounders and G. Sam Foster

A statistical model was used to partition the effects of age group, cutting position within the plant crown, and ramet environment on propagule development from stem cuttings collected from random stock plants of Ilex ×attenuata Ashe `Foster #2' (`Foster' holly). Most of the intra-clonal variation observed originated from sources not partitioned by the model. Small differences in growth were associated with sampling position within the crown. Repropagation gave no indication that factors measured by the model could be passed from ramet to propagule. Within-clone variation was not reduced by repropagation or by hedging propagules to force new growth.

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Susana Boso Alonso, Virginia Alonso-Villaverde Pilar Gago, José L. Santiago, Mariá C. Martínez, and Emilio Rodriguez

Agricultura Pesca y Alimentación, 1988 ) led to an increasing demand for ‘Albariño’ grapes and to the substitution of low-quality cultivars and the hybrids they produced (then typical of post-Phylloxera Galicia) by ‘Albariño’. Because no clonal selection had

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Cecil T. Pounders and G. Sam Foster

Analysis of clonal variation for two rooting traits of western hemlock [Tsuga heteterophylla (Raf.) Sarg.] clones indicated that realized genetic gain would be improved by more effective partitioning and reduction of environmental differences associated with clones. Interactions between clones and multiple propagation dates were significant, but clone rank changes between dates were minor. Number of meted cuttings per plot (RC) and number of main roots per cutting (MR) were more highly correlated genetically (1.06) than phenotypically (0.36). Broad-sense heritabilitiesHx 2 = 0.62 and Hx 2 = 0.79 for RC and MR, respectively) and predicted genetic gain from clonal selection were moderately high. Both the percentage of rooted cuttings and root system quality could be rapidly improved by the clonal selection procedures used.

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Kai-Ge Zhao, Ming-Qin Zhou, Long-Qing Chen, Donglin Zhang, and Gituru Wahiti Robert

. Materials and Methods Plant materials and DNA extraction. A total of 72 wintersweet clones ( Table 1 ) were collected in this study. (In this paper, cultivars and genotypes are represented as “clones” because all accessions were propagated

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Todd A. Burnes, Robert A. Blanchette, Jason A. Smith, and James J. Luby

Ribes genotypes ( Lanham et al., 2000 ). This technology is useful for verifying accuracy of clones and resistant genotypes. During a previous study (Burnes et al., unpublished data), it was determined that plants being sold as R. nigrum ‘Consort

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T. Ball, J. Smeenk, and K.C. Sink

Outstanding asparagus crowns were identified in established Michigan asparagus fields, MSU germplasm, variety trials, or were provided by commercial sources. The single-crown selections were micropropagated to provide cloned plants for the trials. Field trials consisting of four replications of 12 plants each were established at two locations. Crowns were planted 8 inches deep and spaced 18 inches apart in rows 4.5 or 5 feet apart. Five, 37, and 25 selections were planted in 1998, 1989, and 1991, respectively. Plots were not harvested until 2 years after planting, when they had partial harvests of six pickings. In the third and following years, plots received full harvests of 20 to 25 pickings. In the third full harvest at the Hart location, clones Hart-2 and Hart-3 yielded 6989 and 6875 lb/A, respectively, and were significantly more productive than Syn4-56, which had 3720 lb/A. At Benton Harbor, Hart-4 produced 4184 lb/A, significantly higher than the Syn4-56 yield of 3088 lb/A at that location. These significant differences were not observed until the second full harvest.

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Hrvoje Rukavina and Harrison G. Hughes

, and burning treatment on flowering spike production in five saltgrass clones from three cold-hardiness zones. Materials and methods Five saltgrass clones originating from three different cold-hardiness zones were evaluated over 2 years ( Table 1 ). In

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Qingrong Sun, Meijuan Sun, Hongyan Sun, Richard L. Bell, Linguang Li, Wei Zhang, and Jihan Tao

apple rootstocks varied ( Bahmani et al., 2012 ; Briand and Hicks, 1989 ; Sharma et al., 2007 ; Yassen et al., 2009 ). In the present study, the shoot regeneration response and rooting capacity among six new clonal apple rootstock cultivars, GM256, 71

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Andrew R. King, Michael A. Arnold, Douglas F. Welsh, and W. Todd Watson

contacts the foliage ( Arnold, 2008 ; Denny, 2007 ; Dirr, 2009 ). Denny (2007) conducted provenance screenings for tolerance to these stresses and recommended that studies be conducted on asexual propagation by cuttings of subsequent clonal selections

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A.J. Daymond, P. Hadley, R.C.R. Machado, and E. Ng

Biomass partitioning of cacao (Theobroma cacao L.) was studied in seven clones and five hybrids in a replicated experiment in Bahia, Brazil. Over an 18-month period, a 7-fold difference in dry bean yield was demonstrated between genotypes, ranging from the equivalent of 200 to 1389 kg·ha-1. During the same interval, the increase in trunk cross-sectional area ranged from 11.1 cm2 for clone EEG-29 to 27.6 cm2 for hybrid PA-150 × MA-15. Yield efficiency increment (the ratio of cumulative yield to the increase in trunk circumference), which indicated partitioning between the vegetative and reproductive components, ranged from 0.008 kg·cm-2 for clone CP-82 to 0.08 kg·cm-2 for clone EEG-29. An examination of biomass partitioning within the pod of the seven clones revealed that the beans accounted for between 32.0% (CP-82) and 44.5% (ICS-9) of the pod biomass. The study demonstrated the potential for yield improvement in cacao by selectively breeding for more efficient partitioning to the yield component.