Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 282 items for :

  • "citrus fruit" x
  • Refine by Access: All x
Clear All
Free access

Jian Xin Shi, Joseph Riov, Raphael Goren, Eliezer E. Goldschmidt, and Ron Porat

( Tesniere and Verries, 2000 ) or ADH in strawberry ( Fragaria × ananassa Duch.) ( Moyano et al., 2004 ) is quite different when considered at the isogene level. Citrus fruit are generally classified as nonclimacteric, although immature citrus fruit

Free access

Xiuxiu Sun, Elizabeth Baldwin, Mark Ritenour, Anne Plotto, and Jinhe Bai

fruit peel color ( Hall, 2013 ). In Florida, such treatments are only allowed on oranges, temples, tangelos, and K-Early citrus fruit (Florida Dept. of Citrus, 2014). While approved as safe in the United States, CR2, has been listed by the IARC and EU as

Open access

G. Felsenstein and D. Nahir

Abstract

An instrument for in-the-field testing of citrus fruit firmness has been developed and tested. Linear deformation of a fruit along its diameter under the pressure of a constant force was found a good criterion of weight loss, and hence firmness of citrus.

Free access

Robert D. Hagenmaier and Robert A. Baker

The shrinkage rate of `Marsh' grapefruit (Citrus paradisi Macf.), `Ambersweet' hybrid [(C. reticulata Blanco × C. paradisi Macf. × C. reticulata) × C. sinensis (L.) Osb.] and `Valencia' oranges [C. sinensis (L.) Osb.] was increased 50 % to 150% by washing the fruit with rotary brushes, but was not changed by hand-washing the fruit with cellulose sponges. Internal CO2 increased using both washing methods. Waxed fruit obtained from five Florida packinghouses and cleaned with rotary brushes and waxed had shrinkage rates the same as those of nonwashed controls. Thus, controlling the washing process is important to minimize shrinkage of fresh citrus fruit.

Open access

Yoram Fuchs and Alexander Cohen

Abstract

The effects of ethrel on the color, respiration, ethylene evolution and internal quality of citrus fruit were studied. Concentrations between 100 and 5000 ppm were tested and compared to 50 ppm ethylene treatment. Fruit treated with 1000 ppm ethrel reached a satisfactory color 7 days after treatment at 17°C. Respiration and ethylene evolution levels were higher in ethrel and ethylene treated lemons than in the controls. Five thousand ppm ethrel caused rind injuries to lemons and delayed the degreening of Clementine and Shamouti oranges. Ethrel efficiency was found to be temperature dependent. Waxing the fruit delays the degreening processes. Ethrel induced eifects similar to those of ethylene.

Open access

Tom W. Embleton, Winston W. Jones, and Robert G. Platt

Abstract

The effects of plant nutrients on citrus fruit quality cannot be considered independently of their effects on yield. In some cases quality can be improved by sacrificing some yield;however, from the overall economic point of view, it is usually advantageous to sustain maximum fruit yield even though there may be some sacrifice in fruit quality. This report emphasizes the nutrient effects on quality in the ranges in which we expect maximum yield to be sustained. If the deficient ranges for yield are included, the degree of effects on quality is greater. The nutrient ranges and effects discussed are primarily those encountered by the authors under California conditions.

Open access

Albert C. Purvis, G. Eldon Brown, and Robert D. Carter

Abstract

Freeze-damaged ‘Marsh’ grapefruit (Citrus paradisi Macf.) and ‘Pineapple’ orange [Citrus sinensis (L.) Osbeck] fruit were sealed in polyethylene shrink film and stored for 6 weeks at 15°C in an attempt to prevent segment dehydration. Although the film greatly restricted water loss from the fruit, segment dehydration was similar to that observed for waxed fruit. During dehydration of freeze-damaged segments of ‘Valencia’ orange fruit, the relative water content of the adjacent mesocarp tissue increased. However, no differences were found in the soluble carbohydrate levels in mesocarp tissue adjacent to damaged and undamaged segments. The results indicate that the mesocarp tissue is not only in the pathway of water loss from free-damaged citrus fruit, but also accumulates water from damaged tissues. Furthermore, segment tissue membranes and walls appear to be differentially permeable to sugars and water.

Free access

Fernando Alferez, Shila Singh, Igor Kostenyuk, and Jacqueline Burns

Abscission is a natural plant process that culminates in the removal of organs from the parent plant. Control of abscission remains an important goal of agriculture, but events that initiate and transduce abscission signals have not been well defined. An understanding of these events may reveal pathways that can be targeted to control abscission. The compound 5-chloro-3-methyl-4-nitro-1H-pyrazole (CMNP) is a pyrazole-derivative that induces abscission selectively in mature citrus (Citrus sinensis) fruit when applied to the canopy. Peel contact is essential for efficacy. Previous work identified CMNP as an uncoupler. Timing of CMNP-induced events in citrus flavedo indicated that increased reactive oxygen species and electrolyte leakage occurred within 30 minutes and 2 hours after application, whereas reduced ATP content was measured 3 hours after application. Phospholipase A2 (PLA2) and lipoxygenase (LOX) activities, and lipid hydroperoxide (LPO) levels increased in flavedo of citrus fruit peel treated with CMNP, indicating that the lipid signaling pathway was activated. A specific inhibitor of PLA2 activity, aristolochic acid (AT), reduced CMNP-induced increases in PLA2 and LOX activities and LPO levels in citrus flavedo and greatly reduced abscission, suggesting that production of phospholipid-derived signals influence abscission process. However, AT treatment failed to halt the reduction in ATP content, indicating that reduction in ATP preceded the increase in PLA2 activity and the biological response. The results demonstrate a link between lipid signaling and abscission in citrus.

Free access

Peter D. Petracek, D. Frank Kelsey, and Craig Davis

The effect of high-pressure washing (HPW) on the surface morphology and physiology of citrus fruit was examined. Mature white (Citrus paradisi Macf. `Marsh') and red (Citrus paradisi Macf. `Ruby Red') grapefruit, oranges (Citrus sinensis L. `Hamlin'), and tangelos (Citrus reticulata Blanco × Citrus paradisi Macf. `Orlando') were washed on a roller brush bed and under a water spraying system for which water pressure was varied. Washing white grapefruit and oranges for 10 seconds under conventional low water pressure (345 kPa at cone nozzle) had little effect on peel wax fine structure. Washing fruit for 10 seconds under high water pressure (1380 or 2760 kPa at veejet nozzle) removed most epicuticular wax platelets from the surface as well as other surface debris such as sand grains. Despite the removal of epicuticular wax, HPW did not affect whole fruit mass loss or exchange of water, O2, or CO2 at the midsection of the fruit. Analysis of the effect of nozzle pressure (345, 1380, or 2760 kPa), period of exposure (10 or 60 seconds), and wax application on internal gas concentrations 18 hours after washing showed that increasing nozzle pressure increased internal CO2 concentrations while waxing increased internal ethylene and CO2 concentrations and decreased O2 concentrations. An apparent wound ethylene response was often elicited from fruit washed under high pressures (≥2070 kPa) or for long exposure times (≥30 seconds).

Free access

T-B Huang, R.L. Darnell, and K.E. Koch

Water and carbon budgets of individual citrus fruit were determined throughout their growth to quantify the demand for sucrose and water relative to developmental changes. Fruit transpiration, water accumulation, photosynthesis, respiration, and C gain were measured during this period for grapefruit (Citrus paradisii Macf.) and calamondin (Citrus madurensis Lour.). On a whole-fruit basis, estimated rates of grapefruit transpiration and mean daily water inflow decreased after the first third of development, whereas water apparently was lost freely throughout growth of the smaller, thin-peeled calamondins. Estimates of daily fruit C import remained relatively similar during the majority of grapefruit growth, increasing rapidly only as fruit neared maturation. A similar trend was observed in calamondins, although rates were more variable. Overall, estimated mean daily water inflow into “developing grapefruit decreased relative to that of sucrose inflow, resulting in a progressively higher ratio of sucrose transport to net water inflow. Values for these ratios rose from ≈; 10 to >300 g sucrose/liter of water, reaching levels of net water and sngar transfer that could both be accommodated by citrus phloem alone. Any additional entry into grapefruit appears to have been offset by xylem back-flow, because no other net water influx was observed.