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Engin Ertan, Esra Erdal, Gülsüm Alkan, and Burak E. Algül

Chestnut ( Castanea sativa Mill.) is one of the most important tree nuts in the world. According to the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) Statistical Database, the worldwide chestnut production is 1,998,880 tons. Chestnut fruits are highly

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Umit Serdar, Bulent Kose, and Fatma Yilmaz

We studied the anatomical structure of graft unions in European chestnut using several grafting methods. The work was done in the greenhouse during 2003–04. The grafting methods epicotyl, hypocotyl, and inverted radicle were used. The grafts were made with scions of clone SA 5-1 on clone SE 21-9 rootstock. The samples for examination were taken from the graft unions 2, 6, and 12 months after grafting, and fixed in a formalin–acetic acid–alcohol solution. The observation of the anatomical structure of the graft union area revealed that new cambium, xylem, and phloem tissues were formed in the samples two months after grafting. Further, it could be also observed that 6 months were necessary for continuous cambial connection.

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Ying Wang, Ming Kang, and Hongwen Huang

China where three endemic chestnuts occur: C. mollissima , C. seguinii , and C. henryi ( Lang, 2004 ; Lang and Huang, 1999 ). C. mollissima , C. crenata , and C. sativa are economically important for chestnut nut production. C. mollissima is

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Eiichi Inoue, Lin Ning, Hiromichi Hara, Shuan Ruan, and Hiroyuki Anzai

Chestnut is one of the most important nut trees in the world and has been cultivated for more than 2700 years in Asia ( Adua, 1999 ). Castanea species have a diploid genome (n = 12) and are distributed in the temperate regions. The genus

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Francisco X. Aguilar, Mihaela M. Cernusca, and Michael A. Gold

Edible chestnuts were well known in the United States before their near extinction at the beginning of the 20th century. The accidental introduction of the chestnut blight ( Cryphonectria parasitica ) from Asia in the early 1900s almost eradicated

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Michele R. Warmund, Andrew K. Biggs, and Larry D. Godsey

Chinese chestnut is an attractive niche crop in the United States because of its potential for high yields and ease of production, resulting in substantial economic returns ( Gold et al., 2006 ; Warmund, 2011 ). In a survey conducted in 2006, most

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Takuya Tetsumura and Kensuke Yamashita

Institute for providing japanese chestnut nuts.

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Michele R. Warmund

Dryocosmus kuriphilus is a cynipid wasp that adversely affects chestnut tree growth and nut production in Asia, Europe, and North America ( Panzavolta et al., 2011 ; Payne et al., 1975 ; Tamura, 1960 ; Warmund, 2009 ). Adult female wasps

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Michele R. Warmund

Although early poetry from 1000 to 500 B.C. chronicles Chinese chestnut as an economic crop in northern China, it was introduced into the United States in 1853 ( Keng, 1974 ; McKay and Berry, 1960 ). Early interest in this species was for timber

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Santiago Pereira-Lorenzo, Ana M. Ramos-Cabrer, Belén Díaz-Hernández, Javier Ascasíbar-Errasti, Federico Sau, and Marta Ciordia-Ara

Chestnut (Castanea sativa Mill.) is an important crop in Spain. This inventory of chestnut cultivars complements previous studies. We have located 152 chestnut cultivars in 131 municipalities covering 108.6 ha, with 72 new cultivars in addition to the 80 previously found. Fewer than 50% of these cultivars are extensively cultivated. Chestnuts in Spain are grown from sea level to 1100 m, but are more frequent between 200 and 800 m on northern-facing slopes. Most of the chestnuts are harvested from 25 Oct. to 10 Nov.