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Claire H. Luby, Rachael Vernon, Hiroshi A. Maeda and Irwin L. Goldman

). Carrots ( Daucus carota L. var. sativa ), well known for high concentrations of provitamin A carotenoids, also contain vitamin E. Koch and Goldman (2005) and Luby et al. (2014) have reported several tocochromanols in carrot, including α-, β- and γ

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Djamila Rekika, Katrine A. Stewart, Guy Boivin and Sylvie Jenni

The carrot weevil, Listronotus oregonensis (Le conte), is the most significant pest of carrot ( Daucus carota L.) crops in Quebec, where more than 40% of the crop may be damaged if the weevil is left uncontrolled ( Zhao et al., 1991 ). Carrots

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María S. Alessandro and Claudio R. Galmarini

In almost all crop species we know as biennials, early flowering or annual plants are usually found. These crops include carrot, beet [ Beta vulgaris L. var. crassa (Alef) J.Helm], sugar beet ( Beta vulgaris L. var. saccharifera Alef

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Melissa Bonham, Gerald M. Ghidiu, Erin Hitchner and Elwood L. Rossell

The carrot weevil is the most economically important insect pest of carrot in the northeastern United States ( Simonet and Davenport, 1981 ). In New Jersey, adults overwinter in and near hedgerows and fields where carrots were grown the previous

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Lynn Brandenberger, William McGlynn, Lynda Wells, Bruce Bostian and Mark Payton

Carrot is a cool-season vegetable belonging to the Apiaceae . It probably originated in the Middle East, with the first carrots grown for consumption in Afghanistan ( Peirce, 1987 ). Carrots are a substantial source of dietary fiber and vitamin A

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Milton E. McGiffen Jr. and Edmund J. Ogbuchiekwe

Farms for donation of land and materials, and Susana Aparicio for manuscript preparation. Research was funded by a grant from the California Fresh Carrot Advisory Board. The cost of publishing this paper was defrayed in part by the payment of page

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Edmund J. Ogbuchiekwe, Milton E. McGiffen Jr., Joe Nunez and Steven A. Fennimore

Alisal St., Salinas, CA 93905. Our research was funded by grants from the California Fresh Carrot Advisory Board and the USDA. Susana Aparicio, John Masiunas, and Thomas Lanini reviewed an earlier draft of this manuscript.

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Charles E. Christianson, Stephen S. Jones and Lindsey J. du Toit

In 2013, carrot ( Daucus carota ) root crops were grown on greater than 29,000 ha in the United States at a value of $655 million [ U.S. Department of Agriculture National (USDA) Agricultural National Statistics Service, 2014 ]. In addition, carrot

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Daniel C. Brainard and D. Corey Noyes

Management practices that build soil organic matter (SOM) are valuable for improving soil water-holding capacity, nutrient retention, aeration, and infiltration rates ( Magdoff and van Es, 2000 ) . For carrots ( Daucus carota subsp. sativa), these

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E. Gordon Kruse, James E. Ells and Ann E. McSay

A 3-year irrigation scheduling study on carrots (Daucus carota L.) was conducted at the Colorado State Univ. Horticulture Research Center near Fort Collins to determine the irrigation schedule that produced the best combination of high water use efficiency and marketable yields with the least amount of water and fewest irrigations. This study used an irrigation scheduling program developed by the U.S. Department of Agriculture/Agricultural Research Service with crop coefficients calculated for carrots. Maximum carrot production and water use efficiency were obtained when the scheduling program simulated a 30-cm rooting depth at planting, increasing linearly to 60 cm in 75 days. Best yields and water use efficiency were attained by irrigating whenever 40% of the available water in the root zone had been depleted. The computer program for irrigation scheduling is available on diskette from the authors.