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J.L. Bi, N.C. Toscano, and G.R. Ballmer

The efficacy of two novel chloronicotinyls and two novel insect growth regulators against the greenhouse whitefly [Trialeurodes vaporariorum (Westwood)] on summer-planted strawberries was evaluated in field experiments. Imidacloprid applied in soil 3 weeks after planting decreased whitefly adult numbers by 58% to 90%, first and second instars by 78% to 93% up to 56 days postapplication, and third and fourth instars by 42% to 86% up to 77 days postapplication, whereas thiamethoxam applied similarly reduced adults by 58% to 80%, first and second instars by 78% to 93% up to 6 weeks posttreatment, and third and fourth instars by 48% to 80% up to 10 weeks after initial application, compared to nontreated controls. Imidacloprid applied in soil immediately prior to planting further suppressed numbers of whiteflies by 71% to 83% (adults), 58% to 74% (first and second instars), and 52% to 74% (third and fourth instars), in comparison with the same compound applied through drip irrigation lines 4 weeks after planting. Buprofezin and pyriproxifen applied 6 weeks after planting reduced numbers of adult whiteflies by 25% to 81% and 40% to 73%, respectively; first and second instars by 61% to 92% and 51% to 100%, respectively; and third and fourth instars by 45% to 100% and 37% to 87%, respectively, on most sampling dates up to 7 weeks postapplication. The potential roles of these insecticides in integrated greenhouse whitefly management programs are discussed.

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Raymond A. Cloyd

Greenhouse trials were conducted in 2000-2001 to evaluate the indirect effects of insect growth regulators, whether stimulatory or inhibitory, on the egg production of female citrus mealybug [Planococcus citri (Risso)]. Green coleus [Solenostemon scutellarioides (L.) Codd] were infested with 10 late third instar female citrus mealybugs. The insect growth regulators kinoprene, pyriproxyfen, azadirachtin, buprofezin, and novaluron were applied to infested plants at both the high and low manufacturer recommended rates. Beginning two days after treatments were applied, plants were monitored daily to determine when female mealybugs began to oviposit. Individual mealybugs were removed from plants, placed into glass vials containing 70% isopropyl alcohol when female mealybugs started to oviposit, and dissected to determine the number of eggs. Overall, there were no consistent patterns to suggest that the insect growth regulators and different rates tested had any effect on the egg production of citrus mealybug females. Although, in one instance, the insect growth regulators kinoprene and pyriproxyfen actually lowered citrus mealybug egg production. In addition, the insect growth regulator buprofezin numerically increased female citrus mealybug egg production.

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J.L. Bi and N.C. Toscano

were ≈40 plants in each plot. Insecticide concentrations and applications. Efficacy of spiromesifen against the greenhouse whitefly was evaluated using applications of buprofezin and pyriproxyfen as comparisons. Buprofezin (Applaud 70 WP) was

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Diana Carolina Núñez-López, Augusto Ramírez-Godoy, and Hermann Restrepo-Díaz

et al., 2005 ; Cardona et al., 1993 ). Regarding insecticide treatments, the active ingredients used in the three experiments were: imidacloprid (Confidor ® 350 SC; Bayer) at 0.10 L a.i. per ha, buprofezin (Oportune ® 25 SC; Bayer) at 0.15 L a

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Susan C. Miyasaka and Randall T. Hamasaki

., Walnut Creek, CA) and buprofezin (Applaud; Nichino America, Wilmington, DE) were applied according to the label on 19 Aug. 2015 and 10 Sept. 2015, respectively. Pruning and growth measurements at Lalamilo. On 13 Sept. 2012, protective shadecloth cages

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Raymond A. Cloyd

-, three-, and four-way combinations did not negatively affect the ability of spinosad to control western flower thrips ( Warnock and Cloyd, 2005 ). Another study evaluated the effect of tank mixing the insecticides and miticides buprofezin (Talus®; SePro

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Peter Alem, Paul A. Thomas, and Marc W. van Iersel

after transplanting, plants were sprayed with buprofezin (Talus ® 40SC, SePRO Corporation, Carmel, IN) and drenched with a mixture of imidacloprid (Marathon 60 Wettable Powder; OHP, Mainland, PA) and dinotefuran (Safari 20 SG; Valent USA Corporation

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Jacob C. Domenghini, Dale J. Bremer, Jack D. Fry, and Gregory L. Davis

, R=H) and (spinosyn D, R=CH 3 )] at 0.2 kg a.i./ha on 12 Jan. 2010; bifenazate {hydrazine carboxylic acid, 2-[4-methoxy-(1,1-biphenyl)-3-yl] 1-methylethyl ester} at 0.06 kg a.i./ha on 2 Feb. 2010 and 10 Sept. 2010; buprofezin (2-tert-butylimino-3

Open access

Joara Secchi Candian, Timothy Coolong, Bhabesh Dutta, Rajagopalbabu Srinivasan, Alton Sparks, Apurba Barman, and Andre Luiz Biscaia Ribeiro da Silva

). Furthermore, sweetpotato whitefly resistance to insecticides has been reported for more than 60 active ingredients ( Mota-Sanchez and Wise, 2019 ), including organophosphates, carbamates, pyrethroids, insect growth regulators, pyriproxyfen, buprofezin