Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 29 items for :

  • "bud removal" x
  • Refine by Access: All x
Clear All
Free access

Daiichiro Miyajima

The increase in the capitula of zinnia plants (Zinnia violacea Cav.) was investigated by analyzing the production of shoots. The effects of removing the buds for capitula and application of BA on the production of shoots were also evaluated. It took ≈40 to 50 days from the emergence of axillary buds to the opening of the capitula at the apices of the shoots from these axillary buds. The application of BA shortened the number of days for the same process. The difference in the number of days from emergence of the axillary buds to that of the first descendant axillary buds was ≈25. The total number of capitula opened was greater in plants with the bud removal treatment than in intact plants. Chemical name used: (N-phenylmethyl)-1H-purine-6-amine (BA).

Free access

Jeffrey G. Williamson and D. Scott NeSmith

is undesirable for bearing blueberry plants, the possibility that flower bud removal could be facilitated in nonbearing blueberries during establishment using hydrogen cyanamide arose. The objectives of this research were to determine the effects of

Free access

Jenny Heringer Vires, Robert Anderson, and Robert Geneve

Purple Coneflower [Echinacea sp. (Asteracea)] is of great value to the horticultural, pharmaceutical, and herbal industry. More research is needed to determine cultural practices that will produce a plant high in biomass and phenolic content, the chemical used for testing the quality of the harvested plant on a percent basis of roots, flowers and vegetative parts. The objective of this experiment is to determine if biomass and phenolic content of Echinacea purpurea and E. purpurea `Magnus' is influenced by fertilization after flower bud removal and vegetative pruning. The second objective of this study is to form an evaluation of the differences in biomass and phenolic content of five cultivars of E. purpurea and five species of Echinacea. Biomass and phenolic content will be evaluated to determine if exposing these plants to various treatments increases the quality of the plant over 1 and 2 years of growth. Differences in dry weights of Echinacea species and cultivars harvested after the first year of growth was determined. There was a significant difference in total dry weight between E. purpurea cultivars. Echinacea purpurea `Bright Star' and `Clio' significantly produced the most total dry weight compared to all other cultivars. There was no significant difference in root or flower biomass between cultivars. Biomass of Echinacea species was significantly different in root, vegetaive and flower parts. The total biomass of E. purpurea and E. tennesseensis was significantly higher compared to other species. Echinacea pallida and E. paradoxa were not significantly different from E. purpurea in root biomass, even though both species were small in above ground growth. Echinacea tennesseensis significantly produced 45% to 105% more flowers compared to other species. Differences in phenolic content between species and cultivars will also be presented.

Free access

Don C. Elfving and Dwayne B. Visser

et al., 1998 ; Ouellette et al., 1996 ). Bud removal (disbudding) can affect and may improve shoot growth in apple and other tree fruit species ( Mika et al., 1983 ; Peano et al., 2005 ), and may show promise for shoot growth stimulation in sweet

Free access

Patrick Conner

Pecan is a highly heterozygous outcrossing species that is normally propagated by grafting or budding onto seedling rootstocks. The four-flap or banana graft is commonly used by growers or researchers because of its high percentage of success, especially when employed by novice grafters. We removed scion buds before grafting in an attempt to delay budbreak, thus providing more time for vascular connections to form before leaf development and its associated demand for water takes place. Removal of buds from the scion wood was successful in delaying bud and leaf development, but did not increase graft success, and in one treatment actually lowered graft success.

Free access

Patrick J. Connor

Pecan is a highly heterozygous outcrossing species which is normally propagated by grafting or budding onto seedling rootstocks. The four-flap or banana graft is commonly used by growers or researches because of its high percentage of success, especially when employed by novice grafters. We removed scion buds before grafting in an attempt to delay budbreak, thus providing more time for vascular connections to form before leaf development and its associated demand for water takes place. Removal of buds from the scion wood was successful in delaying bud and leaf development, but did not increase graft success, and in one treatment actually lowered graft success.

Full access

Todd C. Einhorn, Debra Laraway, and Janet Turner

were adjusted by removing reproductive buds by hand in early spring when bud development was about stage 1 (first swelling). Half of the reproductive buds per spur were removed for T1, and all but one for T2. Bud removal was performed on all spurs of

Free access

B.E. Maust, J.G. Williamson, and R.L. Darnell

Floral budbreak and fruit set in many southern highbush blueberry (SHB) cultivars (hybrids of Vaccinium corymbosum L. with other species of Vaccinium) begin prior to vegetative budbreak. Experiments were conducted with two SHB cultivars, `Misty' and `Sharpblue', to test the hypothesis that initial flower bud density (flower buds/m cane length) affects vegetative budbreak and shoot development, which in turn affect fruit development. Flower bud density of field-grown plants was adjusted in two nonconsecutive years by removing none, one-third, or two-thirds of the flower buds during dormancy. Vegetative budbreak, new shoot dry weight, leaf area, and leaf area: fruit ratios decreased with increasing flower bud density in both cultivars. Average fruit fresh weight and fruit soluble solids decreased in both cultivars, and fruit ripening was delayed in `Misty' as leaf area: fruit ratios decreased. This study indicates that because of the inverse relationship between flower bud density and canopy establishment, decreasing the density of flower buds in SHB will increase fruit size and quality and hasten ripening.

Free access

Juliet Mann and Bernadine C. Strik

Mature `Kotata' and `Marion' trailing blackberry plants were studied in 1994. In `Kotata', canes were subjected to 0%, 25%, 50%, 75%, or 100% primary bud removal in Feb. 1994. In `Marion' 0, 55, or 100 primary buds were removed per dm2 from fruiting sections (panels). Primary bud removal did not subsequently affect yield per cane or per dm2 in either cultivar. Yield compensation occurred through production of secondary laterals, which were as fruitful as primary laterals.