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Bridget K. Behe, Patricia T. Huddleston, Charles R. Hall, Hayk Khachatryan, and Benjamin Campbell

and brand in combination ( Behe et al., 2016 ; Collart et al., 2010 ). Prior research suggests that brand recognition positively influences purchase behavior ( Hoyer and Brown, 1990 ). Recognition of a brand, or anything else, can be defined as a mode

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Bridget K. Behe, Patricia Huddleston, and Lynnell Sage

; Olson and Jacoby, 1972 ). Studies suggest that brand recognition influences purchase behavior ( Hoyer and Brown, 1990 ), with recognition of a brand or anything else defined as a mode of attention or “identifying something by its kind (name) and in view

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Alba J. Collart, Marco A. Palma, and Charles R. Hall

The environmental horticulture industry, also known as the Green Industry, is the second most important sector in the U.S. agricultural economy in terms of economic output and one of the fastest growing segments of agriculture; however, it has shifted from an average annual growth of 13.6% in the 1970s to an annual growth of less than 3% in the 2000s, which suggests the industry is facing a maturing marketplace. As an effort to help the industry stimulate demand, Texas A&M AgriLife developed the Texas Superstar™ and Earth-Kind™ brands. The aims of these plant promotion programs are to increase the demand for selected horticultural products, raise awareness among consumers of Texas-grown plant material, promote environmental responsibility, and increase producers' profitability by providing branding price premiums. Despite the considerable investments on research and marketing done thus far, no research has investigated the effectiveness of these branding efforts in terms of consumer behavior. This article evaluates brand awareness and willingness-to-pay for these two brands in Texas. The discrete choice models used were the Logit and Probit models on brand awareness and the Tobit model on the conditional willingness-to-pay. Results from this study show that consumer awareness of Texas Superstar™ and Earth-Kind™ in Texas is low, but the level of satisfaction among consumers is high. Furthermore, profiles of the consumers' behavioral and demographic characteristics that are more likely to influence brand awareness and willingness-to-pay were identified. The findings suggest that consumers who shop weekly or monthly for ornamental plants are more likely to be aware of programs such as Texas Superstar™ and Earth-Kind™. Also, those who live in South Texas were more likely to exhibit awareness of Earth-Kind™. Consumers who shopped for self-consumption purposes were willing to pay a discounted price for Texas Superstar™ and Earth-Kind™ plants compared with unbranded plants and those who were previously aware of the brands were willing to pay more. The two brands were effective in differentiating their products and thus creating price premiums. It was estimated that the willingness-to-pay for Earth-Kind™ and Texas Superstar™ for the average respondent was 10% higher than the willingness-to-pay for an unbranded plant.

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Robert G. Nelson, Benjamin L. Campbell, Robert C. Ebel, and William A. Dozier Jr.

brand the product. Brand needs. Successful brands have very high levels of awareness among consumers. They achieve this partly with aggressive and persistent promotion. For example, Sunkist has a phenomenal 97% brand recognition ( Western Farm

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Julie Campbell, Alicia Rihn, and Hayk Khachatryan

value-added attributes may or may not be offered in other fertilizer options. As firms position themselves in the marketplace, there is constant competition to maintain brand recognition while meeting changing consumer needs. Firms and policymakers

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Julie H. Campbell and Benjamin L. Campbell

service quality attributes in six U.S. states HortScience 18 71 78 Behe, B.K. Huddleston, P. Sage, L. 2016 Age cohort influences brand recognition, awareness, and likelihood to buy vegetable and herb transplants HortScience 51 145 151 Campbell, B. Brewer

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Bridget K. Behe, Melinda Knuth, Charles R. Hall, Patricia T. Huddleston, and R. Thomas Fernandez

and sustainable plant production characteristics HortScience 48 209 215 Behe, B.K. Huddleston, P.T. Sage, L. 2016 Age cohort influences brand recognition, awareness, and likelihood to buy vegetables and herb transplants HortScience 51 145 151

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Melinda Knuth, Bridget K. Behe, Charles R. Hall, Patricia T. Huddleston, and R. Thomas Fernandez

.K. Huddleston, P.T. Sage, L. 2016 Age cohort influences brand recognition, awareness, and likelihood to buy vegetable and herb transplants HortScience 51 145 151 Behe, B. Knuth, M. Hall, C.R. Huddleston, P.T. Fernandez, R.T. 2018 Consumer involvement with and

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Lucy K. Bradley, Bridget K. Behe, Natalie R. Bumgarner, Charlotte D. Glen, Joseph L. Donaldson, Ellen M. Bauske, Sheri Dorn, and Gail Langellotto

Comparison of gardening activities and purchases of homeowners and renters J. Environ. Hort. 24 4 217 220 Behe, B.K. Huddleston, P.T. Sage, L. 2016 Age cohort influences brand recognition, awareness, and likelihood to buy vegetable and herb transplants

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Melinda Knuth, Bridget K. Behe, Charles R. Hall, Patricia Huddleston, and R. Thomas Fernandez

a Landscape plant material, size, and design sophistication increase perceived home value J. Environ. Hort. 23 3 127 133 Behe, B.K. Huddleston, P.T. Sage, L. 2016 Age cohort influences brand recognition, awareness, likelihood to buy vegetable herb