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Todd A. Burnes, Robert A. Blanchette, Jason A. Smith and James J. Luby

selling or planting of certain Ribes species or cultivars, particularly the nonnative European black currant, R . nigrum , that has been found to be extremely susceptible to WPBR ( Barney and Hummer, 2005 ; McKay, 2000 ). One source of immunity to C

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Fumiomi Takeda, Rajeev Arora, Michael E. Wisniewski, Glen A. Davis and Michele R. Warmund

A seasonal study was conducted to assess the freezing injury of `Boskoop Giant' black currant (Ribes nigrum L.) samples from Oct. 1991 through Mar. 1992. Buds were subjected to either differential thermal analysis (DTA) or one of a series of temperatures (0 to -36C). Freeze injury was then assessed either visually or with TTC. Results indicated that black currant floral buds have multiple low-temperature exotherms (LTE). Freeze injury in intact buds could not be visually quantified because of the lack of visible browning, nor assayed with TTC reduction. Excised floral primordia incubated in TTC, however, developed colored formazan following exposure to nonfreezing and sublethal freezing temperatures, but remained colorless when exposed to lethal temperatures. The percentage of floral primordia that were colored and colorless were tabulated and a modified Spearman-Karber equation was used to calculate the temperature at which 50% of floral primordia were killed (T50 The T50 temperature was correlated with the temperature at which the lowest LTE was detected (R2 = 0.62). TTC reduction assay using excised floral bud primordia was a good indicator of viability in frozen blackcurrant buds. Chemical name used: 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC).

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Margie Luffman

The search for appropriate white pine blister rust (WPBR) (Cronartium ribicola J.C. Fischer) resistant germplasm to use in black currant (Ribes nigrum L.) breeding programs began in 1935 in Ottawa. Crosses were made in 1938 and 1939 with three different Ribes L. species and two standard black currant cultivars. The resulting seedlings from these crosses were evaluated for rust resistance. Three promising selections resulted from this program and were named `Coronet', `Crusader' and `Consort'.

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Adam Dale

Black currant (Ribes nigrum L.) plants of eight varieties were grown either through black plastic mulch or in bare soil and with the area between the rows cultivated or sodded with red fescue (Festuca rubra L.). Over 6 years, black plastic mulch increased yields by 26% over no mulch and cultivation between the rows increased yield by 32% compared to sod. The effect of both treatments was additive, cultivation and black plastic increased yield by 68% over grass and no black plastic. Growers are recommended to plant black currants through black plastic and avoid using sod between the rows.

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John Carter and Kim E. Hummer

Black currant (Ribes nigrum L.) cultivars with heavy, light, and no gooseberry mite (Cecidophyopsis grossulariae Collinge) infestation levels (MIL) were tested for cold hardiness by visually determining the bud injury rating (BIR) after laboratory freezing in Jan. 1998. Lightly mite-infested cvs. Blackdown and Risager, usually thought of as less cold hardy than Nordic cultivars, survived -35 °C, while mite-infested buds of the Finnish cv. Brödtorp were injured at -35 °C. Heavily mite-infested buds of the Swedish R. nigrum L. cv. StorKlas from Corvallis, Ore., were injured at -20 °C while lightly infested buds were injured to -25 °C. Noninfested `StorKlas' buds from Pennsylvania and British Columbia survived laboratory freezing to -35 °C. Heavy mite infestation lowered the bud cold hardiness of `Brödtorp' and `StorKlas' by 10 °C, as estimated by a modified Spearman-Karber T50, relative to the hardiness of lightly mite-infested buds of these cultivars. Heavily mite-infested buds contained unusual tissues forming what appeared to be spherical blisters or eruptions, ≈100 μ in diameter. Other tissues in the region of heavy mite infestation appeared to be more turgid than their noninfested counterparts. Abiotic and biotic stresses can have a combined impact on field-grown black currants.

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Fumiomi Takeda, R. Arora, M. Wisniewski and M. Warmund

`Danka' black currant floral buds produce multiple low temperature exotherms (LTEs). However, the absence of visual injury symbtoms in the buds after exposure to subfreezing temperatures make it difficult to assess injury in these buds. A 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC) reduction assay was used to determine whether LTEs corresponded to freezing injury of individual floral primordia or to the entire floral axis. Intact buds were cooled at 3C/n, removed at 3C intervals from -12 to -33C, and thawed on ice for 24 h. Duplicate samples were subjected to differential thermal analysis. Freeze injury Could not be measured with TTC in thawed, intact buds. However, incubation of excised floral primordia in TTC resulted in an all or nothing response. The number of LTES did not correspond to the number of floral primordia killed within a floral bud, but the median LTE did correspond with the temperature at which lethal injury of the whole inflorescence occurred. Therefore, preliminary results indicate that TTC reduction assay of individual floral buds is a fast, reliable technique to assess bud injury.

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R.S. Hunt and G.D. Jensen

For the white pine blister rust disease (WPBR), reports conflict concerning the time of year the pathogen, Cronartium ribicola J.C. Fisch., infects western white pine (Pinus monticola D. Don) and what needle age increments are most susceptible. To determine timing of infection, western white pine seedling were placed under infected currants (Ribes nigrum L.) for 1-week periods from May to November. Needles became spotted and stems cankered after exposure to diseased currants from early summer until leaf drop in November. To determine what foliage age increment was most susceptible, 5-year-old seedlings were placed in a disease garden, and older trees were inoculated in situ. All age increments of pine foliage were susceptible to infection. For young seedlings, all age increments were about equally susceptible, but on some older seedlings and trees, the current year's foliage appeared more resistant than older foliage.

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Attila Hegedűs, Emőke Balogh, Rita Engel, Béla Zoltan Sipos, János Papp, Anna Blázovics and Éva Stefanovits-Bányai

several cultivars of important berry species (strawberry, raspberry, red and black currant) as compared with apple, a more intensively consumed fruit. This study revealed correlations between several redox parameters and provides information relative to

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Omer Hoke, Benjamin Campbell, Mark Brand and Thao Hau

increased consumer demand ( Chaker, 2013 ). Such berries include aronia ( A. mitschurinii ), black currant ( R. nigrum ), bilberry ( Vaccinium myrtillus L.), elderberry ( Sambucus nigra L.), and goji berry ( Lycium barbarum L.). Given the health benefits

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Stanislaw Pluta and Agata Broniarek-Niemiec

Field resistance to white pine blister rust (WPBR) (Cronartium ribicola J. C. Fischer) was investigated on 53 black currant (Ribes nigrum L.) genotypes (cultivars and breeding selections) in 1998 and 1999. Uredia did not form on the black currant `Titania' and 17 advanced selections during field evaluations made at the Experimental Orchard at Dabrowice, near Skierniewice, Poland.