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Amaya Atucha and Greg Litus

Biochar is the carbon-rich solid coproduct of biomass pyrolysis, which has the potential to sequester carbon while improving crop yields and other ecosystem services when used as soil amendments ( Lehmann, 2007b ). It is produced from plant residue

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Samuel J. Dunlop, Marta Camps Arbestain, Peter A. Bishop and Jason J. Wargent

). The use of biochar [charcoal-like material produced by heating biomass in the absence of oxygen (O 2 )] produced from glasshouse crop green waste as a substrate for soilless, hydroponic plant production could provide growers with a cost-effective and

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Karen Mitchell, Elizabeth French, Janna Beckerman, Anjali Iyer-Pascuzzi, Jeff Volenec and Kevin Gibson

Biochar is a carbon-rich product formed through the pyrolysis of organic matter. A meta-analysis of 371 independent studies from 114 published manuscripts determined that the addition of biochar to soils resulted in increased crop yields, soil

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James E. Altland and James C. Locke

Modern pyrolysis systems are used to extract liquid and gas petroleum products from biomass for fuel or other chemical products. Biochar is the charred organic matter that remains after pyrolysis of biomass or manure. Biochar is essentially the same

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Tom A. Street, Richard B. Doyle and Dugald C. Close

Biochar may be an effective management tool for increasing carbon (C) in orchard soils. Biochar is a charcoal-type material manufactured specifically for use as a soil amendment in agriculture. Biochar is created by charring organic matter by

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Ajay Nair and Brandon Carpenter

( Schmilewski, 2008 ). Another alternative product that is being tested is biochar, but its potential impact on medium properties and seedling growth has not been tested and validated extensively. Biochar is the term used for soil amendment made of charred

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Michael R. Evans, Brian E. Jackson, Michael Popp and Sammy Sadaka

Biochar is a term that refers to a black carbon-rich material that is produced from organic matter at temperatures lower than 700 °C in an oxygen-limited atmosphere ( Lehmann and Joseph, 2009 ) and is generally considered to be similar to charcoal

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James E. Altland and James C. Locke

Biochar is the charred organic matter that remains after pyrolysis of biomass or manure. The influence of biochar in mineral soil systems has been studied and reviewed extensively ( Lehmann et al., 2011 ; Spokas et al., 2011 ; Verheijen et al

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Drew C. Zwart and Soo-Hyung Kim

( Agostini et al., 2003 ; Elliott and Edmonds, 2008 ; Percival and Noviss, 2010 ). Recently, Elad et al. (2010) showed that incorporation of biochar into potting mix of pepper ( Capsicum annuum cv. Maccabi) and tomato ( Lycopersicum esculentum cv. 1402

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Nathan Shoaf, Lori Hoagland and Daniel S. Egel

. Recently biochar has been suggested as an alternative disease management option ( Elad et al., 2011 ; Jaiswal et al., 2014 ; Kammann and Graber, 2015 ; Lehmann et al., 2011 ). Biochar is a highly stable, carbon-rich product derived from pyrolysis, a