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Phillip D. Griffiths

, and Cornell 606 were selected after an initial cross between red kidney bean cultivar Redkote (Cornell University, Geneva, NY) and Cornell snap bean breeding line 6603. Line 6603 was developed from a cross between snap bean breeding lines 5223 and 5813

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Phillip D. Griffiths, Eric Sandsted, and Donald Halseth

, NY, 2010. Table 3. Field-testing of black bean breeding lines ‘Cornell 609’ and ‘Cornell 610’ in Livingston County, NY, and Tompkins County, NY, 2010. Table 4. Field-testing of light red kidney breeding lines ‘Cornell 611’ and ‘Cornell 612’ in

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David W. Davis and Karl J. Sauter

Attention has been given in recent literature to crop breeding for heat tolerance, but, as with certain other physiological traits, such as photosynthetic efficiency, practical gain has lagged. The question remains as to whether heat tolerance can be improved, and, if so, if it can most efficiently be improved by a holistic approach, as in breeding for yield following timely high temperature levels in the field environment, or whether the breeding for heat (and drought) tolerance components in the laboratory would be feasible. At issue is the identification and repeatability of key plant responses, such as cell membrane damage, heat shock protein formation, increased ethylene output and other responses, and the relevance, effectiveness and cost of screening for such traits. Results from our laboratory, and the work of others, will be reviewed.

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David W. Davis and Karl J. Sauter

Attention has been given in recent literature to crop breeding for heat tolerance, but, as with certain other physiological traits, such as photosynthetic efficiency, practical gain has lagged. The question remains as to whether heat tolerance can be improved, and, if so, if it can most efficiently be improved by a holistic approach, as in breeding for yield following timely high temperature levels in the field environment, or whether the breeding for heat (and drought) tolerance components in the laboratory would be feasible. At issue is the identification and repeatability of key plant responses, such as cell membrane damage, heat shock protein formation, increased ethylene output and other responses, and the relevance, effectiveness and cost of screening for such traits. Results from our laboratory, and the work of others, will be reviewed.

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B. Scully, R. Provvidenti, D. Benscher, D.E. Halseth, J.C. Miller Jr., and D.H. Wallace

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Phillip Griffiths, Molly Jahn, and Mike Dickson

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Charles A. Mullins, R. Allen Straw, J. Rennie Stavely, and Jim Wyatt

`White Half Runner' is a popular green bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) cultivar in the southern Appalachian region of the United States. The cultivar is highly susceptible to rust and virus diseases. Nine breeding lines with `White Half Runner' parentage were compared to `White Half Runner' for rust tolerance, yield, and pod quality in 1998 and 1999 field trials at Crossville, Tenn. The BelTenn selections were developed by USDA plant breeders and the UT selections were developed by University of Tennessee plant breeders. Selections `BelTenn-RR-2', `BelTenn 4-12028', `BelTenn 4-12046', `BelTenn 4-12053', `BelTenn 5-2717' and `UT-96-3' were resistant to rust. Only `UT 96-4' had lower yields than `White Half Runner' in 1999. The BelTenn lines had slightly smaller pods, and the UT selections had larger and rougher pods than `White Half Runner'. `BelTenn-RR-2' wasreleased in 1995 as a breeding line with rust resistance and pod quality similar to `White Half Runner'. Further selection of BelTenn-RR-2 by a private seed company led to the naming of a cultivar named `Volunteer White Half Runner'.

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B. Scully, R. Provvidenti, D.E. Halseth, and D.H. Wallace

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B. Scully, R. Provvidenti, D.E. Halseth, and D.H. Wallace

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B. Scully, R. Provvidenti, D.E. Halseth, and D.H. Wallace