Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 204 items for :

  • All content x
Clear All
Open access

Leora Radetsky, Jaimin S. Patel, and Mark S. Rea

commercial horticultural luminaires: blue LEDs (λ max ≈ 450 nm) and red LEDs (λ max ≈ 660 nm). The present study used commercial horticultural LED luminaires to examine the ability of red and blue LEDs to reduce DM disease pressure on basil commonly grown

Open access

Rhuanito Soranz Ferrarezi and Donald S. Bailey

produced continuously in the UVI Commercial Aquaponics System, including a diversity of cultivars and cultural practices ( Rakocy et al., 1997 ). Economic studies of lettuce and basil production also have been conducted ( Bailey et al., 1997 ; Rakocy et al

Open access

Chengyan Yue, Zata Vickers, Jingjing Wang, Neil O. Anderson, Lauren Wisdorf, Jenna Brady, Michele Schermann, Nicholas Phelps, and Paul Venturelli

can be produced in nontraditional areas, and consumers in urban areas can get locally produced crops ( Coyle and Ellison, 2017 ). Ocimum basilicum L. (basil), one of the most popular fresh culinary herbs, is a high-value, short-season crop ( Ferrarezi

Free access

Orapin Kerdchoechuen, Natta Laohakunjit, Sasathorn Singkornard, and Frank B. Matta

and had a significant reduction in the number of progeny derived from the maize weevil indicating the potential use of the plant in postharvest control ( Asawalam et al., 2008b ). Sweet basil ( O. basilicum L.), for example, is a major essential oil

Full access

Kellie J. Walters and Christopher J. Currey

Basil is a popular genus in the mint family (Lamiaceae) with more than 30 species currently identified ( Simon et al., 1999 ) and a constantly increasing number of cultivars ( Paton, 1992 ). Basil species and cultivars vary widely in their

Full access

Kellie J. Walters and Christopher J. Currey

Basil ( Ocimum sp.) is a commonly cultivated herb with ≈64 species identified ( Tucker and DeBaggio, 2009 ). Although basil is used in several ways, including for essential oil production, as an ornamental plant in landscapes, and as a cut flower

Open access

Yuan Li, Joseph Heckman, Andrew Wyenandt, Neil Mattson, Edward Durner, and A.J. Both

Sweet basil is a globally important herb crop grown for its unique aroma and flavor ( Akbari et al., 2018 ). Basil is in the mint family ( Lamiaceae ) and comprises more than 60 species native to tropical regions ( Satpute et al., 2019 ). Field

Free access

Robert M. Pyne, Adolfina R. Koroch, Christian A. Wyenandt, and James E. Simon

Basil ( Ocimum sp.) is a highly diverse genus ( Vieira et al., 2003 ) that includes at least 64 species ( Paton et al., 1999 ), several of which are among the most widely cultivated and consumed herbs worldwide ( Simon et al., 1990 ). In the United

Free access

Christian A. Wyenandt, James E. Simon, Margaret T. McGrath, and Daniel L. Ward

Sweet basil ( Ocimum basilicum L., Fam. Lamaiaceae) is the most commercially important annual culinary herb crop grown in the United States. Sweet basil is grown for culinary use for both fresh and dry consumption and as a source of essential oil

Free access

Jaimin S. Patel, Shouan Zhang, and Maria I. Costa de Novaes

Sweet basil ( Ocimum basilicum L.; Lamiales: Lamiaceae) is commercially the most important culinary herbal crop grown in the United States. Basil, a member of the mint family, is native to central Asia and northwest India and is grown for both