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Kathleen M. Kelley, James C. Sellmer, and Rebecca H. Robert

Public gardens and arboreta rely on members to provide a stable source of funding and, in some cases, to volunteer their time and assist with facilitating functions and events ( San Francisco Botanical Garden, 2010 ). As evident in several published

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Kathleen M. Kelley, James C. Sellmer, and Rebecca H. Robert

to how consumers view public gardens and arboreta as a resource and destination and how these spaces should structure events, activities, education, and entertainment to best coincide with consumer interests. Thus, public gardens and arboreta can

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Mary Hockenberry Meyer and David Michener

(APGA) lists more than 80 public gardens owned and operated by colleges and universities ( DeBuhr, 2011 ). Chicago, Missouri, New York, Rancho Santa Ana, and Fairchild botanic gardens, as well as Morton, Arnold, and Holden arboreta, have academic

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Mary Hockenberry Meyer, Stan Hokanson, Susan Galatowitsch, and James Luby

. Ecological restoration research program. Worldwide, botanic gardens and arboreta are playing a central role in advancing the science and practice of ecological restoration ( Dixon and Sharrock, 2009 ). In many ways, botanic gardens and arboreta are “pre

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Stephanie Gale Jutila and Mary Hockenberry Meyer

A decision case was developed and used to train volunteers at the Minnesota Landscape Arboretum. The case presents a real life dilemma for volunteers at public horticultural institutions, allowing volunteers to experience a realistic decision making process, applicable to their volunteer jobs. Volunteers are able to identify that the decisions they make in their volunteer position ultimately affect the institution as a whole including visitors and volunteers. The case is written as an active learning tool for use in a volunteer orientation or continuing education workshop. Volunteers benefit from an enhanced understanding of the importance of communication of changes in life commitment, including how these changes relate to their particular volunteer interests.

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Stephanie G. Jutila, Mary Hockenberry Meyer, and Emily Hoover

Focus groups and surveys were used to align volunteers' work with the mission and organizational objectives of the Minnesota Landscape Arboretum (MLA) at the University of Minnesota. In focus groups, a cross-section of volunteers discussed several issues, including how they could more directly contribute to the mission and organizational objectives of the institution. Staff were surveyed on their perceptions of the volunteer workforce, including their current use of volunteers. Focus groups and surveys proved to be valuable tools to approach programmatic changes in volunteer involvement at the MLA by providing a platform to discuss the areas where change is needed, as well as what kind of change should occur. Focus groups can be a key tool in involving volunteers, by allowing them to provide input on changes that directly affect them, in addition to furthering the understanding of volunteer needs and motivations.

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A.J. Lewis and J.M. Affolter

The State Botanical Garden of Georgia serves as an important academic resource for the University of Georgia by supporting interdisciplinary learning experiences in fields including botany, horticulture, environmental design, ecology, anthropology, geography, instructional technology, science education, entomology, forestry, and art. Field trips, independent study, internships, work-study and other botanical garden experiences strengthen and support the university's teaching, research and public service/outreach missions.

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Mary Hockenberry Meyer and Karl Foord

garden centers, appears to be what consumers would like. Supplying information to the public where they look for it and want to find it appears to be a good strategy and should be developed by more universities and arboreta or botanical gardens

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Gayle M. Volk, Adam D. Henk, Christopher M. Richards, Philip L. Forsline, and C. Thomas Chao

as M. pumila . Many of these accessions were donated to the repository from other gene banks or arboreta. In addition to these species/varieties, the literature describes a number of variations in nomenclature for Central Asian Malus species