Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 110 items for :

  • "aminoethoxyvinylglycine" x
Clear All
Free access

Valeria Sigal Escalada and Douglas D. Archbold

Techniques that stop premature fruit drop and slow ripening of climacteric fruit are valuable to growers, shippers, and retailers, permitting efficient harvest and orderly marketing. Aminoethoxyvinylglycine (AVG) is commercially used to stop apple

Free access

Bruce W. Wood

treating fruit with ethylene can trigger fruit drop ( Kays et al., 1975 ; Wood, 1983 ). Additionally, AVG {Aminoethoxyvinylglycine [S]-trans-2-Amino-4-(2-aminoethoxy)-3-butenoic acid hydrochloride, a naturally occurring plant growth regulator produced by

Free access

Bruce W. Wood, Leonardo Lombardini and Richard J. Heerema

. Aminoethoxyvinylglycine (AVG) {[S]-trans-2-amino-4-(2-aminoethoxy)-3-butenoic acid hydrochloride, a naturally occurring plant growth regulator produced by fermentation; formulated as ReTain® at 15% a.i.; EPA Reg. No. 73049-45; Valent BioSciences, Libertyville, IL}, is a

Free access

Valeria Sigal Escalada and Douglas D. Archbold

Techniques that slow ripening of apple are valuable tools that can maintain fruit quality during cold storage. Aminoethoxyvinylglycine (AVG) inhibits the pyridoxal phosphate-linked enzyme aminocyclopropane synthase (ACS) activity ( Capitani et al

Free access

Warren E. Shafer, Gregory Clarke, Robert Fritts Jr., Ricardo Menendez and Derek Woolard

Aminoethoxyvinylglycine (AVG) is a naturally occurring plant growth regulator that was first patented in 1973 (US patent #3,751,459). AVG has been shown to competitively inhibit ACC (1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid) synthase (Yu et al., 1979, Arch. Biochem. Biophys. 198:280–286), which is the enzyme responsible for the conversion of S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) to ACC, the immediate precursor of ethylene in plants. Because of this unique mode of action, AVG has been tested over the years on a wide array of plant tissues. Studies on plants of horticultural interest have included cut flowers (e.g., Baker et al., 1977 HortScience 12:38–39), greenhouse crops (e.g., Saltveit and Larson, 1981, J. Amer. Soc. Hort. Sci. 106:156–159), and tree fruits (e.g., Bangerth, 1978, J. Amer. Soc. Hort. Sci. 103:401–403). AVG is currently being developed by Abbott Laboratories for use on apples (e.g., Shafer et al., 1995, Proc. 22nd Annu. PGRSA Mtg, pg 11–15). This presentation: a) briefly reviews prior literature regarding the effects of AVG on apples, b) provides an update on Abbott's commercial development program, and c) outlines some near-term research objectives for the use of AVG on apples.

Free access

Hong Zhu, Eric P. Beers and Rongcai Yuan

are associated with young fruit ethylene production ( Dal Cin et al., 2005 ; Li and Yuan, 2008 ). Aminoethoxyvinylglycine is a potent inhibitor of ethylene biosynthesis through inhibiting ACS enzyme activity ( Boller et al., 1979 ). Application of

Free access

Zhiguo Ju, Yongbing Yuan and Chenglian Liu

Aminoethoxyvinylglycine (AVG), an ethylene synthesis inhibitor, is a potential chemical to prevent preharvest fruit drop and improve storage quality of apples. Since ethylene promotes anthocyanin synthesis, effects of AVG on fruit coloration is a concern of fruit growers. `Delicious' apple trees were treated with 250 ppm AVG on 6 and 26 Aug. and 15 Sept., respectively. Fruit were harvested for analysis on 5 Oct. The anthocyanin accumulation and chlorophyll degradation in treated fruit were significantly lower when AVG was applied in August, which resulted in a low percentage of red fruit compared with the control. However, AVG did not inhibit anthocyanin synthesis and chlorophyll degradation when applied on 15 Sept. UDPGalactose: flavonoid-3-o-glycosyl-transferase activity also was reduced by AVG treatment in August, but not in September.

Free access

Ross E. Byers

AVG sprays applied to `Redhaven' peach (Prunus persica L. Batsch) trees 53, 72, 80, 87, or 94 days after full bloom (AFB) slightly delayed the first harvest date. Applications at 53 or 94 days AFB slightly delayed cumulative second and third harvests. The fourth (final) harvest was not delayed by any AVG spray. Firm commercial-harvest peach and nectarine fruit submerged for 60 s in AVG solutions softened more slowly than the controls when kept at room temperature (≈24 °C) for 3 to 12 days. AVG-treated fruit dipped in ethephon after 4 days showed an increased rate of softening compared to fruits treated only with AVG. Fruit submerged in AVG solutions and stored at 1.5 or 4.5 °C for 12 to 18 days did not differ in firmness from the controls upon removal from cold storage but sometimes softened more slowly after storage. Ethylene evolution from AVG-dipped fruit was not measureable even after it was kept at room temperature for 12 days. Chemicals used: Aminoethoxyvinylglycine hydrochloride (AVG); 2-chloroethylphosphonic acid (ethephon).

Free access

Margrethe Serek and Michael S. Reid

Spraying flowering plants of Schlumbergera truncata (Haw.) `White Christmas' with aminoethoxyvinylglycine (AVG), an inhibitor of ethylene biosynthesis, did not prevent the rapid loss of flower buds caused by exposure to 1 μl of ethylene/liter. Treatment with the silver thiosulfate anionic complex (STS) strongly inhibited such effects. The rate of bud drop in ethylene-free air (interior environment room) was somewhat reduced by AVG treatment, although total display life of treated plants was not significantly different from that of the controls. STS treatment reduced the rate of bud drop, and increased display life by 20 %.

Free access

Robert D. Belding and Gail R.W. Lokaj

`Biscoe' and `Encore' peach [Prunus persica (L.) Batsch] trees were treated in two years with AVG at 7, 14, or 21 days before first harvest (DBFH) or as a nontreated control (NTC). Fruit were harvested every 2 to 3 days based on observed initial yielding of fruit flesh and ground color. Fruit were further evaluated for maturity and quality based on the production of ethylene, ground color, diameter, flesh firmness, soluble sugars, and woolliness. Evaluations occurred 1 day after harvest and after 14 and 28 days in cold storage. AVG applications delayed early harvests of `Biscoe', but `Encore' harvests were not affected. Across all preharvest treatment timings, AVG reduced ethylene production by 64%. Ethylene production and fruit softening were most inhibited for fruit treated with AVG 7 DBFH. In this study, fruit treated with AVG demonstrated a significant negative correlation between fruit ethylene production and firmness. Average flesh firmness of fruit from AVG treatments were 11.8 Newtons greater than NTC fruit. Fruit treated 21 or 14 DBFH exhibited greener ground color than NTC fruit or fruit treated 7 DBFH. The NTC fruit had the highest ground color values, fruit treated 7 DBFH were intermediate, and fruit treated 21 or 14 DBFH had the lowest values for ground color. AVG has potential use as a management tool for controlling the timing of harvest and for allowing fruit to ripen more slowly and to hang longer on the tree, thus improving fruit size. In addition, AVG assists in maintaining the postharvest flesh firmness required to withstand handling during marketing. Chemical name used: aminoethoxyvinylglycine (AVG).