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Louise Ferguson

54 WORKSHOP 7 Alternative Production and Protection Practices for Tree Nut Crops

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Michael W. Smith

54 WORKSHOP 7 Alternative Production and Protection Practices for Tree Nut Crops

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Jeff Olsen

54 WORKSHOP 7 Alternative Production and Protection Practices for Tree Nut Crops

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Richard P. Buchner

54 WORKSHOP 7 Alternative Production and Protection Practices for Tree Nut Crops

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J.L. Adrian, C.C. Montgomery, B.K. Behe, K.M. Tilt, and P.A. Duffy

In-field (IF) and above-ground (AG) container production of landscape ornamentals are both conventional methods which were compared to a newer production method, pot-in-pot (PIP). Our objective was to determine costs and economic feasibility for each method. Model nurseries were synthesized to represent a 4-ha nursery utilizing 2 ha of production area operating over a three-year period. Finished plant material were grown in 40-L containers for above-ground and pot-in-pot production, and 2 m ball and burlapped material for in-field production. One budget was constructed to reflect costs for Lagerstroemia indica, Cornusflorida, and × Cupressocyparis leylandii under each production method. Capital requirements and annual fixed costs for all three species were lowest for IF and highest for PIP production. Variable costs for all tree species were lowest for IF and highest for AG with PIP intermediate. With better utilization of a given production area, PIP had the lowest total cost of production, followed by AG and IF methods.

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Carol A. Miles

Sales of organic foods are one of the fastest growing segments of Washington state's food industry. In response to grower demand for information on organic and sustainable production practices, Washington State University (WSU) created an Extension Agricultural Systems position. This position has been instrumental in helping WSU gain the trust and recognition of organic growers. The position enabled WSU to demonstrate that it has a commitment to organic and sustainable research and extension activities. This paper describes the key activities of this position: 1) finding out research needs, 2) on-farm research approaches, 3) formation of regional research programs, and 4) creation of the WSU Food and Farm Connections Team. Grant funded on-farm research, interdisciplinary teams, and extension publications have been major emphases of the position.

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W.B. Evans, V. Cerven, N. Winter, and C.E. Coker

This report presents preliminary data and arguments supporting the investigation and possible adoption of a low-cost method of cherry and grape tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) production. Cherry and grape tomato crops are currently grown using indeterminate or relatively large determinate plants requiring trellising and significant hand labor at harvest. In contrast, processing tomato crops are usually determinate cultivars raised without supporting systems, and they are harvested mechanically. In Summer 2009, a Mississippi trial of home garden tomato cultivars included a compact, mounding yellow-fruited cherry tomato that produced more than 2 kg of fruit per plant in the first harvest. The architecture of the plant, high yield potential, and concentrated set indicate that there is potential to grow commercial cherry and grape tomato crops in much the same way commercial processing tomatoes are grown: unsupported on bare or mulched beds, with once-over harvest. Such a system could reduce the monetary and labor costs of production of cherry and grape tomatoes. Seed companies, tomato growers, and supporting agencies should work together to further investigate the potential of this system of cherry and grape tomato production.

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Joseph H. Connell

54 WORKSHOP 7 Alternative Production and Protection Practices for Tree Nut Crops

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Dewayne L. Ingram and Charles R. Hall

the carbon footprint and variable cost structure of selected nursery species ( Hall and Ingram, 2014 , 2015 ; Ingram, 2012 , 2013 ; Ingram and Hall, 2014a , 2014b ) but to date have not compared the results of alternative production systems on the

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W. Garrett Owen, Alyssa Hilligoss, and Roberto G. Lopez

competitive advantage ( Koch, 1996 ; Ortiz et al., 2012 ; Wien, 2009 ; Yue and Hall, 2010 ). Although cut flowers were traditionally grown in greenhouses, alternative production methods including field ( Starman et al., 1995 ) and unheated high tunnel