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Meng-Jen Wu, Lorenzo Zacarias, Mikal E. Saltveit and Michael S. Reid

Continuous treatment with 8% ethanol doubled the vase life of `White Sim' carnation (Dianthus caryophyllus L.) flowers. Other alcohols, other concentrations of ethanol, or pulse treatments with up to 8% ethanol had little or no effect. Butanol and longer-chain alcohols shortened vase life and caused the flower stem to fold. During their eventual senescence, the petals of ethanol-treated flowers did not inroll; instead, individual petals dried slowly from their tips. Very little ethylene was produced by ethanol-treated flowers, and the normal increase in ACC content and EFE activity was also suppressed. Ethanol treatment also decreased the flowers' sensitivity to exogenous ethylene.

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Tomomi Eguchi and Chieri Kubota

in the field. Fatty alcohol and fatty acid methyl ester with carbon chain lengths from 8 to 12, emulsified with appropriate surfactants, have been reported to kill the rapidly dividing meristematic tissues such as apical and axillary buds without

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Christian Chervin, Janyce K. Truett and Jim Speirs

Regulation of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH), activity of pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC) and accumulation of acetaldehyde and ethanol in `Packham's Triumph' pears (Pyrus communis, L.) subsequent to different storage regimes were investigated. Pears were stored for two months at -1 °C either in air (Air) or under hypoxia at 3 kPa O2 (Hyp) and subsequently warmed and allowed to ripen in air at 20 °C. One set of fruit stored in air at -1 °C was subjected to 3 days of hypoxia at -1 °C (Air+Hyp) before ripening in air. Acetaldehyde, ethanol and methanol levels increased in all fruit in a similar fashion during ripening and did not reflect differences in storage treatments. During ripening, ADH activities in posthypoxic samples were generally twice that of air samples. PDC activities increased for ≈6 days during ripening then declined slightly but did not differ significantly among treatments. Upon transfer to 20 °C in air, slightly higher levels of Adh mRNA were observed in samples treated with hypoxia than in air controls. Over the following 2 days at 20 °C, the Adh transcription was markedly induced in Air and Air+Hyp samples. Although all Adh mRNAs returned to control levels within 4 days, ADH activities remained higher in hypoxia-treated fruit than in controls for up to 18 days. These results suggest that, in ripening pears, ADH does not limit ethanol production, and that the expression of this enzyme comprises post-transcriptional regulations. GenBank accession numbers of the Adh cDNAs are AFO 31899 and AFO 31900.

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John C. Beaulieu, Rebecca E. Stein-Chisholm and Deborah L. Boykin

-Aldrich Fine Chemicals, Flavors and Fragrances Products [St. Louis, MO]}, according to Table 1 . Compound classes were defined and comprised of aldehydes (ALD), alcohols (OLS), esters (EST), ketones (ONE), furans (FUR), terpenoids (OID), and aromatics (ARO

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Yong Zhang, Chunxia Fu, Yujing Yan, Yan’an Wang, Ming Li, Meixiang Chen, Jianping Qian, Xinting Yang and Shuhan Cheng

whether the sugar alcohol zinc is effective has not been clear. Recently, sugar compounds containing Zn have been advocated for use with little information to support their use. The goal of the present study was to compare the effects of the application of

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Shawna L. Daley and Richard L. Hassell

unacceptably low rootstock survival. Other preliminary research of chemicals including maleic hydrazide, oryzalin, sulfuric acid, and fatty alcohols indicated that only the fatty alcohol successfully destroys the rootstock meristem without damaging the

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Jeffrey A. Anderson

conducted to determine treatment temperature ranges that included apparent absorbance maxima for each cosolvent. An exception was n-propyl alcohol, which caused increased absorbance at 21 °C when used at 500 m m . All reagents were obtained from Sigma

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Yan Li, Hongyan Qi, Yazhong Jin, Xiaobin Tian, Linlin Sui and Yan Qiu

identified in oriental sweet melon is attributed to several volatile compounds including alcohols, acids, aldehydes, and esters that are biosynthetically derived from FAs, amino acids, carotenoids, and terpenes ( Aubert and Bourger, 2004 ; Beaulieu and Grimm

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Shawna L. Daley, Jeffrey Adelberg and Richard L. Hassell

and even before transplanting of grafted plants. Manual meristem removal often removes the meristem only partially, allowing meristem regeneration to occur. Previous studies have demonstrated the success of fatty alcohol rootstock treatments in

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Jinhe Bai, Elizabeth Baldwin, Jack Hearn, Randy Driggers and Ed Stover

standards for both harvests ( Elston et al., 2005 ). Other important terpene compounds included two terpene alcohols, linalool, and α-terpineol and two terpene aldehydes, citral and sinensal ( Tables 1 and 2 ). Both linalool and α-terpineol were detected