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John F. Murphy and Fenny Dane

(WMV), and zucchini yellow mosaic virus (ZYMV)] are transmitted by aphids in a nonpersistent manner and are considered a constant threat to cucurbit crops ( Guner and Wehner, 2008 ; Zitter et al., 1996 ). Efforts to reduce losses caused by these

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Rebecca Nelson Brown and James R. Myers

Marker-based selection for resistance to zucchini yellow mosaic virus in squash (Cucurbita spp.) would allow breeders to screen individual plants for resistance to multiple viruses. The C. moschata landrace Nigerian Local is widely used as a source of resistance in C. pepo breeding programs. We used RAPDs and bulk-segregant analysis to screen two BC1 populations for a marker linked to the dominant major gene for resistance from Nigerian Local. The initial cross was Waltham Butternut × Nigerian Local; the test populations were created from reciprocal backcrosses to Waltham Butternut. Both populations segregated 1:1 for resistance when hand-inoculated with ZYMV. RAPD primers were screened on a resistant bulk and a susceptible bulk from each population, and Waltham Butternut and Nigerian Local. Primers that gave bands linked to resistance were further screened using DNA from individual plants in each population. The potential markers will be tested on several populations derived from crosses between summer squash (C. pepo) and Nigerian Local to determine if they would be useful for selection in a C. pepo background.

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Thanda Wai, Jack Staub and Rebecca Grumet

TMG-1 is resistant to ZYMV and WMV-2, two closely related potyviruses. Resistance to ZYMV is due to a single recessive gene (Provvidenti, 1987); however, two recessive genes appear to confer resistance to WMV-2. We sought to further characterize the resistances by studying possible linkage relationships with physiological, morphological, electromorphic, and phytopathological markers. TMG-1, WI-2757 (an inbred line susceptible to both viruses), and their F2 progeny were screened for various single gene characters that differ between the two parents. Linkages reported in the literature were also observed in this study: (1) between bitterfree (bi) and female (F), and (2) between numerous spine (ns), small spine (ss), and tuberculate (Tu). New linkages detected were between: (1) resistance to WMV-2 and F, (2) resistance to WMV-2 and ZYMV, and (3) possibly resistance to ZYMV with fusarium and ns.

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Mark E. Herrington, Svenning Prytz, Ross M. Wright, Ian O. Walker, Peter Brown, Denis M. Persley and Ray S. Greber

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George E. Boyhan, James E. Brown, Cynthia Channel-Butcher and Virginia K. Perdue

A 3-year study to evaluate mulch type (reflective and black) and new virus resistant summer squash (Cucurbita pepo L.) varieties was undertaken. In the first year of the study (1996), in Shorter, Ala., under slight virus pressure, silver painted mulch suppressed virus symptoms through the final evaluation 2 months after planting. In addition, virus symptoms were significantly more prevalent on `Dixie' compared to `Supersett', `Tigress', `HMX 5727', `Jaguar', `Destiny III', and `Prelude II'. In the second year (1997), two different experiments were conducted in Savannah, Ga., where there was no virus pressure. In the first experiment at the Savannah location, `Tigress' and `HMX 6704' had significantly higher yields than `Destiny III', `Prelude II', `Puma', `Jaguar', `Meigs', `Dixie', and `Supersett'. In the second Savannah experiment, `Prelude II' and `Destiny III' had significantly higher yields than `Zucchini Elite', `Supersett', `HMX 6704', and `Jaguar'. In 1998 at Shorter, there was no difference in virus incidence based on mulch used. Although there were differences in virus incidence among varieties, the lowest incidence was 70% of plants infected for `Prelude II'. In addition to field evaluations, these varieties were evaluated for resistance to zucchini yellow mosaic virus under greenhouse conditions. Varieties HMX 7710, HMX 6704, Puma, Tigress, Prelude II, Jaguar, and Destiny III were significantly more resistant compared to varieties Zucchini Elite, Meigs, Supersett, and Dixie. In conclusion, reflective mulch was effective only under slight virus pressure.

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Karen R. Harris, Kai-Shu Ling, W. Patrick Wechter and Amnon Levi

of commercial watermelon production worldwide ( Huttner et al., 2001 ). Viruses that affect watermelon include papaya ringspot virus-watermelon strain (PRSV-W), watermelon mosaic virus (WMV), and ZYMV ( Guner and Wehner, 2008 ; Strange et al., 2002

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Nihat Guner, Luis A. Rivera-Burgos and Todd C. Wehner

viruses affecting watermelon in the United States are Zucchini yellow mosaic virus (ZYMV), Papaya ringspot virus -watermelon strain (PRSV-W), and Watermelon mosaic virus (WMV). All three viruses are nonpersistently transmitted by several species of

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Kai-Shu Ling and Amnon Levi

Zucchini yellow mosaic virus (ZYMV), a member of genus potyvirus in the family Potyviridae, is one of the major viruses on cucurbits. Cultivars of Cucurbita pepo , Cucumis melo , and Citrullus lanatus are particularly affected. However

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Axel O. Ramírez-Madera and Michael J. Havey

The potyviruses (Potyviridae) are especially destructive for cucumber ( Cucumis sativus L.) and production is often negatively affected by Watermelon mosaic virus (WMV), the watermelon strain of the Papaya ringspot virus (PRSV-W), and ZYMV

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Nihat Guner, Zvezdana Pesic-VanEsbroeck, Luis A. Rivera-Burgos and Todd C. Wehner

the United States are Zucchini yellow mosaic virus (ZYMV), Papaya ringspot virus-watermelon strain (PRSV-W, formerly Watermelon mosaic virus-1 ), and Watermelon mosaic virus (WMV, formerly Watermelon mosaic virus-2 ) ( Ali et al., 2012 ; Chen