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Open access

A. L. Vaigro-Wolff and M. R. Warmund

Abstract

Flurprimidol and XE-1019, applied at 15.0 and 2.5 mg/plant respectively, suppressed shoot dry weight and increased xylem pressure potential of Forsythia spectabilis Spaeth when drought was induced but did not affect leaf size or root dry weight. XE-1019 did not suppress growth when applied on 28 Aug. 1985. Plants treated with flurprimidol in late August had less shoot growth and higher xylem pressure potential than untreated controls or plants treated with XE-1019. Mefluidide applied as a foliar spray at 5000 mg·liter-1 on 25 June 1985 did not suppress growth or affect plant moisture status of forsythia. None of the growth regulators reduced the transpiration rate of forsythia plants. Chemical names used: N-[2,4-dimethyl-5-[[(trifluoromethyl) sulfonyl]amino]phenyl]acetamide (mefluidide); α-(1-methylethyl)- α-[4-trifluoromethoxy)phenyl]-5-pyrimidinemethanol (flurprimidol); (E)-(p-chlorophenyl)-4,4-dimethyl-2-(1,2,4-triazol-1-yl)-1-penten-3-ol (XE-1019).

Open access

James E. Barrett, Carolyn A. Bartuska, and Terril A. Nell

Abstract

• In the article “Efficacy of Ancymidol, Daminozide, Flurprimidol, Paclobutrazol, and XE-1019 when Followed by Irrigation”, by James E. Barrett, Carolyn A. Bartuska, and Terril A. Nell (HortScience 22(6): 1287–1289, December 1987), Table 1 was printed incorrectly. The corrected table appears below.

Open access

James E. Barrett, Carolyn A. Bartuska, and Terril A. Nell

Abstract

Vegetative Chrysanthemum morifolium Ramat. ‘Nob Hill’ plants were treated with foliar sprays of ancymidol, daminozide, flurprimidol, paclobutrazol, or XE-1019 and then overhead-irrigated 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 8, or 24 hr later. Irrigation prior to 4 hr reduced the efficacy of daminozide but did not alter efficacy of other chemicals. Efficacy was not affected when similar plants were treated with a medium drench of the same chemicals, except daminozide, and followed with irrigation at 1,24, or 48 hr. Chemical names used: α-cyclopropyl-α-(4-methoxyphenyl)-5-pyrmidinemethanol (ancymidol), butanedioic acid mono-(2,2-diemthylhydrazide) (daminozide), α-(l-methylethyl)-α-[4-(trifluoromethoxy)phenyl]-5-pyrimidinemethanol (EL-500) (flurprimidol), (±)-(R*,R*)-beta-((4-chlorophenyl)methyl)-α-(1,1-dimethylethyl)-1H-1,2,4-triazole-1-ethanol (PP-333) (paclobutrazol), and (E)-(p-chlorophenyl)-4,4-dimethyl-2-(1,2,4-triazol-1-yl)-l-penten-ol (XE-1019).

Open access

Samutumwa Liyembani and Bradley H. Taylor

Abstract

A single or four sequential foliar sprays of paclobutrazol (PBZ) and XE-1019 (Valent Corp., Walnut Creek, Calif.) to peach [Prunus persica (L.) Batsch.] supplied, respectively, 7.5 to 480 mg a.i. and 0.75 to 48 mg a.i. doses per tree. These treatments reduced the net change in total shoot length (current-season extension shoots plus lateral shoots) occurring over the 15-week period after the sprays were applied by up to 80% and 69%, compared to the control, for each compound, respectively. The average number of lateral shoots was decreased 85% and 81% by the highest dose of each material. The shoot and whole plant dry weight at the end of the growing season (15 weeks after treatment) were ≍22% and 27% lower than the control for PBZ and XE-1019, respectively. Trunk cross-sectional area, leaf area, and dry weight of leaves and roots were also smaller on the trees treated by either compound. Root : shoot ratios were not influenced by any treatment. Chemical names used: β-[(4-chlorophenyl)-4,4-dimethyl-2-(1,2,4-triazole-1-ethanol (paclobutrazol); (E)-1-(p-chlorophenyl)-4-,4-dimethyl-2-(1,2,4-triazol-1-yl)-1-penten-3-ol (Valent XE-1019).

Open access

Douglas A. Bailey

Abstract

Florists’ hydrangea is a woody perennial that has been adapted to potted plant production. A major factor in a hydrangea forcing program is height control. Currently, daminozide is used for reducing internode elongation in hydrangeas, but high concentrations (5000 to 7500 mg-liter-1) are sometimes needed to control vigorous cultivars such as ‘Rose Supreme’ (Jung, 1964; Ulery, 1978). Uniconazole has been shown to be an effective height-controlling agent at low concentrations for woody perennials, including Forsythia, Ligustrum, Pyracantha, and Rhododendron spp. (Knox and Norcini, 1987; Vaigro-Wolff and Warmund, 1987). Therefore, uniconazole was examined as a potential height-controlling chemical for florists’ hydrangea. Dormant plants of H. macrophylla ‘Rose Supreme’ were defoliated and placed into 4C dark storage for 6 weeks beginning 2 Dec. 1987. On 13 Jan. 1988, the plants were removed from the cooler, potted one per 1.3-liter plastic container, and placed into a 26/15C (venting/night) greenhouse. The growth medium consisted of a 1 soil : 2 sphagnum peat : 2 perlite (by volume) mixture amended with 890 g treble superphosphate, 593 g KNO3, 593 g MgS04, 4.75 kg ground dolomitic limestone, and 74 g Frit Industries Trace Elements No. 555 (Peters Fertilizer Products, W.R. Grace & Co., Fo-gelsville, Pa.) per cubic meter. The plants were fertilized at each watering with Ν and K, each at 200 mg-liter-1, supplied from 367 mg NH4NO3/liter and 517 mg KNO3/liter, respectively. Fertilizer solution was maintained at 6.0 pH by injecting 75% (w/w) technical grade H3PO4 into the system, supplying 37 mg P/liter at every watering. Each plant was pruned at potting, allowing only two shoots per plant to develop, and pots were spaced at 40 × 40 cm during forcing.

Free access

Harry K. Tayama and Stephen A. Carver

Residual activity of a single uniconazole spray (15 mg a.i./liter), uniconazole drench (600 μg a.i./pot), and daminozide spray (5000 mg a.i./liter) were compared to an untreated control using the `Bright Golden Anne' chrysanthemum [Dendranthema grandiflorum (Ramat.) Kitamura]. Based on weekly internode growth, spray and drench treatments with daminozide and uniconazole remained active for 2 to 2.5 and 3 to 3.5 weeks, respectively. Chemical names used: butanedioic acid mono (2,2-dimethylhydrazide) (daminozide); (E)-1-(p-chlorophenyl)-4,4-diemethyl 1-2(1,2,4-triazol-2-yl)-l-penten-3-01 (uniconazole).

Free access

Terri Woods Starman, Teresa A. Cerny, and Tracy L. Grindstaff

Height control and flowering responses to uniconazole spray or drench treatments were measured for `Multibloom Scarlet' and `Red Elite' geranium (Pelargonium ×hortorum L.H. Bailey). Total plant height of both cultivars was reduced proportionately to the height of a 10-cm container when the uniconazole drench concentration was 0.025 mg a.i./pot. Used as a spray, uniconazole was not as effective in restricting total plant height of either cultivar. Foliage height was shortened more than inflorescence height. Inflorescence diameter was decreased with increasing uniconazole drench concentrations. Sprays did not affect inflorescence diameter of either cultivar. Uniconazole effect on days to flower varied with cultivar and application method. Chemical name used: (E)-(S)-1-(4-chlorophenyl)-4,4-dimethyl-2-(1,2,4-triazol-1-yl)-pent-1-ene-3-ol (uniconazole).

Free access

Bradford C. Bearce and Suman Singha

Open access

Douglas A. Bailey and William B. Miller

Abstract

Oriental hybrid lilies (Lilium speciosum Thunb.) are grown as flowering potted plants or cut flowers (Ball, 1985). However, a major problem with oriental hybrid lilies grown as pot plants is plant height greater than desired for an appropriate aesthetic ratio (Sachs et al., 1976). Uniconazole is an effective chemical growth retardant on other lily species and has the advantage over ancymidol of high activity at very low dosages (Hol-comb and McDowell, 1987; Shumac et al., 1988). With the present work, we evaluated the effectiveness of uniconazole in controlling height of two L. speciosum hybrids and compared uniconazole with ancymidol.

Open access

Steven E. Newman, Susan B. Tenney, and Melissa W. Follett

Abstract

Production of hibiscus commonly includes chloromequat chloride application to induce shortened plant internodes and to darken green leaves (Wilkins and Kotecki, 1985), but its application has been reported to reduce flower size and flower number of some cultivars (Ball, 1985). Therefore, we evaluated the effectiveness of (E)-(p-chlorophenyl)-4,4-dimethyl-2-(1,2,4-triazol-1-y1)-1-pentene-3-ol (uniconazole) for control of plant height, width, leaf distortion, and the number of breaks (vegetative shoots produced from lateral buds) per plant on hibiscus.