Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 16 items for :

  • "Treasure Valley" x
Clear All
Free access

Joel Felix, Clinton C. Shock, Joey Ishida, Erik B.G. Feibert and Lamont D. Saunders

temperatures drop at night ( Stoddard et al., 2013 ). These requirements closely match the weather conditions in the Treasure Valley of eastern Oregon and southwestern Idaho where the growing season is characterized by high evapotranspiration and low

Full access

Clinton C. Shock, Erik Feibert, Lynn Jensen, S. Krishna Mohan and Lamont D. Saunders

tributaries of the Snake River, a region frequently referred to as the Treasure Valley. This region is characterized by high onion bulb yields and production of a large proportion of large-diameter bulbs. Seed companies are continually developing new varieties

Full access

Brad Geary, Corey Ransom, Brad Brown, Dennis Atkinson and Saad Hafez

Onions grown in the Treasure Valley of Oregon and Idaho are worth about $112 million annually ( U.S. Department of Agriculture, 2002 ). They are grown on ≈20,000 acres and account for about one-third of the annual total onion storage crop in the

Full access

Clinton C. Shock, Erik Feibert and Lamont D. Saunders

Onion (Allium cepa) cultivars for commercial production in eastern Oregon and southwestern Idaho are evaluated annually in replicated yield trials conducted at the Malheur Experiment Station, Oregon State University, Ontario. Market demand has progressively called for larger bulb size and bulbs with single centers. At harvest onions were evaluated for maturity, number of bolters, and single centeredness. Cultivars showed a wide range of bulbs with only one growing point or “bullet” single centers, ranging from 1% to 57% in 2000, from 7% to 70% in 2001, and from 1% to 74% in 2002. The percentages of bulbs functionally single-centered for processing uses ranged from 18% to 88% in 2000, from 24.7% to 91.3% in 2001, and from 14.4% to 92% in 2002. Bulb yield and market grade were evaluated out of storage. Marketable yield after 4 months of storage varied significantly by cultivar from 643 to 1196 cwt/acre (72.1 to 134.1 Mg·ha–1) in 2000, from 538 to 980 cwt/acre (60.3 to 109.8 Mg·ha–1) in 2001, and from 583 to 1119 cwt/acre (65.3 to125.4 Mg·ha–1) in 2002. Averaging over cultivars, super colossal bulb size averaged 26%, 14%, and 10% in 2000, 2001, and 2002, respectively.

Full access

Clinton C. Shock, Joey K. Ishida, Eric P. Eldredge and Majid Seddigh

Potential new onion (Allium cepa L.) cultivars for commercial production in eastern Oregon and southwestern Idaho are evaluated annually in yield trials conducted at the Malheur Experiment Station, Oregon State University, Ontario, Ore. Bulb yield and market grade were determined in field trials for 63 yellow onion cultivars and lines in 1996 and for 49 cultivars and lines in 1997. Marketable yield out of storage in January ranged from 478 to 1131 cwt/acre (54 to 127 Mg·ha-1) in 1996, and from 383 to 912 cwt/acre (43 to 102 Mg·ha-1) in 1997. Marketable yields of `9003C', `Seville', `El Charro', `Sunre 1430', `El Padre', `Golden Security', `Bravo', and `X 202' were greater than 1000 cwt/acre (112 Mg·ha-1) in 1996. In 1997, marketable yields of `Seville', `Bravo', `Quest', `T-433', `9003C', `Goldstar', `Superstar', `RNX-10020', `Vision', and `Sweet Perfection' were greater than 850 cwt/acre (95 Mg·ha-1). Of the 30 cultivars evaluated both years, the average marketable yields of `Seville', 9003C, `Bravo', `Quest', and `Sweet Perfection' were among the highest. Many others showed potential for high yields and merit further evaluation. In both years, most bulbs of all selections graded jumbo [3 to 4 inch (7.6 to 10.2 cm) diameter] and colossal [>4 inch (10.2 cm) diameter], and only a few cultivars had more than 2% medium-size [2.25 to 3 inch (5.7 to 7.6 cm) diameter] bulbs. Infection by neck rot (Botrytis allii Munn.) and plate rot [Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cepa (H. N. Hans.) W.C. Snyder & H.N. Hans.] during storage was more severe in 1996 than in 1997, but in general, most cultivars showed relatively low levels of these diseases in both years. Averaged across all cultivars, bolting was evident in less than 1% of bulbs in both years.

Free access

C.C. Shock, E.B.G. Feibert and L.D. Saunders

Four potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) varieties were grown under four season-long sprinkler irrigation treatments in three successive years (1992-94) on silt loam soil in eastern Oregon. The check treatment was irrigated when soil water potential (SWP) at the 0.2-m depth reached -60 J·kg-1 and received at most the accumulated evapotranspiration (Etc) to avoid exceeding the water-holding capacity of the top 0.3 m of soil. The three deficit irrigation treatments were irrigated when SWP at the 0.2-m depth reached -80 J·kg-1 and had the following percent of the accumulated Etc applied at each irrigation: 1) 100%, 2) 70%, and 3) 70% during tuber bulking with 50% thereafter. Based on regression of applied water over 3 years, potatoes lost both total and U.S. No. 1 yields when irrigations were reduced. Based on regression on applied water, when irrigation was reduced gross revenues declined more than production costs, resulting in a reduction in profits. Leaching potential, as determined by the SWP treatments, was low for all treatments. The results of the study suggest that deficit irrigation of potatoes in the Treasure Valley of Oregon would not be a viable management tool, because the small financial benefits would not offset the high risks of reduced yields and profits from the reduced water applications.

Free access

Clinton C. Shock, Erik B. G. Feibert and Lamont D. Saunders

Onion (Allium cepa L.) production in the Treasure Valley of eastern Oregon and southwestern Idaho has been based on furrow irrigation with 318 kg·ha-1 N fertilizer and average yields of 70 Mg·ha-1, but these practices have been implicated in nitrate contamination of groundwater. Drip irrigation, introduced in the early 1990s, has several advantages, including reduced leaching losses. Since onion plant populations and N fertilizer rates can affect economic returns, studies were conducted in 1999, 2000, and 2001 to determine optimum plant populations and N fertilizer rates for subsurface drip-irrigated onion. Long-day onion (`Vision') was subjected to a combination of seven nitrogen fertilization rates (0 to 336 kg·ha-1 in 56-kg increments applied between late May and early July) and four plant populations (185, 250, 300, and 370 thousand plants/ha). Onion was grown on silt loam in two double rows spaced 0.56 m apart on 1.1 m beds with a drip tape buried 13 cm deep in the bed center. Soil water potential was maintained nearly constant at -20 kPa by automated irrigations based on soil water potential measurements at a 0.2-m depth. Onion bulbs were evaluated for yield and grade after 70 days of storage. Onion yield and grade were highly responsive to plant population. Onion marketable yield increased, and bulb diameter decreased with increasing plant population. Within the range of plant populations tested, gross returns were not always responsive to plant population. Returns were increased by the increase in marketable yield obtained with higher plant population, but higher plant population also reduced the production of the largest sized bulbs which had the highest value per weight. Onion yielded 95 Mg·ha-1 with no applied N fertilizer, averaged over plant populations and years. Onion yield and grade were not responsive to N fertilizer rate or interaction of N fertilizer rate with plant population. Preplant soil available N, N mineralization, and N in irrigation water all contributed N to the crop. Onion N uptake did not increase with increasing N fertilizer rate.

Free access

Clinton C. Shock, Erik B.G. Feibert, Alicia Riveira and Lamont D. Saunders

About 8000 ha of onions ( Allium cepa ) are grown in the Treasure Valley located in eastern Oregon and southwestern Idaho of the United States. These onions are mostly long-day cultivars and are marketed from August from the field and continuing to

Restricted access

Clinton C. Shock, Erik B.G. Feibert, Alicia Rivera, Lamont D. Saunders, Nancy Shaw and Francis F. Kilkenny

the Treasure Valley of Oregon. Treasure Valley crop evapotranspiration ranges from 500 to 800 mm·year −1 during the spring and summer depending on the crop and year ( AgriMet, 2017 ; Feibert and Shock, 2017 ). Although Dalea species are perennials

Restricted access

Clinton C. Shock, Erik B.G. Feibert, Alicia Rivera, Lamont D. Saunders, Nancy Shaw and Francis F. Kilkenny

yields (100–300 mm·year −1 ) was substantially lower than irrigation plus precipitation requirements for row crops in the Treasure Valley of eastern Oregon (evapotranspiration of 500–800 mm·year −1 , AgriMet, 2016 ; Feibert and Shock, 2016 ). Although