Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 16 items for :

  • Refine by Access: All x
Clear All
Free access

Santiago García-Martínez, Adrián Grau, Aranzazu Alonso, Fernando Rubio, Pedro Carbonell, and Juan J. Ruiz

between 75 and 125 g, and fruits are elongated-oval to bell-like in shape, with dark green shoulders and no ribs. Like all tomato landraces, De la pera cultivars are highly susceptible to several viruses, such as Tomato mosaic virus (ToMV), Tomato

Free access

Santiago García-Martínez, Adrián Grau, Aranzazu Alonso, Fernando Rubio, Pedro Carbonell, and Juan J. Ruiz

(five or more locules), flattened and strongly ribbed, green shoulder, and red flesh. The melting texture and mild flavor of these fruits makes them highly valued in salads. However, the incidence of several viruses as Tomato mosaic virus (ToMV

Free access

Santiago García-Martínez, Adrián Grau, Aranzazu Alonso, Fernando Rubio, Manuel Valero, and Juan J. Ruiz

The incidence of several viral diseases such as those caused by Tomato mosaic virus (ToMV) and Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) makes tomato landrace cultivation practically nonviable in many areas of southeastern Spain, especially in open

Free access

Santiago García-Martínez, Adrián Grau, Aranzazu Alonso, Fernando Rubio, Manuel Valero, and Juan J. Ruiz

strongly ribbed. However, this landrace is severely endangered and at risk of extinction as a result of its high susceptibility to several viruses such as those caused by the Tomato mosaic virus (ToMV), Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV), and Tomato

Free access

Santiago García-Martínez, Adrián Grau, Aranzazu Alonso, Fernando Rubio, Manuel Valero, and Juan J. Ruiz

Pera cultivars are highly susceptible to several viruses such as Tomato mosaic virus (ToMV), Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV), and Tomato yellow curl virus (TYLCV) ( Ruiz et al., 2005 ). A breeding program for the introgression of resistance to

Open access

Santiago García-Martínez, Adrián Grau, Aranzazu Alonso, Pedro Carbonell, Juan F. Salinas, José A. Cabrera, and Juan J. Ruiz

years, cherry tomato has shown an increasing market share. Like all tomato landraces, cherry cultivars are susceptible to several viruses, such as Tomato mosaic virus (ToMV), Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV), Tomato yellow curl virus (TYLCV

Open access

Santiago García-Martínez, Adrián Grau, Aranzazu Alonso, Pedro Carbonell, Juan Francisco Salinas, José Ángel Cabrera, and Juan J. Ruiz

many tomato landraces, ‘Moruno’ cultivars are highly susceptible to several viruses, such as Tomato mosaic virus (ToMV), Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV), and Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV) ( Cebolla-Cornejo et al., 2007 ), Pepino mosaic

Free access

Michael G. Bausher

most recognized source of transmission is thrips ( Kumar et al., 1993 ). On the other hand, the tobamoviruses including ToMV can be transmitted mechanically through contact with soil, water, or foliage ( Antignus et al., 1990 ; Hollings, 1976

Free access

Christopher J. French, Maureen Elder, and Frank Skelton

Tomato mosaic virus (ToMV) virions were recovered from guttation fluid of systemically infected tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) and visualized by electron microscopy. Similarly, pepper mild mottle virus (PMMV) particles were identified in gattation fluid of systemically infected green pepper (Capsicum annuum L.). Infectivity of ToMV and PMMV in guttation fluid samples was demonstrated on local and systemic hosts. As determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, the concentration of ToMV in tomato guttation fluid was 0.9 ± 0.2 μg·ml-1 and the concentration of PMMV in green pepper guttation fluid was 0.5 ± 0.1 μg·ml-1. The occurrence of infectious, mechanically transmissible viruses in guttation fluid maybe an important factor in the spread of plant viruses in greenhouse crops.

Free access

J. Cohen, Noga Sikron, S. Shuval, and A. Gera

In this study, 18 Petunia ×hybrida Hort. Volm.-Andr. cultivars were mechanically inoculated with the tobamoviruses tobacco mosaic (TMV) or tomato mosaic virus (ToMV) (20 μg·L-1 in 0.05 m sodium phosphate buffer). One and 2 weeks post-inoculation (PI), inoculated and noninoculated upper leaves were harvested and assayed for TMV infection using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Local lesions developed on inoculated leaves of 16 cultivars 3-5 days PI. A total of 11 and 16 of the cultivars developed systemic symptoms characteristic of tobamovirus infection 2 weeks after inoculation with TMV and ToMV, respectively. All cultivars were positive in ELISA tests. Large amounts of virus were recovered from the upper, noninoculated leaves of all cultivars, including symptomless plants. Up to 95% infection by TMV occurred when a sterilized knife was passed through an infected shoot of petunia prior to its being used to remove cuttings from healthy petunia plants. Heat sterilization of knives and/or treatment with 2.8 g·L-1 sodium troclosene was very effective in controlling TMV transmission.