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Juan Carlos Díaz-Pérez and Touria E. Eaton

Karam, F. Saliba, R. Skaf, S. Breidy, J. Rouphael, Y. Balendonck, J. 2011 Yield and water use of eggplants ( Solanum melongena L.) under full and deficit irrigation regimes Agr. Water Mgt. 98 1307 1316 Kirnak, H. Tas, I. Kaya, C. Higgs, D. 2002 Effects

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Carmina Gisbert, Judith M. Dumm, Jaime Prohens, Santiago Vilanova, and John R. Stommel

plant transcription factors Plant J. 66 94 116 Frary, A. Frary, A. Daunay, M.C. Huvenaars, K. Mank, R. Doganlar, S. 2014 QTL hotspots in eggplant ( Solanum melongena ) detected with a high resolution map and CIM analysis Euphytica 197 211 228 Gisbert, C

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Heeock Boo, Honggi Kim, and Hyunhwa Lee

Eggplant ( Solanum melongena L.), as a member of the Solanaceae family, mostly demands high temperature and light during its growth ( Krug, 1991 ; Messiaen, 1989 ). It is usually grown in open fields during summer and in greenhouses during

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K. R. McCammon and S. Honma

Abstract

Interspecific hybrids between Solanum melongena L. cv. Millionaire and S. torvum Sw. were produced by hybridization using S. torvum as the pollen parent. The progeny was determined to be hybrid based on morphological and cytological observations. Reciprocal attempts to self- and backcross the hybrid to the parental species were unsuccessful. Observations of the pollen from the F1 plants indicated low viability. Meiosis in the parents appeared normal. Cytological observations of hybrid pollen mother cells (PMC) indicated abnormalities at all meiotic stages.

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J. M. Schalk, A. K. Stoner, Ralph E. Webb, and H. F. Winters

Abstract

The Agricultural Research Service collection of eggplant (Solanum melongena L.) and related Solanum species from throughout the world was screened for resistance to the carmine spider mite Tetranychus cinnabarinus (Boisduval). Tolerance to mite feeding damage was found in S. melongena (P.I. 269663 and 269660), and antibiosis was found in S. mammosum L. (P.I. 245968), S. sisymbrifolium Lam. (P.I. 337597), and S. pseudocapsicum L. (P.I. 368425). P.I. accessions 245968, 368425, 269663, and 269660 were least preferred for feeding and oviposition.

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J.P. Morales-Payan and W.M. Stall

Field experiments were conducted in Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic, to determine the effect of increasing population densities of purple nutsedge (Cyperus rotundus) on the yield of eggplant (Solanum melongena). Purple nutsedge populations were established by transplanting viable tubers on 1-m-wide soil beds previously fumigated to suppress volunteer weeds. Nutsedge densities were 0, 50, 100, 150, and 200 plants (tubers) per m2. `Jira' eggplants and purple nutsedge were transplanted the same day and were allowed to interfere season-long. Purple nutsedge initial population densities of up to 100 plants per m2 did not significantly affect the fruit yield of `Jira' eggplants. However, nutsedge densities between 100 and 200 plants per m2 had a significant impact on eggplant yield, causing a linear decline in fruit yield as purple nutsedge density increased. Eggplant fruit yield loss was 22.3% at the density of 200 nutsedge plants per m2.

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J. J. Baron and S. F. Gorski

Abstract

Several elevated concentrations of CO2 were injected into the root atmosphere to determine the influence of CO2 concentration in the soil on the growth of eggplant (Solanum melongena L.). Elevated CO2 levels in the root atmosphere consistently increased stem diameter while a significant increase in plant total dry weight and leaf area only occurred during long day/warm temperature conditions. Under periods of short days and low light levels, 15% CO2 reduced total dry weight and leaf area. Applications of 14CO2 to the root zone demonstrated that 14C eggplant roots absorb CO2 from the soil environment and translocate labeled compounds into the shoot.

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Mahdi S. Abdal and Jagan N. Sharma

Eggplant is an important vegetable crop in Kuwait. Eggplant is considered to have moderately sensitive salt-tolerance, though no quantitative information is available on its salt sensitivity. Selecting salt-tolerant genotypes in eggplant is an ongoing project at Kuwait Institute for Scientific Research. Towards the goal of selecting salt-tolerant genotypes in eggplant a completely randomized experiment using 10 cultivars, replicated 3 times were tested against 2 levels of high salinity stress (EC MS.cm-1 at 25°C, 15.0 and 18.0) along with the control (EC MS.cm-1 at 25°C, 3.0). The experiment was conducted on 15 days old seedlings inside a greenhouse. Data on shoot length and visual observations on leaf necrosis, leaf collapse and root color was also recorded. There was a clear degree of variability as well as significant differences in growth and final survival, between cultivars at 2 levels of salinity stress. Those genotypes that showed significant higher growth rates and survival without any signs on leaf necrosis and root collapse formed the basis salt-tolerant genotypes.

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John R. Stommel and Judith M. Dumm

-specific primers ( Table 1 ). Table 1. Solanum melongena gene-specific primers for real-time polymerase chain reaction amplification of flavonoid biosynthetic and regulatory genes. For real time PCR, cDNA synthesis was performed with 1 μg RNA using the iScript TM

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Brian A. Kahn

environment Sci. Hort. 151 83 89 10.1016/j.scienta.2012.12.007 Illangakoon, T.K. Bandara, D.C. Fonseka, H. 2004 Evaluation of physio-agronomic and chemical traits in relation to the productivity of eggplant ( Solanum melongena L.) Trop. Agr. Res. 16 14 24