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Pilar Soengas, Pablo Velasco, Guillermo Padilla, Amando Ordás and Maria Elena Cartea

Brassica napus includes economically important crops such as oilseed rape, rutabaga, and leaf rape. Other vegetable forms of Brassica napus, namely nabicol and couve-nabiça, are grown in northwestern Spain and north of Portugal, respectively, and their leaves are used for human consumption and fodder. The relationship of nabicol with other Brassica napus leafy crops was studied before, but its origin remained unclear. The aims of this work were to study the genetic relationships among nabicol landraces and other B. napus crops based on microsatellites and to relate the genotypic differences with the use of the crop. The relationship among 35 Brassica napus populations representing different crops was studied based on 16 microsatellite markers. An analysis of molecular variance was performed partitioning the total variance into three components. The source of variation resulting from groups was defined considering the main use of the crop and accounted for a smaller percentage of variation than other sources of variation, proving that this division is not real. Populations clustered into seven different clusters using a similarity coefficient of 0.82. No clear association was evident between clusters and the main use of populations, suggesting genetic differences among populations could reflect differences in their origin/breeding or domestication. Spanish nabicol could have originated from a sample of couve-nabiças, and couve-nabiças could be used to improve nabicol landraces, because they have a narrow genetic basis that limits their potential for breeding.

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Li Li, Ling Liu, Deshuang Zhang, Ping Wu, Fenglan Zhang and Xiulan Xu

with close genetic relationships are difficult to screen. By contrast, SSR fingerprints have some obvious advantages, such as simplicity, clarity, and accuracy ( Li and Zheng, 2009 ; Li et al., 2009 ; Shi et al., 2007 ; Suwabe et al., 2002 ). Indeed

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Min Fan, Yike Gao, Yaohui Gao, Zhiping Wu, Hua Liu and Qixiang Zhang

, could enhance important chrysanthemum ornamental traits. Hence, development of polymorphic markers is urgently needed. Molecular markers are valuable tools used in genetic linkage map construction and MAS breeding. Among molecular markers, SSR markers

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Barbara S. Gilmore, Nahla V. Bassil, Danny L. Barney, Brian J. Knaus and Kim E. Hummer

SSR markers are more reproducible and can be shared among laboratories. In addition to being typically codominant and exhibiting Mendelian inheritance, they also provide anchored loci for comparative mapping. These qualities make SSR markers an ideal

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Warren F. Lamboy and Christopher G. Alpha

discussions of grape SSRs. We thank Mark Thomas and Nigel Scott of CSIRO, Adelaide, South Australia, for sharing their SSR results, techniques, and data. Steve Kresovich and his collaborators at the USDA-ARS Plant Genetic Resources Conservation Unit, Griffin

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He Li, Cheng-Jiang Ruan, Li Wang, Jian Ding and Xing-Jun Tian

). Compared with the molecular markers mentioned above, SSR (microsatellite) markers, which are 1 to 6 bp DNA regions repeated in tandem, have desirable advantages, such as codominance, random distribution throughout the genome, a high level of polymorphisms

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Cunquan Yuan, Zhiyi Qu, Huitang Pan, Tangren Cheng, Jia Wang and Qixiang Zhang

addition, the transferability of SSR markers between Primula species is exceptionally low. SSR markers are considered to be effective in genetic diversity analysis, linkage, and QTL mapping; marker-assisted selection; and so on ( Rosazlina et al., 2015

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Eric T. Stafne, John R. Clark, Courtney A. Weber, Julie Graham and Kim S. Lewers

1 To whom reprint requests should be addressed. E-mail: lewersk@ba.ars.usda.gov . The authors wish to thank Ms. Kate Rappaport for SSR testing reactions and Ms. Tina Sphon for reaction analyses. Thanks also to Dr. Tad Sonstagard for managing, and

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Ming Cai, Ke Wang, Le Luo, Hui-tang Pan, Qi-xiang Zhang and Yu-yong Yang

, cytological, and SSR data. Materials and Methods Plant material and pollinations. Hydrangea macrophylla ‘Blue Diamond’, ‘Schneeball’, and H . arborescens ‘Annabelle’ were used in this study. To improve the success rate of hybridization, H. macrophylla

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Li Li, Xiulan Xu, Ping Wu, Guo Zhang and Xiaobing Zhang

vegetable hybrids. With the development of expressed sequence tag-SSR and genomic SSR loci and markers in melons ( Chiba et al., 2003 ; Fernandez-Silva et al., 2008 ; Fukino et al., 2007 ; Park et al., 2013 ; Seung and Yong, 2006 ), SSR markers have been