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Robert H. Stamps and Annette L. Chandler

Desiccation of containerized plants at retail outlets due to inadequate watering is a recurring problem. Water stress can decrease plant quality and survivability. Treatments that could reduce plant transpiration without lowering plant quality could be beneficial in maximizing the likelihood that plants would not become water stressed between waterings at retail outlets. Abscisic acid (ABA) is known to be involved in the regulation of stomatal aperatures, the major control mechanism for transpirational water loss. Containerized plants of four cultivars of hibiscus were thoroughly sprayed with S-ABA at concentrations of 0, 125, 250 or 500 mg·L–1. Plants were held under simulated retail conditions and were not watered until visible wilting occurred. Transpiration and pot weights were monitored over time. Transpiration rates and weight loss percentages were negatively correlated with S-ABA concentrations. Effects on transpiration rates lasted for at least 30 hours after treatment. For mean hours to wilt, there was interaction between S-ABA treatments and cultivars. For the most sensitive cultivar (`Double Apricot'), treatment with S-ABA at 500 mg·L–1 almost doubled the time to plant wilt (130 h) compared to the control treatment (72 hours). Hours to wilt was increased 24% for `Double Pink' treated at the highest rate. For `Double Red' and `Single Pink', hours to wilt was not affected by treatments. For some hibiscus, S-ABA treatments prior to placement of plants at retail outlets might decrease the chances that the plants would become severely water stressed.

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Renata Koyama, Ronan Carlos Colombo, Wellington Fernando Silva Borges, João Pedro Silvestre, Ibrar Hussain, Muhammad Shahab, Saeed Ahmed, Sandra Helena Prudencio, Reginaldo Teodoro de Souza and Sergio Ruffo Roberto

-abscisic acid ( S -ABA), a natural ABA enantiomer, are effective at increasing endogenous ABA levels ( Ferrara et al., 2013 ), accelerating the coloring process ( Cantín et al., 2007 ) and increasing the uniformity of the color of grape clusters ( Koyama et

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Shinsuke Agehara and Daniel I. Leskovar

transplanting according to the commercial nursery. The formulation of ABA stock solution was VBC-30151 (Valent BioSciences) containing 10% of S-ABA, a naturally occurring active form in plants. Uniconazole was formulated as Sumagic. Test solutions were prepared

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Steven J. McArtney, Suzanne R. Abrams, Derek D. Woolard and Peter D. Petracek

relationship between g S and photosynthesis was different in ‘Braeburn’ and ‘Fuji’ apples, although net CO 2 assimilation rate in both cultivars was positively related to g S . ABA is rapidly catabolized in plants, principally through oxidation of the 8

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Shinsuke Agehara and Daniel I. Leskovar

-modulating effects and phytotoxicity of ABA in muskmelon seedlings over a range of concentrations from 0.24 to 7.57 m m ( Agehara and Leskovar, 2012 ). The formulation of ABA stock solution was VBC-30151 (Valent BioSciences, Libertyville, IL) containing 10% of S-ABA

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Nicole L. Waterland, John J. Finer and Michelle L. Jones

-induced wilting ( Goreta et al., 2007 ). A new commercial product containing s-ABA, the biologically active form of ABA, ConTego (Valent BioSciences, Libertyville, IL), delays wilting in a variety of bedding plants under severe drought stress ( Blanchard et al

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Nicole L. Waterland, Craig A. Campbell, John J. Finer and Michelle L. Jones

). Experiments with a new ABA formulation (s-ABA; ConTego™; Valent BioSciences Corp.) have shown that sprench (spray to runoff) applications of 125 or 250 mg·L −1 delay drought-induced wilting symptoms in seven of nine species of bedding plants that were

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Nicole L. Waterland, John J. Finer and Michelle L. Jones

treated with drench or spray applications of s-ABA. Leaf chlorosis in pansies was not directly induced by drought treatment, because symptoms were observed in both watered and drought-stressed plants that were treated with s-ABA ( Waterland et al., 2010

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Renata Koyama, Adriane Marinho de Assis, Lilian Yukari Yamamoto, Wellington Fernando Borges, Rogério de Sá Borges, Sandra Helena Prudêncio and Sergio Ruffo Roberto

). Recently, a method has been developed for the biological production of S -ABA, a specific isomer of ABA, using the Botrytis cinerea fungus, making the production process economically viable for agricultural use ( Owen et al., 2009 ; Siewers et al., 2006

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Suejin Park, Sarah A. Mills, Youyoun Moon and Nicole L. Waterland

-based compounds (SAC1 and SAC2), which are supposed to increase the concentration of ABA in plants, and s-ABA. SAC1 contains xylitol, and SAC2 contains polyhydric alcohol and extracts from seaweed [e.g., red algae ( Gracilaria sp.)], corn ( Zea mays ), and