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Mary Ann Rose and Larry J. Kuhns

Large bare-root liners of Gleditsia triacanthos `Moraine' and Pyrus calleryana `Aristocrat' were planted in spring, 1989. Five trees of each species were pruned by removing 50% of the length of each shoot at planting; 5 control trees were not pruned. After 4 months the trees were harvested and the following measurements were taken on the season's new growth increment: total number of elongated shoots and unelongated shoots (< 1 cm in length), total and average length of elongated new shoots, stem and leaf dry weights.

Growth responses of the 2 species to treatments were nearly identical. Pruned trees had fewer shoots than controls but a much higher proportion of elongated to unelongated shoots. This could be the result of a release of apical dominance. The average new shoot length of pruned trees was 2-3 times that of controls, and the total new shoot length was significantly greater. New stem dry weights of the pruned trees were also greater than the controls, but leaf dry weights were not significantly different. Total shoot weights (stems plus leaves) were not different. In this study there was no difference between treatments in the total seasonal growth increment as measured by weight. An equivalent amount of new growth was distributed on fewer, but more rapidly-elongating branches in the pruned trees.

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Mary Ann Rose and Larry J. Kuhns

Large bare-root liners of Gleditsia triacanthos `Moraine' and Pyrus calleryana `Aristocrat' were planted in spring, 1989. Five trees of each species were pruned by removing 50% of the length of each shoot at planting; 5 control trees were not pruned. After 4 months the trees were harvested and the following measurements were taken on the season's new growth increment: total number of elongated shoots and unelongated shoots (< 1 cm in length), total and average length of elongated new shoots, stem and leaf dry weights.

Growth responses of the 2 species to treatments were nearly identical. Pruned trees had fewer shoots than controls but a much higher proportion of elongated to unelongated shoots. This could be the result of a release of apical dominance. The average new shoot length of pruned trees was 2-3 times that of controls, and the total new shoot length was significantly greater. New stem dry weights of the pruned trees were also greater than the controls, but leaf dry weights were not significantly different. Total shoot weights (stems plus leaves) were not different. In this study there was no difference between treatments in the total seasonal growth increment as measured by weight. An equivalent amount of new growth was distributed on fewer, but more rapidly-elongating branches in the pruned trees.

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Daniel C. Milbocker

Pyrus calleryana, Decne, `Aristocrat'; Cryptomeria japonica, D. Don; Populus maximowiczii, Henry × `Androscoggin' and Koelreuteria bipinnata, Franch. trees were grown in low-profile containers. The optimum height and width of these containers was 20 to 30 cm and 84 cm, respectively. Pine bark and mixtures containing 50% or more of pine bark were preferable to mixtures containing leaf mold for filling the containers because the former weigh less. Roots penetrated pine bark mixtures better than sphagnum peat mixtures and also retained their shape better during transplanting. When grown in low-profile containers, trees grew fibrous root systems; after transplanting, roots grew downwardly radial and trees were able to withstand extremely difficult landscape conditions.