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Central Asia is a center of origin for many important fruit and nut tree species, including wild and cultivated apricots ( Prunus armeniaca ) ( Vavilov, 1931 , 1951 ). Apricots, considered by many to be one of the most delicious tree fruits, have

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Apricot ( Prunus armeniaca L.) is one of the important fruit trees originating from China, and it is highly appreciated by consumers because of its early ripening, gorgeous colors, and nutritional content ( Zhang and Zhang, 2003 ). Apricot

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Fruit trees grown in soils contaminated with lead arsenate (PbHAsO4) pesticide residues are subject to arsenic (As) phytotoxicity, a condition that may be exacerbated by use of phosphate fertilizers. A potted soil experiment was conducted to examine the influence of phosphate fertilizer on accumulation of As and lead (Pb) in apricot (Prunus armeniaca) seedlings grown in a lead arsenate-contaminated Burch loam coil. Treatments were fertilizer source (mono-ammonium phosphate [MAP], ammonium hydrogen sulfate [AHS]) and rate (0, 8.7, 17.4, and 26.1 -mmol/liter), and presence/absence of lead, arsenate contamination (231 -mg/kg coil). Plant biomass accumulation was reduced by lead arsenate presence and by high fertilizer rates, the latter due to soil salinization. Phytoaccumulation of As was enhanced by lead arsenate presence and by increasing MAP rate but was not influenced by AHS rate, salinity, or acidity of soil. Phytoaccumulation of Pb was enhanced by lead arsenate presence but was not influenced by fertilizer treatment.

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and cultivar ( Prunus armeniaca L.) used in all of the experiments were fresh apricots harvested. Fruits were harvested at deep orange 1 (fully ripe) in Malatya, Turkey ( Table 1 ). At each harvest date, we formed random lots, each with 30 fruits

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Abstract

‘Rival’ a new cultivar of apricot (Prunus armeniaca L.) developed for the Pacific Northwest, if peeled, produces a processed product that is equal to, or superior to ‘Tilton’, a standard canning cultivar, in shear values, succulometer values, Vitamin C content, objective and sensory color, flavor, and texture.

Open Access

Abstract

Unpeeled and peeled ‘Rival’ and ‘Tilton’ apricots (Prunus armeniaca L.) were canned at 2 levels of vacuum and headspace. Differences in the canned product were significant between cultivar, peeling treatment and vacuum in the drained weights, dissolved Sn content of the syrup, corrosion of the cans and clearness of the syrup. ‘Rival’ apricots had less drained weight loss, reduced amounts of Sn, less visual corrosion, and a clearer syrup than ‘Tilton’ apricots. Peeling the apricots increased drained weight loss and Sn content, and reduced the clearness of the syrup. Low vacuum increased Sn content, visual corrosion and clearness of the syrup, and reduced drained weight loss.

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Shoot tip and single-node cutting explants of `Hamawy' and `El-Amar' apricot cultivars were initiated from forced shoots of field-grown, virus-free trees. Explants were cultured on Murashige & Skoog (MS) Nitsch & Nitsch and Anderson media. Different modifications of MS medium were also evaluated. Antioxidant pretreatment reduced phenolic compounds and decreased necrosis. Modified MS was the best medium for plantlets regeneration, with positive effectiveness of adenine sulfate addition to the modified MS. Shoot multiplication was best on 2.0 mg·L–1 BAP and 1.0 mg·L–1 thidiazuron (TDZ). Also, half-strength MS medium was superior for shoot elongation Surface coverage, 16 hours light/8 hours dark cycle, and 2.0 mg·L–1 IBA induced good rooting. Rooted plantlets were successfully acclimated ex vitro.

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Abstract

Propagation of apricot (Prunus armeniaca L.) has been achieved using several media for establishment, shoot development, and rooting. Most of the rooted plants were established successfully outdoors.

Open Access

Abstract

‘Castlebrite’ is an early-maturing apricot (Prunus armeniaca L.) for the fresh market with exceptional color and firmness. The fruit ripens toward the end of May, with ‘Pinkerton’ and about 4 weeks before ‘Blenheim’.

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Abstract

‘Velvaglo’ is a very attractive apricot (Prunus armeniaca L.) ripening in the last week of July with ‘Goldcot’. It has moderate resistance to bacterial spot (Xanthomonas pruni (E. F. Smith) Dowson), brown rot (Monilinia fructi-cola (Wint.) Honey) and perennial canker (Leucostoma spp). It was introduced in 1978 as a later-ripening cultivar than ‘Harcot’, adapted to conditions of southern Ontario, Canada.

Open Access