Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 35 items for :

  • "Proteaceae" x
Clear All
Free access

Rod Jones and John Faragher

Five members of the Proteaceae and 13 Australian native cut flower cultivars were stored for 35 days under standard conditions at 1C to assess their ability to withstand long-term storage and transport. Protea cynaroides L., Leucadendron `Silvan Red', Leucospermum `Firewheel', Thryptomene calycina (Lindl.) Stapf., Telopea speciosissima R. Br., and Verticordia grandtiflora Endl. retained a vase life of at least 7 days after 21 days of storage. Leucospermum cordifolium Salisb. ex Knight, Protea neriifoli R. Br., Chamelaucium uncinatum `Alba', C. uncinatum `Purple Pride', Verticordia monadelpha Turcz., Verticordia plumosa (Desf.) Druce, and Verticordia nitens (Lindl.) Schau. suffered a decline in vase life ranging from 31% to 100% after 14 to 21 days of storage. Species of Verticordia and Chamelaucium were particularly susceptible to fungal infection. Anigozanthos pulcherrimus Hook. and the Anigozanthos cultivars Ruby Delight, Bush Harmony, Bush Haze, and Gold Fever all showed a significant reduction in vase life after 14 days of storage compared with unstored controls.

Free access

Eric Bunn and Kingsley W. Dixon

Micropropagation, including adventitious shoot growth from leaf sections, was achieved for Grevillea scapigera (Proteaceae), a rare and endangered species from Western Australia. Shoot tips were initiated on filter paper supports with liquid WPM (Woody Plant Medium) and supplemented with 20 μm zeatin riboside and 2 μm GA3. Shoots were then incubated on WPM solidified with agar and supplemented with 5 μm kinetin and 0.5 μm BA, which produced an approximate 6-fold multiplication rate per month. Up to three adventitious shoots were induced from 0.7-cm2 leaf sections after 6 to 7 weeks on solid 1/2 MS (Murashige and Skoog) medium supplemented with 10 μm BA and 0.5 μm IBA. Shoots, 30 to 50 mm long, were rooted in vivo in a fogged glasshouse under 70% shade using a commerical rooting powder [IBA, 0.1% (w/w)] applied to the base of the shoots. Most (67%) of the shoots treated in this way rooted after 5 weeks. Established, rooted plants have been grown on under glasshouse conditions. Chemical names used: N6-[2-isopentenyl] adenine riboside (zeatin riboside); gibberellic acid (GA3); 6-furfurylaminopurine (kinetin); N-(phenylmethyl)-1H-purine-6-amine (BA); 1-H-indole-3-butyric acid (IBA).

Restricted access

Eugenie-Lien Louw, Eleanor W. Hoffman, Karen I. Theron and Stephanie J.E. Midgley

The Western Cape region of South Africa, where Proteaceae have traditionally been cultivated as cut flower products, has a Mediterranean-type climate with warm, dry summers with minimum and maximum temperatures of 9.3 and 41.3 °C in January

Free access

G.M. Littlejohn, G.C. van den Berg and G.J. Brits

Free access

Caroline J. Poole, Audrey I. Gerber and Gerard Jacobs

Brunia albiflora (Pillans) is harvested commercially in South Africa as a cut flower for export to European markets. To compete with European cut flowers high quality and continuity of product during the marketing period are essential. Optimizing the cut-flower potential of B. albiflora requires an understanding of the flowering process and selection of clonal material. We present a series of scanning electron micrographs which show three-dimensional images of the developmental stages of the shoot apex during the transition from the vegetative to the reproductive state. In B. albiflora the inflorescence consists of more than 15 individual rotund inflorescences arising from lateral positions on the terminal portion of the shoot. Development of the apical meristem of axillary shoots was studied to determine the time and sequence of inflorescence initiation and development. These observations identified that flower initiation occurs in October, followed by flower development through summer, with anthesis being reached from February to March.

Free access

Audrey I. Gerber, Karen I. Theron and Gerard Jacobs

Inflorescence initiation in Protea cv. Lady Di (P. magnifica Link × P. compacta R. Br.) occurs predominantly on the spring growth flush when it is subtended by one or more previous growth flushes. Mature, over-wintering leaves are essential for induction of flowering in `Lady Di', and are also crucial to the early stages of inflorescence initiation and differentiation. Defoliation before elongation of the spring growth flush was complete prevented flowering, and shoots either remained vegetative or produced inflorescences that aborted. Levels of carbohydrates in the stem and leaves of overwintering shoots were low, and early growth and development of both the spring flush and inflorescence were, therefore, supported by current photosynthates from the mature leaves on the overwintering shoot. Likewise, reserve carbohydrates available in the flowering shoot were insufficient to account for the rapid increase in dry weight during the major portion of growth of the spring flush and inflorescence. This increase occurred after elongation of the spring flush was complete and was supported by current photosynthates from the leaves of the spring flush. Defoliation treatments that did not prevent inflorescence initiation had no effect on inflorescence development or on flowering time.

Free access

Audrey I. Gerber, Karen I. Theron and Gerard Jacobs

The date of pruning affected flowering time of Protea cv. Sylvia (P. eximia × P. susannae) by influencing the flush on which inflorescence initiation occurred, and the harvest could be manipulated to fall within the optimum marketing period for export to Europe. Flowers initiated on the spring flush reached anthesis in January-February, those on the first and second summer flushes in April-May and July-August, respectively, and those on the autumn flush in November-December. Thus, flowering shoots harvested within the optimum marketing period (September to February) initiated inflorescences on the autumn and spring flushes. Because shoots on the spring flush initiated inflorescences readily, many flowering shoots harvested in January and February (following initiation the previous spring) were short and therefore unmarketable. For commercial production, pruning in July is recommended to allow harvest in October-December of the following year. Since the vegetative and reproductive cycles necessary to produce inflorescences on long stems span more than a year, a biennial cropping system is recommended.

Free access

Audrey I. Gerber, Karen I. Theron and Gerard Jacobs

Protea L. sp. can be assigned to groups according to similar times of flower initiation and harvest. The stages occurring during flower initiation and their synchrony relative to shoot growth were investigated for three cultivars when flower initiation occurred on the spring growth flush. For all three cultivars, the spring flush was preformed and enclosed in the apical bud before spring budbreak. During elongation of the spring flush, the apical meristem produced floral primordia which differentiated into involucral bracts. After completion of the spring flush, meristematic activity continued and produced floral bracts with florets in their axils. The different cultivars were characterized by differences or similarities in the time of budbreak, and the rates of shoot growth, appendage formation, and flower development. Insight into the time of flower initiation relative to vegetative growth could be useful in making management decisions, as well as forming a basis for manipulation of the flowering process.

Free access

L.M. Blomerus, G.J. Brits and G.M. Littlejohn