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James W. Olmstead, Matthew D. Whiting, David Ophardt, Nnadozie C. Oraguzie, and Gregory A. Lang

PC7064-3’, trademarked as Selah®, is a new sweet cherry ( Prunus avium L.) for fresh market production released from the Washington State University (WSU) Sweet Cherry Breeding Program. In the Pacific Northwest of the United States production

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James W. Olmstead, Matthew D. Whiting, David Ophardt, Nnadozie C. Oraguzie, and Gregory A. Lang

PC7146-8’, more commonly known under the trademarked name Benton®, is a new sweet cherry ( Prunus avium L.) for fresh market production released from the Washington State University Sweet Cherry Breeding Program. In the Pacific Northwest of the

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Nnadozie C. Oraguzie, D. Ophardt, Matthew D. Whiting, Gregory A. Lang, and Lynn E. Long

PC 7903-2’, more commonly known under the trademarked name, Cowiche™, is a sweet cherry variety released in 2007 by the Washington State University Sweet Cherry Breeding Program for fresh market production. In Pacific Northwest production areas of

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George C.J. Fernandez

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Gene A. Giacomelli and William J. Roberts

The diversity of coverings for the greenhouse and other plant production structures has increased dramatically during the past 4 decades. This has resulted from the availability of new types of covering materials and enhancements of previously existing materials, as well as the demands for technological improvements within the expanding controlled environment agricultural industry. The types of coverings currently available are dominated by plastics. These range from traditional glass to the recent advent of polymer plastics, such as thin films or multilayer rigid thermoset plastic panels. Available enhancements such as ultraviolet radiation (UV) degradation inhibitors, infrared radiation (IR) absorbency, and anti-condensation drip surfaces, as well as their physical and spectral properties are discussed. The selection of specific covering alternatives has implications for the greenhouse superstructure and its enclosed crop production system.

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Melike Cirak and James R. Myers

quality standards are not as stringent, may have colored seeds. Another seedcoat color type being used in snap bean is persistent color ( pc ), with ≈40% of snap bean acreage in the United States planted to cultivars with this trait ( Myers et al

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D.E. Yarborough and P.C. Bhowmik

Bunchberry (Cornus canadensis L.) is increasing in density and distribution in lowbush blueberry fields (Vaccinium angustifolium Ait.) in Maine and Nova Scota. Replacement series experiments to assess competitive effects of bunchberry were established on native stands of blueberries at Blueberry Hill Farm in Jonesboro, ME in 1986 and 1987. Ten 0.42 M2 quadrats were established on prune and crop fields with cover ratings where c=crop, blueberry and w=weed, bunchberry at 100c/0w, 75c/25w, 50c/50w, 25c/75w, 0c/100w. Dormant blueberry and bunchberry plugs from prune fields were transplanted into five, 0.42 M2 boxes at 16 plugs/box in the above proportions in April 1987 and grown in the greenhouse over the summer in Orono, ME. Regression of individual vs associate yield indicates blueberry and bunchberry equivalent in competitive ability. Blueberries are competitive with bunchberry but in native fields open areas among clones allow faster growing bunchberry to spread without competition.

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K.R. Woodburn and P.C. Andersen

Fruit characteristics of Oriental persimmon (Diospyros kaki L.) [`Fuyu' (Expts. 1 and 2) and `Tanenashi' (Expt. 3)] were assessed as a function of five pollination treatments: 1) hand-pollination (HP) with `Gailey' pollen (G); 2) HP with `Nishimura Wase' pollen (NW); 3) HP with `Turkeytown' pollen (T) (not used for `Tanenashi'); 4) open-pollination (OP), which did not necessarily result in pollination; and 5) nonpollination (NP) where pollination was prevented by covering the flower. Final fruit set of `Fuyu' and `Tanenashi' was higher for G and NW pollen than for NP. Differences in fruit set among the remaining treatments depended on the particular experiment. For example, fruit set for OP was higher than for NP in Expts. 1 and 3 but not Expt. 2. Fruit weight and soluble solids concentration (SSC) of `Fuyu' were not affected by treatment in Expts. 1 and 2; however, in Expt. 2, fruit height and diameter of G, NW, T, or OP were larger than for NP. Seed count per fruit was inversely related to fruit development period but did not influence fruit size or SSC. Fruit height, diameter, weight, and total soluble solids of `Tanenashi' for G, NW, and OP exceeded those for NP, although rarely were seeds present.

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P.C. Andersen and W.B. Sherman

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J. Roger Harris and Edward F. Gilman

Abbreviations: CER, carbon exchange rate; FC, fabric containers; FG, field grown; PC, plastic containers; Ψ leaf , leaf water potential. 1 Current address: Urban Horticulture Institute, 20 Plant Science Bldg., Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY 14853