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Anthony M. Ortiz, Brent S. Sipes, Susan C. Miyasaka, and Alton S. Arakaki

( Colocasia esculenta ) when grown under upland conditions (i.e., non-flooded) can be infected by the root-knot nematode ( Meloidogyne javanica ), resulting in substantial reductions in yields ( Sipes et al., 1995 ). Little naturally occurring resistance to M

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Jorge Pinochet, Carolina Fernández, María de Carmen Jaizme, and Pedro Tenoury

The effects of the interaction between the vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus Glomus intraradices Schenk and Smith and the root-knot nematode Meloidogyne javanica (Treub) Chitwood on growth and nutrition of micropropagated `Grand Naine' banana (Musa AAA) were studied under greenhouse conditions. Inoculation with G. intraradices significantly increased growth of plants in relation to nonmycorrhizal plants and was more effective than P fertilization in promoting plant development. Mycorrhizal colonization did not affect nematode buildup in the roots, although plants with the nematode and mycorrhiza were more galled. Meloidogyne javanica had no effect on the percentage of root colonization in mycorrhiza-inoculated plants. No element deficiency was detected by foliar analysis. All elements were within sufficiency levels for banana with exception of N, which was low. Potassium levels were lower in mycorrhizal plants, while Ca and Mg levels were higher with mycorrhiza than without, with or without the nematode. Early inoculation with G. intraradices appears to favor growth of banana plants by enhancing plant nutrition.

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P.W. Simon, P.A. Roberts, and L.S. Boiteux

Nematodes impart significant damage to carrot production worldwide. Genetic resistance was studied for Meloidogyne javanica, one of the three major nematodes affecting carrots in warmer climates. F2, F3, and backcross families of `Brasilia' × B6274 were evaluated for resistance in inoculated seedlings. Resistance was conditioned by one, or two linked, dominant loci. Molecular markers were also evaluated with bulked segregant analysis. Three RAPD markers and AFLPs were associated with resistance loci.

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Jordi Canals, Jorge Pinochet, and Antonio Felipe

The influence of temperature and age of the plant was determined on nematode reproduction on a susceptible almond (Prunus amygdalus Batsch.) and on a resistant peach-almond hybrid (P. persica Stok. × P. amygdalus Batsch.) rootstock inoculated with Meloidogyne javanica (Treub) Chitwood. Experiments were conducted under greenhouse conditions in heated and unheated sand beds. `Garrigues' almond inoculated with 3000 nematodes per plant showed extensive galling, high final nematode population levels, and high counts of nematodes per gram of root at 27 and 32C. The hybrid G × N No. 1 showed minimal galling and reproduction at 27C but higher levels of galling and final population and nematode counts per gram of root at 32C, suggesting a partial loss of resistance with temperature increase. One-month-old and 1-year-old plants of `Garrigues' were susceptible following inoculation with 2000 nematodes per plant, although plantlets (l-month) were significantly more affected. Plantlets of hybrid G × N No. 1 were also susceptible, but 1-year-old plants were resistant. Resistant genotypes (G × N selections) seem to require root tissue maturation before expressing full resistance.

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Jorge Pinochet, Cinta Calvet, Adriana Hernández-Dorrego, Ariadna Bonet, Antonio Felipe, and Marian Moreno

Two trials involving 20 Prunus rootstocks were conducted under greenhouse conditions to screen for resistance to root-knot nematode [Meloidogyne javanica (Treub.) Chitwood]. Many of the tested materials are interspecific hybrid rootstocks and represent new commercial peach (P. persica Batsch) and plum (Prunus sp.) releases or experimental genotypes of Spanish, French, and Italian origin. In the first trial, the rootstocks Adesoto 101 (P. insititia L.), Bruce (P. salicina Lindl. × P. angustifolia Marsh.), Ishtara, AC-952 (P. insititia), Garnem [P. dulcis (Mill.) D.A. Webb × P. persica], Cadaman [P. persica × P. davidiana (Carr.) Franch], and Orotava (P. salicina) were immune or resistant to a mixture of 10 isolates of M. javanica. The remaining rootstocks, Myrocal (P. cerasifera Ehr.), Montclar (P. persica), and Adafuel (P. dulcis × P. persica), were susceptible. In the second screening trial, the plum rootstocks Adesoto 101, Adara (P. cerasifera), Myro-10 (P. cerasifera), Constantí (P. domestica L.), and AD 105 (P. insititia) were immune to the root-knot nematode. Cadaman, G × N No. 17 (P. dulcis × P. persica), and Tetra (P. domestica) were resistant. Laroda F1OP (P. salicina), Myro-almond (P. cerasifera × P. dulcis), and the peach–almond hybrids Mayor, Adafuel, and Sirio were susceptible.

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Sindynara Ferreira, Luiz Antonio A. Gomes, Wilson Roberto Maluf, Vicente Paulo Campos, José Luiz S. de Carvalho Filho, and Daniela Costa Santos

to root-knot nematode reproduction ( Table 1 ). Table 1. Relative reproduction index (RRI) of Meloidogyne javanica and Meloidogyne incognita races 1 and 3 and resistance degree (RD) of three dry bean cultivars, seven snap bean cultivars

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Zhen-Xiang Lu, Gregory L. Reighard, Andrew P. Nyczepir, Thomas G. Beckman, and David W. Ramming

Two F1 hybrid Prunus rootstocks, K62-68 and P101-41, developed from a cross of `Lovell' [susceptible to both Meloidogyne incognita (Kofoid and White) Chitwood and M. javanica (Treub) Chitwood] and `Nemared' (resistant to both root-knot nematode species), were selfed to produce two F2 seedling populations. Vegetative propagation by herbaceous stem cuttings was used to produce four or eight self-rooted plants of each F2 seedling for treatment replications. Eggs of M. incognita and M. javanica were inoculated into the potted media where plants were transplanted, and plants were harvested and roots examined for signs and symptoms associated with root-knot nematode infection ≈120 days later. Segregation ratios in both F2 families suggested that resistance to M. incognita in `Nemared' is controlled by two dominant genes (Mi and Mij) and that to M. javanica by a single dominant gene (Mij). Thus, Mij conveys resistance to both M. incognita and M. javanica.

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Maureen M.M. Fitch, Terryl C.W. Leong, Xiaoling He, Heather R.K. McCafferty, Yun J. Zhu, Paul H. Moore, Dennis Gonsalves, Herb S. Aldwinckle, and Howard J. Atkinson

, bacterial leaf blight, Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. dieffenbachiae , and nematodes, Radopholus similis and Meloidogyne javanica ( Alvarez et al., 2006 ), were attenuated or eliminated. Most commercial cultivars are susceptible to both pests. Strong

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W. R. Maluf, S. M. Azevedo, and V.P. Campos

Heritabilities for resistance to root knot nematodes (Meloidogyne javanica and Meloidogyne incognita races 1, 2, 3, and 4) were studied in a population of 226 sweetpotato clones of diverse origin. For each nematode isolate tested, 128-cell speedling trays were filled with previously inoculated substrate (30000 eggs/1000 mL substrate). Sweetpotato clones suitably tagged and identified were randomly planted in the cells (one plant/cell), with a total of four plants per clone per isolate. Ninety days after inoculation, sweetpotato plants had their roots washed for substrate removal, and treated with 150 mg·L–1 Phloxine B to stain nematode egg masses. The number of egg masses per root was recorded, and plants were accordingly assigned scores from 0 (highly resistant) to 5 (highly susceptible). Broad-sense heritability estimates were 0.87, 0.91, 0.81, 0.95, and 0.93 respectively for resistance to M. javanica and races 1, 2, 3, and 4 of M. incognita. The frequencies of resistant genotypes were higher for M. javanica and lower for M. incognita race 2. Genotypic correlations (rG) among the resistances to the various Meloidogyne isolates utilized were weak, ranging from 0.11 to 0.57, suggesting independent genetic controls. Clones could be selected, however, with high levels of resistance to all nematode isolates tested. (This work was supported by CNPq, CAPES, FAPEMIG, and FAEPE/UFLA.)

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Jorge Pinochet, Carolina Fernández, Cinta Calvet, Adriana Hernández-Dorrego, and Antonio Felipe

Twenty-nine commercial and experimental Prunus rootstocks, most with incorporated root-knot nematode [Meloidogyne javanica (Traub.) Chitwood] resistance, were evaluated against mixtures comprising nine populations of the root-lesion nematode Pratylenchus vulnus Allen and Jensen. Nearly all tested materials were susceptible. Five cultivars with high resistant levels were further challenged with seven P. vulnus populations individually. `Redglow' (Prunus salicina Lindl. × P. munsoniana Wight and Hedrick) was the only rootstock that showed broad resistance to all populations. The rootstocks `Torinel' (P. domestica L.), AC-595 (P. domestica × P. insititia L.), `Marianna 4001' (P. cerasifera Ehr. × P. munsoniana), and `Felinem' [P. dulcis (Mill.) D. A. Webb × P. persica (L.) Batsch] showed resistance to one or a few P. vulnus populations. Several supposedly resistant sources proved to be susceptible. Tests of crosses made between parents of diverse genetic background with partial resistance to P. vulnus indicate that a descendant with potential P. vulnus resistance is difficult to obtain. Pathogenic diversity among P. vulnus populations appears to be high.